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Computer Workstations, 1988., Proceedings of the 2nd IEEE Conference on

Date 7-10 March 1988

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Proceedings of the 2nd IEEE Conference on Computer Workstations (Cat. No.88CH2441-4)

    Publication Year: 1988
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A multi-processor system for Prolog processing

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 60 - 69
    Cited by:  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (776 KB)  

    A RISC-based multiprocessor system called MIEP (Multiple Inference Engine for Prolog) is proposed as a tool to construct an intelligent workstation for AI applications. The MIEP contains general purpose processor modules (processor with local memory) and PIER (a Prolog inference engine on a RISC) modules interconnected by a bus. A PIER module contains a LISCP (limited instruction set computer for Prolog) as the kernel Prolog processor, a floating point coprocessor, FPC, and a cache memory. The PIER module has been simulated and evaluated with some benchmark programs. Primary results show that PIER can achieve a peak performance of more than 500 KLIPS. In addition, a parallel execution model for Prolog on MIEP has been studied and evaluated. Design issues and features of the MIEP system are presented View full abstract»

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  • The Dante application interface

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 102 - 110
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
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    The Dante Project is a research effort to design and construct a powerful, uniform user interface for current and future generations of computer workstations. One of its goals is to present to the user a multi-window, multi-tasking interface to a comprehensive set of facilities. Common tools such as shells, programming systems, and editors are integrated as well as more advanced tools such as an extensible frame-based database system. The authors described the application interface, the channel through which programmers access the facilities provided by Dante. The application interface is designed around a declarative, data-oriented philosophy that gives programmers a unique degree of flexibility and control over a large set of facilities. Several examples of its use in implementing application programs are given to illustrate its capabilities View full abstract»

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  • A virtual cache-based workstation architecture

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 80 - 87
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (568 KB)  

    The virtual cache-based architecture of the Apollo DN4000 workstation is presented. The architecture is discussed in detail, including the main factors that influenced its final design. The influences of the operating system on the cache architecture are discussed, as well as the subsequent influences of the cache on the operating system to maintain cache coherency. It is shown how the method of assessing objects in Apollo's system has led to a write-allocate cache update policy to solve the virtual address synonym problem. It is also shown how maintaining cache coherency requires special consideration by the operating system during virtual-to-physical address mapping changes, context switches, modification of data without using virtual addresses (e.g. DMA), and processor modification of page-table used bits. The primary design goal of the DN4000 was to double the CPU performance of the existing Apollo DN3000. Performance measurements indicate that use of a virtually tagged cache and a virtual write buffer lead to achievement of this goal View full abstract»

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  • QuickSilver distributed file services: an architecture for horizontal growth

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 23 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (9)  |  Patents (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1160 KB)  

    An architecture is presented for a file service capable of supporting a very large number of users. It provides each user with a lifetime involvement with the file service while giving the appearance of a single homogeneous system. The architecture is based on the provision of an independent name space for each user and the use of hints for name resolution. File caching is supported and server callbacks are used to aid in maintaining cache consistency. Update-in-place semantics are provided for those applications that required direct access to localized parts of the files. All file service metadata are updated in atomic and recoverable ways using write-ahead logging. The file service also supports user-level distributed atomic actions based on a two-phase commit synchronization protocol. It supports user and resource reassignments in a location-independent way by using the system's user location mechanism during file name resolution. File sharing information remains valid even when participants migrate View full abstract»

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  • Tools for building image processing and graphics applications in a workstation environment

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 122 - 131
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (784 KB)  

    A workstation-based environment for the development of image processing and graphics applications is described. The focus is on two graphical tools provided by the environment. The first tool is a graphical user interface based on the concept of a software control panel. Through a control panel, the user may interactively modify application program parameters and exercise fine-grain control over program execution. The second tool is a graphical block diagram constructor, which allows the user to build executable block diagrams based on standard application programs. Both of the graphical tools are integrated into the framework of an interactive programming environment that provides overall support for applications development View full abstract»

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  • An open-systems model for computer-supported collaboration

