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Rural Telecommunications, 1990. Second International Conference on

Date 29-31 Oct 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 43
  • A TDMA point to multipoint rural radio system for trunking and local loop applications

    Page(s): 91 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (304 KB)  

    A TDMA point to multipoint rural radio system for trunking rural automatic exchanges in India is described. This system is expected to be a work-horse in providing telecommunications facilities in rural areas because of its flexibility, expandability and modular design View full abstract»

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  • Telecommunications network planning and modernization for a rural environment

    Page(s): 52 - 57
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    Describes a study that considered an alternative approach to rural network planning and modernization utilizing a new `Distributed Fibre Centre' architecture that takes advantage of the emerging SONET based transmission and switching technologies. Many new operations, administration, maintenance and provisioning (OAM&P) benefits can also occur as these new networks evolve. Together, the concepts suggested will create a network capable of supporting the changing and varied requirements of Bell Canada and its rural subscribers View full abstract»

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  • A distributed digital radio network for use in rural areas of developing countries

    Page(s): 96 - 98
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    A system under development at Warwick University, which combines the benefits of a distributed network such as the CB (Citizens' band) with those of conventional telephone networks is described. The system is based on the concept of telephones served by single channel radio stations capable of either terminating or relaying telephone calls, in a concept similar to packet radio. The size of the potential market merits the design of an optimal solution rather than achieving low costs by re-using technology designed for very different applications View full abstract»

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  • CRITER: a local network planning tool

    Page(s): 58 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (172 KB)  

    CRITER, a configurator, allows the study of rural or low-density urban network evolution over a fixed study period and covering several local exchange zones. This interactive computer tool is aimed towards the establishment of local network development plans. Its power comes from the fact that the program user can at any time during a CRITER session enter or modify any network data and very rapidly evaluate the consequences in term of equipment dimensioning and extension forecast as well as present worth value investment costs. Moreover the list of available telecommunication equipment can be increased interactively as well as modification of existing equipment characteristics. Added or modified equipment can be implemented in the network at any time View full abstract»

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  • Rural telecommunications in developing nations-a training ground for consultants?

    Page(s): 207 - 212
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (496 KB)  

    The author briefly describes the communications infrastructure in Papua New Guinea and mentions the lack of rural telecommunications development. Several companies have undertaken consultancy projects for the Post and Telecommunications Corporation to advise on rural telecommunication development plans. Some areas that need to be looked at in depth are the initial briefing of the consultants and their initial preparation and approach at measuring the ongoing and final results of projects. The author discusses in detail the initial preparation work between consultant and client, identifying the client's requirements, selection of technology and project design. The role of the consultant in these areas is discussed View full abstract»

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  • New solutions to old problems in the rural network

    Page(s): 126 - 131
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (412 KB)  

    New developments in telecommunications mean that it is possible to offer services in the most remote rural areas which are equal to those of major cities. It may therefore be possible to stop their depopulation and economic stagnation by the introduction of new technology into the telecommunications infrastructure. The authors look at some of this new technology and how it may be applied. For this purpose UK rural network is considered; however the concepts outlined could be applied to other networks with a comparable level of digitalisation, customer distribution and service penetration View full abstract»

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  • Advanced economic evaluation techniques for rural telecommunications projects

    Page(s): 61 - 66
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    Following some general observations on the role of economic evaluation in rural telecommunications planning, the paper illustrates the application of computer-based modelling to some examples, both real (case studies) and hypothetical. The authors begin with a hypothetical example-the introduction of telephone service into villages clustered around an urban centre. They then consider some examples taken from the work of the REVOLVE Project within the CEC's RACE Programme, where case study models have been used to investigate the economics of introducing broadband technologies into the rural and peripheral areas of Europe; issues considered include technology choice, provision strategy, and economic constraints on demand View full abstract»

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  • Solar photovoltaic systems for rural communications

    Page(s): 137 - 140
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (272 KB)  

    By their very nature, rural communications systems require a large number of pieces of equipment operating in distributed locations, often in remote areas. Traditional forms of generation are ill equipped to provide small amounts of power in isolated locations. Solar electric photovoltaic (PV) systems, by contrast, are ideally suited to this set up. They are modular so can be easily configured to the output levels available. The authors look at the technology of a photovoltaic generation which usually consists of three basic elements: photovoltaic array (one or more solar modules); battery storage system; and control unit View full abstract»

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  • Optical fibre technology for developing countries-the advantages and disadvantages

    Page(s): 190 - 195
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)  

    The authors begin with a review of the role of the Centre for Telecommunications Development and of the relationship between telecommunications investment and economic growth. The application of optical fibre technology to developing countries is reviewed in terms of its role in the telecommunications network of a developing country, the market for, and current/planned use of the technology in the telecommunications networks of a selection of developing countries. The requirements for optical fibre transmission systems in the developed world are reviewed and the additional requirements for their use in the developing world discussed. The economic advantage of optical fibre transmission over other transmission media is discussed. The need to provide education and training in the area of optical fibre technology is identified View full abstract»

