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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Table of Contents

    Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Education publication information

    Page(s): C2
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  • Guest Editorial: A practical approach to understanding - and applying! - the scholarship of application

    Page(s): 69 - 74
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  • Project Circuits in a Basic Electric Circuits Course

    Page(s): 75 - 82
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (475 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The use of project circuits (a photoplethysmograph circuit and a simple audio amplifier), introduced in a sophomore-level electric circuits course utilizing active learning and inquiry-based methods, is described. The development of the project circuits was initiated to promote enhanced engagement and deeper understanding of course content among students. The new activities were assessed by student surveys, student scores on essay exams probing deeper learning, and classroom observations by an assessment specialist. The results are compared to similar assessments made before the introduction of the project circuits and are related to other applications of active learning approaches in the teaching of electric circuits. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluation of a Didactic Method for the Active Learning of Greedy Algorithms

    Page(s): 83 - 91
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (572 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An evaluation of the educational effectiveness of a didactic method for the active learning of greedy algorithms is presented. The didactic method sets students structured-inquiry challenges to be addressed with a specific experimental method, supported by the interactive system GreedEx. This didactic method has been refined over several years of use. Additional elements are lecture contents and the scheduling of classes and lab sessions. Learning gain in the topic of greedy algorithms was measured in the short term for two groups of students: an experimental group taught with the new didactic method, and a control group taught with a traditional approach. The results show a significant learning gain improvement in the experimental group, while the students taught with a traditional method had little learning gain. In addition, the levels of Bloom's taxonomy at which improvements occurred were identified. In the control group, improvements were found at the knowledge level. In the experimental group, however, improvements were found at the knowledge and the comprehension levels, although not at the analysis level. These results are encouraging and indicate directions for future research, as analysis skills are important in algorithm courses. View full abstract»

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  • Implementation and Assessment of a Virtual Laboratory of Parallel Robots Developed for Engineering Students

    Page(s): 92 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (698 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a tool, LABEL, oriented to the teaching of parallel robotics. The application, organized as a set of tools developed using Easy Java Simulations, enables the study of the kinematics of parallel robotics. A set of classical parallel structures was implemented such that LABEL can solve the inverse and direct kinematic problem of 5R, 3RRR, and Delta robots. An intuitive graphical user interface lets the student change the joint coordinates or Cartesian coordinates of the end effector while observing a graphical representation of the robot. In addition, a set of five practical sessions based upon this tool was developed. During the practical sessions, the student analyzes the inverse kinematics of parallel structures and the direct kinematic problem. Moreover, LABEL makes it easy to analyze the singularities that appear in the solution of the inverse and direct kinematic problem. These singularities are analyzed through the use of a path planning application, which allows the user to plan a trajectory in the robot's workspace. This helps the student to analyze the position and velocity of the end effector while observing the joint trajectories and speeds of the actuators. LABEL was implemented during the academic year 2011-2012 and has been well accepted. Finally, an assessment of LABEL is presented. View full abstract»

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  • Comparing Online to Face-to-Face Delivery of Undergraduate Digital Circuits Content

    Page(s): 99 - 106
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (512 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a comparison of online to traditional face-to-face delivery of undergraduate digital systems material. Two specific components of digital content were compared and evaluated: a sophomore logic circuits course with no laboratory, and a microprocessor laboratory component of a junior-level computer systems course. For each of these, a baseline level of student understanding was evaluated when they were being taught using traditional, face-to-face delivery. The course and lab component were then converted to being fully online, and the level of student understanding was again measured. In both cases, the same purpose-developed assessment tools were used to carry out the measurement of understanding. This paper presents the details of how the course components were converted to online delivery, including a discussion of the technology used to accomplish remote access of the electronic test equipment used in the laboratory. A comparison is then presented between the control and the experimental groups, including a statistical analysis of whether the delivery approach impacted student learning. Finally, student satisfaction is discussed, and instructor observations are given for the successful remote delivery of this type of class and laboratory. View full abstract»

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  • The Effect of Reworking Exam Problems on Problem-Solving Performance in a Circuit Analysis Course: An Exploratory Study

    Page(s): 107 - 111
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (449 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In foundational knowledge engineering courses, students engage in problem solving in order to learn important course concepts. To help in this process, students receive feedback on their performance from the instructor. This paper explores an alternative to instructor-provided feedback: a semi-structured assignment in which students reworked problems they failed to solve correctly on a midterm exam for credit. The assignment required students to provide a correct solution to the problem and identify both mathematical and conceptual errors made in the initial solution. The initial results show that students who completed this assignment were able to apply course concepts in analysis and reasoning questions more accurately than students who received exam feedback from the instructor. In addition, these students showed a marked improvement in their ability to solve problems common in a Circuit Analysis course. These results show that such semi-structured assignments can replace instructor-provided feedback in large-enrollment classes and lead to improved problem solving. View full abstract»

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  • A Case Study on a Capsule Robot in the Gastrointestinal Tract to Teach Robot Programming and Navigation

    Page(s): 112 - 121
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (770 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite the increasing importance of robotics, there is a significant challenge involved in teaching this to undergraduate students in biomedical engineering (BME) and other related disciplines in which robotics techniques could be readily applied. This paper addresses this challenge through the development and pilot testing of a bio-microrobotics case study that can be integrated into curricula in BME, electrical and computer engineering (ECE), and other disciplines. This case study is based on the existing technology of wireless capsule endoscopy and centered on a “grand challenge” of building a capsule robot to navigate the human gastrointestinal tract to detect abnormality or to destroy malignant tissues. First, a conceptual design example for building such a capsule robot is presented, followed by a laboratory module that demonstrates robot navigation techniques using Webots simulation. The case study introduces robotic technologies, including robot building components, operating modes, and behavior-based programming, and students experience robot simulation in the laboratory module. The case study developed was pilot tested in three BME and ECE courses at the authors' institution. The evaluation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the case study in enhancing students' understanding of robotics, interdisciplinary skills, and critical thinking. The case study is shown to support challenge-based learning, which promotes adaptive expertise through rapid knowledge building and innovation. View full abstract»

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  • 2013 IEEE Education Society Awards and Frontiers in Education Conference Awards

    Page(s): 122 - 128
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  • 2013 IEEE Educational Activities Board Awards

    Page(s): 129 - 137
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  • IEEE Transactions on Education Reviewers 2013

    Page(s): 138 - 142
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  • 2014 IEEE membership form

    Page(s): 143 - 144
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  • IEEE Transactions on Education information for authors

    Page(s): C3
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  • [Blank page - back cover]

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University