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 40 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (884 KB)  

    Computer-supported collaborative work (CSCW) involves the concurrent sharing of application packages by various geographically distributed users, the sharing of common databases, and the sharing of electronic messages. MOSAIC (multimedia open system for augmented interactive collaboration), a model for CSCW systems, is described in detail. A prototype designed to support collaborative decision-making is discussed. The main contribution of MOSAIC to CSCW is the delineation of how user interfaces, user collaboration, and information management functions fit together. This model differs from others in that special attention is paid to the dialogue between system users and the ways in which the system can augment that dialogue. The authors suggest that this model can provide a development framework much as the ISO reference model has in the development of standardized protocols for communication systems View full abstract»

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  • Parallel building: experience with a CASE system for workstation networks

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 2 - 11
    Cited by:  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (808 KB)  

    A CASE (computer-aided software engineering) system that was designed and developed for a local area network of high-performance workstations is described. The system increases group software productivity by providing reliable and efficient source code control and configuration management. It increases individual productivity by exploiting a network computing environment to build components of a system in parallel on many remote computers. Parallel building allows a system to be built in a small fraction of the time required on a single computer, dramatically reducing the duration of the compile/test/debug cycle View full abstract»

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  • The Rapport multimedia conferencing system-a software overview

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 52 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (59)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (532 KB)  

    The Rapport multimedia conferencing system supports interactive, real-time, distributed conferences among two or more people. Executing on personal workstations interconnected by data and voice networks, Rapport provides basic mechanisms to create, manage, and terminate conferences. The authors focus on the Rapport software, which is a three-level hierarchy comprised of the user interface, conference server, and system levels. The user interface level provides humans and other programs with access to the Rapport system. Maintaining consistent views of the conference for all the participants, the conference server level coordinates the activities of the conferees and provides basic protocols for exchanging information and control during a conference. The system level includes window management service and drivers for the hardware required to transmit data in the various media View full abstract»

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  • A dynamic profile of window system usage

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 90 - 99
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (532 KB)  

    To obtain a dynamic profile of user input and application requests, an instrumented version of the X window was built and installed on a number of workstations. It was found that in the environment under study, over 90% of all requests are to display text, draw a rectangle, or fill a rectangle. Most text strings, vectors, windows, and area fills are relatively small; most area copies are large. The X client library reduces communication overhead by batching an average of four requests to the server in a single message. Thus, the data show that current server-based window system protocols can be quite efficient in actual use View full abstract»

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  • Automatic strategies in the Siemens RTL tiled window manager

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 111 - 119
    Cited by:  Patents (30)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (636 KB)  

    The Siemens RTL tiled window manager automatically adjusts the size and position of tiled windows to balance competing demands for screen space. The degree of automation can be set by both the user and control strategies, which range from strictly local to those which can affect all the windows on the screen. These strategies are discussed, the trade-offs involved are indicated and the algorithms used in their implementation are briefly described View full abstract»

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  • The ELIS interpreter-oriented Lisp-based workstation

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 70 - 79
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (724 KB)  

    A workstation has been developed using a single semi-custom VLSI chip, which is capable of running a fast Lisp-based language. It has an interpreter-oriented architecture based on the concept that similar logic functions, essential to list processing, can be realized by multiple implementation of a single logic circuit leading to a simplified datapath structure. The workstation exhibits an interpretation speed generally comparable to that of compiled code execution on a DEC-2060. The keys to achieving such high performance with small-sized hardware are a fully microcoded interpreter, implementation of a large hardware stack for variable binding, and multiple purpose registers designed to facilitate memory-access-intensive operations and byte manipulation. The language (TAO) on the workstation is a dialect of Lisp. TAO incorporates an object-oriented language and a logic programming language. The execution speed of either of the latter two types of languages is one-half that of Lisp. TAO supports multiple user operations and multiple process execution View full abstract»

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  • 3-D graphics applications in fluid flow simulations

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 142 - 147
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (452 KB)  