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  • A user's expectations regarding the design of photovoltaic power plants for rural telecom systems in developing countries

    Page(s): 132 - 136
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    The Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) has funded a number of telecommunication systems in developing countries, making extensive use of photovoltaic power plants. Although very impressed with the advantages of such power plants, their performance has not fully met expectations. As a result, more attention is being paid to system design. Unfortunately this has proven to be a difficult task because of the lack of specific solar insolation data, the conflicting claims and varying data provided by the suppliers, a lack of standards, and the difficulty of understanding different computer-aided designs submitted by the various suppliers. The authors discuss these concerns and identify where more data is needed View full abstract»

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  • A decentralized knowledge-based maintenance system for rural telephone exchanges

    Page(s): 141 - 146
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB)  

    The authors describe a knowledge-based maintenance system for the Delft rural telephone system (DRTS), a nonhierarchical network of decentralized controlled interconnected nodes. They give an outline of the considerations that led to the implementation of a new approach to maintenance. First, the requirements for distributed diagnosis and control by means of a knowledge-based system are discussed. In the second part these requirements are translated to nodal hardware and software constraints and demands. Finally the present implementation and the future topics of development are reported on View full abstract»

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  • RACE project REVOLVE, regional evolution planning for IBCN

    Page(s): 10 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (612 KB)  

    Describes the REVOLVE Project, which is a research project under the RACE programme (Project No. R1028). The overall objective of REVOLVE is to outline the opportunities for te exploitation of broadband services in nonoptimal IBC environments, that is, in regions not usually considered ripe for broadband, such as rural and peripheral regions. REVOLVE takes a broad approach: looking beyond technical and technological issues, it considers also the surrounding economic, political and social environment and the interaction of the various factors in the evolution towards the Integrated Broadband Communications ideal View full abstract»

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  • Point to multipoint radio in the British Telecom network

    Page(s): 85 - 90
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (492 KB)  

    The authors address the issues encountered when operating a telecommunications network in a UK rural environment. Some of the difficulties encountered are similar to those experienced in other parts of the world. To provide expedient and cost-effective solutions to the rural communications problems, the use of microwave radio systems has been considered. Trials of such systems have helped in formulating a system definition requirement. From the extensive case studies of rural network problems, it has been concluded that an overlay network of multipoint radio systems will result in an effective way of providing telephony service quickly, to customers which are difficult to serve by conventional means. Tenders for the supply of multipoint systems have been invited and these will be judged against a number of important technical and operational requirements identified from previous field trials View full abstract»

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  • Short span self supporting fibre optic aerial cable, a comparison of different designs

    Page(s): 196 - 201
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (332 KB)  

    The authors discuss design criteria and dimensional guidelines for fibre optic short span aerial cables, the method of sag calculation, and cable strain behaviour. The installation method on poles and a comparison of three different metal free cable designs (tight buffered fibres, central loose tubes, stranded loose tubes) are reported. Only self supporting cables, metal free, with circular cross section are considered View full abstract»

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  • Rural telecommunications development in Botswana: socio-economic & strategic issues

    Page(s): 42 - 46
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (364 KB)  

    In 1989, a study was undertaken to plan the development of rural telecommunications in Botswana. The project examined the feasibility of a nationwide programme to bring telephone service to all Botswana villages with a population over 500. The study was funded by the African Development Bank, and was conducted on behalf of the Government of Botswana by CANAC Telecom and INTELECON Research & Consultancy Ltd. Assistance was provided by the Botswana Telecommunications Corporation (BTC). The paper deals with the financial, socio-economic and human resource aspects of the envisaged programme. The study also involved a substantial engineering component, including outline designs for serving all 200 villages View full abstract»

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  • Possible use of satellites in rural telecommunications in Africa

    Page(s): 156 - 159
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB)  

    In most of the African countries, telecommunication facilities exist only in a few major cities in which not more than 20 percent of the population resides. About 80 percent of the population resides in the rural areas, but this overwhelming majority has no access to telecommunications. With the advent of satellite communications which is distance insensitive, and in particular, the widespread use of regional and domestic satellites, many studies have indicated the possibility of launching an African satellite to provide regional coverage to African countries. Such a regional satellite will extend telecommunications beyond a few cities to the remote villages. The author highlights some of the features of the OLYMPUS satellite which would facilitate the study and planning of an African satellite system. The cost-effective manner in which remote areas could utilise the associated small Earth terminals is also considered View full abstract»

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  • Rural communication: the global concept

