By Topic

Automotive Sensors, IEE Colloquium on

Date 11 May 1992

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • A petrol/alcohol ratio sensor for flexible-fuel vehicles

    Page(s): 4/1 - 4/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    A sensor, operating as a variable capacitance cell, has been developed for determining the ratio of methanol to petrol in fuel mixtures, through the measurement of the dielectric constant. When operated as part of a Digital Autoplex circuit, the sensor provides an approximately linear output across the full range of petrol/methanol mixture ratios, and is insensitive to variations in conductivity. The sensor is suitable for flexible-fuel vehicles which in the longer term should lead to a reduction in automotive pollution View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Automotive tyre pressure sensing

    Page(s): 5/1 - 5/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (220 KB)  

    The authors discuss the requirements of a tyre pressure sensor. They then describe a sensor in which a wheel-mounted mechanism produces a displacement as a function of tyre pressure. This displacement is used to vary the separation of a pair of permanent magnets. The position of these magnets is sensed from the vehicle chassis by means of a Hall probe. The thermal compensation for the sensor, and laboratory and vehicle testing are also described View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The need for a systems approach to automotive sensors-lessons hard learned

    Page(s): 1/1 - 1/5
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB)  

    The current trend towards increasing use of sophisticated electronic systems in the automotive arena shows a number of parallels with the aviation industry of the recent past. The authors' perspective from a systems company at the forefront of avionic systems development is that a systems approach is not yet being fully adopted within the automotive industry. The authors briefly discuss the development of avionic electronic systems and then discuss the non-machine interface and its importance. They then discuss the future directions of automotive electronics development and how the lessons learned from avionics can be applied to the automotive industry View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • FMCW radar: a low cost sensor for automotive applications

    Page(s): 6/1 - 6/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (196 KB)  

    The author briefly describes the requirements of an automotive sensor system and demonstrates how a simple FMCW radar can fulfil the specified requirements. In considering the cost of implementing such a system, emphasis is placed on the use of technology as is available at this time. A moderate improvement in sweep linearity enables the system to fulfil all signal to clutter requirements. This can be achieved by an `open loop' technique, thereby avoiding the extra costs incurred by additional millimetric components. The relatively low frequency output means that simple, commercial components can be employed in the signal processing system. The inherent sensitivity of the FMCW radar allows the RF component count to be reduced to a minimum without increasing the performance requirement of the remaining circuitry View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Application of an optical torque sensor to a vehicle power steering system

    Page(s): 9/1 - 9/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (144 KB)  

    The author describes the application of an optical torque sensor in a concept electric power assisted steering (EPAS) system for small cars which has been developed at Lucas Advanced Engineering Centre. A novel design of sensor enables the required performance to be obtained while still having the potential of low-cost manufacture compatible with the automotive market. An EPAS system uses an electric motor to provide the steering assistance, with control from an electronic torque sensor. Power is only consumed when assistance is actually required, thus improving fuel consumption, and the installation complexity and size are reduced. It is also possible to provide additional functions such as road-speed dependence and to interface with other vehicle systems such as active suspension at little extra cost. The system comprises a motor and epicyclic gearbox assembly mounted concentrically on the steering column. The torque sensor is incorporated within this assembly. An electronic control unit (ECU) processes the signals from the torque sensor and drives the motor View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Application of metallic glasses in automotive industry

    Page(s): 11/1 - 11/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (80 KB)  

    Amorphous materials in the ribbon or wire form have been commercially produced. There are two basic types, highly magnetostrictive, ideal for stress sensing, and zero magnetostrictive, ideal for proximity devices. A typical sensor uses less than 1 g of the material. The author discusses the use of these materials in force transducers, rotational speed sensors, noncontact torque sensors, vibration and acceleration sensors, and displacement/position sensors View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A novel noncontact strain measurement technique utilising Rayleigh waves

    Page(s): 10/1 - 10/6
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    The author discusses the limitations on a strain gauge for rotating or moving mechanisms. The author then discusses the use of a surface acoustic wave transducer to overcome these limitations. The principles of operation are briefly discussed. Torque (radial strain) sensors are also briefly discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optical sensors for automotive applications

    Page(s): 2/1 - 2/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (148 KB)  

    The authors describe the development of two automotive sensors by a co-operation between First Inertia Switch Ltd. and Sira R&D. The sensors in question were an automatic headlamp dipswitch, and a steering wheel rotation sensor. In both cases FISL provided the impetus and marketing strengths to maintain focus on the requirements, and Sira provided a design and development resource to meet the technical challenge. The automatic headlamp dipswitch is a device that changes the headlights from main beam to dipped beam when a bright source (e.g. oncoming car headlamps) are in the field of view. It consists of a lens, aperture plate, photocell and processing circuitry. The steering wheel rotation sensor consists of a launcher, light collectors, and electronic processing. It uses IR LED technology. The authors briefly describe how each sensor works View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optical speed-over-ground sensors for on-board vehicle speed measurement

    Page(s): 7/1 - 7/3
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)  

    Speed-over-ground (SOG) sensors can provide a potentially important input to advanced vehicle control systems, including instrumentation, navigation, braking, traction and steering. The basic requirements for automotive use include low cost, a speed range of 1-50 m/s, and a temperature range of -40-+85°C. A measuring rate of 10-50 Hz is needed in some applications. Exposure to rain or contamination and various road surface conditions should also be considered. The authors have chosen the optical spatial filtering technique, due to its simple construction and low cost. The sensor consists of a light source, imaging optics, and a photodetector array. The authors briefly discuss the principle of operation, its performance, and possible improvements View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEE Colloquium on `Automotive Sensors' (Digest No.107)

    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (56 KB)  

    The following topics were dealt with: automotive sensors; optical sensors; yaw rate sensor; fuel mixture sensor; tyre pressure sensor; radar systems; speed measurement; torque sensor; and metallic glass applications View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High accuracy radar speedometer

    Page(s): 8/1 - 8/5
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (188 KB)  

    The authors mention three techniques based upon spectral analysis for improving radar speedometer accuracy. These are FFT centre of gravity estimation, correlation technique, and super-resolution algorithms. Each of the techniques offers the potential for correcting for terrain bias error and, because of the increased amount of information available compared with a zero crossing approach, each lends itself well to built-in self-test (BIST) and safety critical systems. The most promising technique is the correlation algorithm which can easily be implemented using available DSP chips View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Yaw rate sensor for automotive applications

    Page(s): 3/1 - 3/2
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  

    The author discusses the development of the yaw rate sensor for braking systems. A vibrating structure gyroscope is used for the sensor. The author briefly describes the operating principles of the sensor which are based on a resonating piezoelectric cylinder View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.