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Application of CASE Tools, IEE Colloquium on

Date 5 Apr 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Formal description techniques in robot programming

    Page(s): 1/1 - 1/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (288 KB)  

    A study is reported whose aim was to produce a system to facilitate offline programming of robots and to provide a testbed for alternative algorithms for the services provided. The system was specified using the formal description technique LOTOS (language of temporal ordering specification). LOTOS is best known for its use in the description of OSI protocols and is supported by an ISO standard. LOTOS consists of a process algebra for specifying the structure of the system and the interactions between components of the system, and an algebraic data typing mechanism for specifying the operations the system carries out. The description of the system was heavily influenced by techniques used in the design of operating systems. Concurrency was introduced at the initial design stage, there was an explicit separation of concerns and the specification was structured hierarchically, with actions at one level appearing atomic to the next higher level. Each level in the hierarchy provides an increasingly abstract view of the robot. The resulting description was executed, or animated, using the SEDOS tool, to help determine that the correct behaviour had been encapsulated by the description. The specification was then implemented on a network of transputers, using 3L Parallel Pascal View full abstract»

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  • μral-a formal development support environment

    Page(s): 4/1 - 4/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (76 KB)  

    The μral system has been developed as a part of the Alvey/SERC funded IPSE 2.5 project. It consists of two components, a specification support tool and a proof assistant. Together these provide support for the construction of and formal reasoning about formal specifications. The system attempts to emulate `paper and pencil' specification and proof by making extensive use of workstation/windowing technology in its user interface. Its interface thus consists of a series of `tools', each a separate window and each specially tailored for interaction with the different kinds of object within μral (e.g., the specification tool for constructing specifications, the proof tool for constructing proofs, etc.). This enables the user to focus attention on the current area of interest. On the other hand, the system tries to be as `open' as possible, placing the emphasis on user, rather than machine, control. The machine is thus responsible for all `book-keeping' aspects of the system, that is maintaining consistency and tracking incompleteness, leaving the user free to extend and modify the system at will within the bounds of the inbuilt consistency constraints View full abstract»

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  • The formal development of robot software

    Page(s): 2/1 - 2/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    A description is given of the use of the formal method VDM (C.B. Jones, 1986), in the development of a piece of control software for a simple robotics problem taken from W.E. Snyder (1985). The problem concerns the transfer of blocks from a conveyor belt to a pallet. An abstract specification of the problem is constructed which is then refined to a more implementation-oriented specification. The latter is then translated in a semi-mechanical fashion to an implementation. The authors concentrate on the nature of the two levels of specification. In the first, they ensure that the models used to represent the robot, pallet and conveyor belt interact correctly, ignoring implementation details such as how the robot moves. In the second, they refine the initial specification to incorporate details of the robot's movement including the constraints on its movement which prevent it colliding with the pallet or the conveyor belt View full abstract»

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  • A computer aided animation tool set

    Page(s): 7/1 - 7/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (180 KB)  

    Computer based support for the animation of object oriented formal specifications is desirable and technically feasible. This has been brought about by the arrival of new formal notation similar to Z but employing object oriented principles. Initial work on an animation tool set which in addition to the usual editing and type checking facilities also provides tools for developing animations, is described. Prolog code is generated by automatic translation of the formal description. This executable code can then be transformed to obtain a number of views of a specification (A.J.J. Dick et al., 1989). The tool set includes a Prolog transformation system which performs both user guided and automatic optimisation of code View full abstract»

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  • A CASE tool for demonstrating Z specifications

    Page(s): 5/1 - 5/4
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)  

    The CASE tool described, is designed to enable software engineers to produce a faithful animation of specifications written in Z. Desirable properties which animations of this kind should possess, and which have guided the authors in developing the tool, are the following: the executable code (i.e., the animation) must be easy to produce; the structure of the code should not be too far removed from the Z; and the animation should be sufficiently user friendly to enable a client to understand and interact with it. The CASE tool is based around the program development tool known as CRYSTAL. CRYSTAL is sold as an expert system shell by Intelligent Environments Ltd. It is essentially a rule-based programming language offering excellent input, output, and menu facilities, as well as all the standard features expected of any expert system shell View full abstract»

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  • The application of tools to an IPSE

    Page(s): 3/1 - 3/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB)  

    An IPSE (integrated project support environment), is a generalisation of computer aided software engineering techniques to include all the activities and information within a project. It is implemented on a distributed computer system and contains the following major functions: information and procedure management and tools for information creation and transformation. The author proposes that an IPSE is an application of conventional data management and process control techniques and is not just a `workstation'. Procedural management is fundamental to orderly application of tools and the tools themselves need explicit specification. Controlled evolution of trusted components may then result in a manageable and efficient IPSE which is suitable for application to critical systems View full abstract»

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  • IEE Colloquium on `Application of CASE Tools' (Digest No.058)

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    The following topics were dealt with: formal development of robot software; application of tools to IPSE; μral, formal development support environment; CASE tool for Z specifications; type-checker for Z; and computer aided animation tool set View full abstract»

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  • Zork: a type-checker for Z from York

    Page(s): 6/1 - 6/5
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    Z specifications have been written at York for some years. However, the tool support was minimal: some troff macros to draw schema boxes, and fancy characters that were formed by overlaying existing characters. The aim of the authors' work was to rectify this situation, without requiring major changes to the existing specifications. They started by improving the typesetting tools by drawing a Z font and improving their troff previewer for the Sun workstations. The authors provided a core for Z by deriving an unambiguous LALR(1) grammar and applying yacc to this grammar to obtain a parser for Zork. They present a small example specification to demonstrate Zork's capabilities. It especially shows the kind of errors that a type-checker can detect and illustrates how interactive browsing aids the reporting and correction of these errors View full abstract»

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