    Page(s): 177 - 182
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    The low numbers of subscribers in rural areas and the long distances between communities pose a number of problems in providing modern telecommunication facilities. These are often compounded by adverse climates and inhospitable terrain. Overcoming these problems requires a global solution combining compatible transmission, switching, and distribution facilities to optimise telecommunication networks in rural areas, meeting both present needs and allowing for future expansion. The system approach is effective in minimising global investment and operating costs. It is based on a number of key subsystems which have been developed to cope with the main requirements of rural networks, including simplicity and low cost; easy installation, operations, and maintenance; low power consumption allowing the use of solar cells (most network failures in remote areas are caused by primary power supplies); suitability for use in difficult environmental conditions; and flexibility View full abstract»

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  • Optimizing rural network structure

    Page(s): 73 - 78
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    Derives a generic network model which can be used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of the reduction of the number of switching centres and network levels, so determining the optimal structure for a given technical configuration of the network. The model can be used to compare the costs of different switching and transmission solutions, to examine the global cost consequence of the derivation from the optimal structure and the dependence of the optimum on the various cost and design parameters. The mathematical formulation and engineering consideration of the probabilistic network model are presented, and some analysis results for rural network planning are provided View full abstract»

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  • The socio-economic need for a rural-urban telecommunication link: a case study of Kwazulu/Natal, South Africa

    Page(s): 47 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (488 KB)  

    The authors conducted research which was based on a number of surveys of families in both rural and number areas. The aim was to establish: the socio-economic needs of the rural inhabitants of Kwazulu for a viable telecommunications network; the rural-urban telecommunication links in Kwazulu/Natal; and the viability of a public telecommunications network for Kwazulu which might also be appropriate for other areas displaying similar characteristics View full abstract»

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  • Planning and implementing a rural telecommunication system using microwave TDMA subscriber radio

    Page(s): 171 - 176
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (760 KB)  

    Point-to-multipoint (P-MP) radio systems operating at microwave frequencies and using time division multiple access (TDMA) techniques are now widely used to provide modern telecommunications services to rural areas. From a new technique pioneered in the 1970s by SR Telecom in Canada, it has become the method of choice all over the world where radio is used. This widespread acceptance is due to the economy, flexibility, reliability and high quality of service that such systems can offer, in rural and remote regions, compared with other means. The author deals with some of the practical considerations necessary for the successful planning and implementation of a rural telecommunications system based on SR Telecom's experience with its SR100 and SR500 systems View full abstract»

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  • The simulation of a fully distributed meteor burst communication network

    Page(s): 115 - 120
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (292 KB)  

    Meteor-scatter techniques are presented as a useful alternative for communications in extended rural communities. The characteristics of meteor-scatter propagation and the hardware requirements are described. Simulation results are presented for a fully distributed, 5 node, meteor-scatter network. These relate network performance to data transmission rate and communication range View full abstract»

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  • Development of rural telecommunications and the CTD

    Page(s): 17 - 23
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    Discusses a number of projects undertaken by the Centre for Telecommunications (CTD). In 1988 the CTD examined the viability of card operated payphones for villages and isolated areas in developing countries. The CTD has completed a number of rural telecommunication projects in Tanzania, Gambia, Egypt and Nepal. Several ITU studies have shown that rural telecommunications can facilitate may development activities including agriculture, industry, education and health care View full abstract»

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  • Fibreless optical communication links for isolated communities

    Page(s): 202 - 206
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    The authors propose a short-haul point-to-point fibreless optical link. It is based on the results of numerous measurements accumulated over a 3-year period at University College London in the course of work on an R&D project on self-adaptive steering of optical beams. The authors describe the system and the experimental optical link. The technical characteristics of the link, the range capabilities and power budgets are also discussed. The range is discussed for still and turbulent atmospheric conditions. The suitability of the link for optical communications is discussed View full abstract»

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  • One step ahead with TDMA

    Page(s): 183 - 189
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    The authors present the development of the TDMA principle applied to point to multipoint radio telecommunication systems, from its early days when it satisfied only a small segment of the rural telephony market in the developing countries. Today it is no longer the case as TDMA P-MP radio systems find their place even in suburban-urban areas of highly developed countries. The authors demonstrate how the technical developments have allowed the economic use of the TDMA principle in wider applications View full abstract»

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  • MAGNOLIA: a robust, low-cost, shared line rural telephone system

    Page(s): 165 - 170
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    Rural communities, especially those in third world and developing countries, face telecommunications problems such as lack of money, low traffic densities (affecting economic viability), high exposure to lightning, poor or nonexistent infrastructure, etc. There is therefore a need for a simple-to-operate, robust, low-cost, maintainable telecommunication system, allowing access to the rest of the world. The MAGNOLIA system described is a low-cost, shared line (or channel), manual or automatic telephone system. It uses modern technology to implement a robust, in-band signalling system and incorporates features which largely overcome problems traditionally associated with shared line systems. It can operate over any medium capable of transmitting speech, such as radio or PCM. It allows the sharing of costs of the available transmission medium. The author describes the system and its applications View full abstract»

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