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Professionalism in Engineering Design: European Perspectives, IEE Colloquium on

Date 20 Feb 1991

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  • IEE Colloquium on `Professionalism in Engineering Design: European Perspectives' (Digest No.046)

    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (16 KB)  

    The following topics were dealt with: interdisciplinary engineering design; manufacturing; human centred system design; and automated manufacturing experiences in Germany View full abstract»

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  • Interdisciplinary engineering design: life without boxes

    Page(s): 1/1 - 1/7
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    The author outlines some of the problems (both economic and environmental) that the manufacturing industry will have to face up to in the future. The author then suggests that effective solutions to these problems cannot be developed within the framework of the current division of knowledge. The way forward lies in a world without boxes, something which is definitely not the basis of an easy solution. Based on this belief the author tries to map out a vision of a new engineering design paradigm, and suggest reasons why it will not be easy to achieve a shift in the paradigm View full abstract»

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  • Increasing efficiency by means of human-centred system design

    Page(s): 2/1 - 2/3
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    During the 1980s, developments have been taking place in several European countries to establish concepts of human-centred system design. Today the design of a technical system is often understood as the design of a more or less automated system and will always be the design of a man-machine system. The dual design approach is a set of principles to insure appropriate development of both technical and human aspects of man-machine systems. Usually project engineers tend to head for fully automated concepts. The authors discuss this approach as well as the working-process based design approach View full abstract»

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  • German experiences in automated manufacturing based on human skill and knowledge

    Page(s): 3/1 - 3/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (96 KB)  

    In the attempt to make the fabrication of certain products more flexible, two things have become apparent in the past. On the one hand, maximum division of labor (in the Taylorian sense), in most cases, will not produce optimum results; instead, increased attention should be paid to sufficient qualification and appropriate organization of the persons involved in the manufacturing processes. On the other hand, a choice among options must be made in the technical design of manufacturing equipment (`technology as an option'). In particular, the appropriate degree of automation must be found in each case. Consequently, it is necessary that the appropriate automation be determined for each specific case of manufacturing. The lesson learnt in Germany is in short: economic success depends on the right combination of technology, organization of work and workers' qualifications. The author briefly gives some case examples and discusses appropriate engineering design View full abstract»

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