    The Fluid Dynamics Division of the NASA Ames Research Center is using high performance interactive computer graphics to help visualize flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about vehicles such as the space shuttle. In current configurations, computational solutions of the flow field are obtained from Cray supercomputers. These solutions are then transferred to workstations for creation and interactive viewing of dynamics 3-D displays of the flow fields. Specific animated sequences can be created for viewing on the workstation or for recording on video tape of 16 mm movies with the aid of specialized software that permits easy editing and automatic tweening of the sequences. The software and hardware required to generate and record these displays are detailed View full abstract»

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  • An overview of the Etherphone system and its applications

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 160 - 168
    Cited by:  Papers (14)  |  Patents (116)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (808 KB)  

    The Etherphone system has been developed to explore methods for extending existing multimedia office environments with the facilities needed to handle the transmission, storage, and manipulation of voice. Based on a hardware architecture that uses microprocessor-controlled telephones to transmit voice over an Ethernet that also supports a voice file server and a voice synthesis server, this system has been used for applications such as directory-based call placement, call logging, call filtering, and automatic call forwarding. Voice mail, voice annotation of multimedia documents, voice editing using standard text-editing techniques, and applications of synthetic voice use the Etherphones for voice transmission. Recent work has focused on the creation of a comprehensive voice system architecture, both to specify programming interfaces for custom uses of voice, and to specify the roles of different system components, so that equipment from multiple vendors could be integrated to provide sophisticated voice services View full abstract»

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  • Overview of GMW+Wnn system

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 170 - 177
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (788 KB)  

    A window system, GMW, and a Japanese inputting system, Wnn, have been developed together to serve as flexible and network-extensible infrastructures for building workstation environments, especially with Japanese languages. GMW is an overlapping window system which is intended to support a wide range of graphical workstation environments with a user-friendly interface. It features a clean, high-level and flexible imaging model, as well as extensibility, modifiability, and portability, and is based on a virtual-machine-server-type implementation. Wnn is a highly user-customizable kana-to-kanji conversion system which converts several sentences by one request. In this first Japanese inputting system, all internal structures, including source codes and dictionaries, are completely open to the users. It serves as a flexible and powerful Japanese front-end module for a variety of workstation application software View full abstract»

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  • Workstation-based shape matching experiments

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 132 - 141
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    There are a variety of mathematical formulations for specifying smooth curves using spline techniques. A controlled experiment has been performed to test the hypothesis that the mathematical formulation selected will influence the ease with which two-dimensional shape matching can be performed in a workstation environment. The experiment compares four mathematical formulations (B-splines, Bezier, Cardinal, and C2 interpolating) for specifying smooth curves through the placement of control vertices View full abstract»

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  • The design and implementation of a decentralized scheduling facility for a workstation cluster

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 12 - 22
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1024 KB)  

    A decentralized scheduling facility designed for a large, heterogeneous, workstation-based distributed system is described. A system with existing facilities for remote execution and (possibly) task migration is assumed. The solution proposed is not only performance-effective but also robust against processor and communication failures, scalable to large systems with a high frequency of scheduling needs, and stable. It has been implemented on a large distributed system based on the V kernel. Several scheduling requirements of parallel computations, executing as task groups where the individual tasks executed in parallel on different workstations, are exposed. These requirements significantly complicate the scheduling process. A possible solution for effectively scheduling these task groups is presented View full abstract»

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  • An audio and telephone server for multi-media workstations

    Publication Year: 1988 , Page(s): 150 - 159
    Cited by:  Papers (4)  |  Patents (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (840 KB)  

    Workstation utility may be enhanced by the addition of audio and telephony functions for a number of applications, such as voice mail, multi-media documents, and computer conferencing. The requirements of these applications are outlined, and an audio server architecture, using a personal computer with a disk and speech-processing board as a server dedicated to the workstation, is presented. The functional interface between client and server is described, as well as the motivation for this specific server approach with particular emphasis on user interface considerations. Experience with the audio server architecture is reported and it is contrasted with alternate architectures View full abstract»

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