Scheduled System Maintenance:
Some services will be unavailable Sunday, March 29th through Monday, March 30th. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Technology for Education in Developing Countries, 2006. Fourth IEEE International Workshop on

Date 10-12 July 2006

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 33
  • Fourth IEEE International Workshop on Technology for Education in Developing Countries [Cover]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1267 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Fourth IEEE International Workshop on Technology for Education in Developing Countries - Title

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): i - iii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (51 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Fourth IEEE International Workshop on Technology for Education in Developing Countries - Copyright

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): iv
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (53 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Fourth IEEE International Workshop on Technology for Education in Developing Countries [Table of contents]

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): v - vii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (46 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Foreword

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): viii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (33 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Technical Program Committee

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): ix
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (31 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An Empirical Study on Education Strategy to E-learning in a Developing Country

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 1 - 2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) has enhanced teaching and learning in developing countries. Educational institutions use ICT as a tool for teaching and learning in a number of ways including but not limited to Internet-based content delivery (an example is blackboard software), visualization by using PowerPoint projector and overhead projector, local area network (LAN) for conducting lessons with the instructor taking control at the server computer. The use of ICT has not been fully explored for delivery of educational services and in particular e-learning. In this paper, we have presented the opinion of the public and education service providers for the future of e-learning in Uganda. In particular we present the interest of students in Web based learning, the category of students who can benefit from e-learning approach, and the present information technology infrastructure that can support e-learning implementation programme in a developing country with Uganda as a case study View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Applying a Twofold Quality Model: Producing Groundwork for System Specific Attribute Models

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 3 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (119 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper applies a twofold quality model, presented in a previous article, to produce groundwork for system and project specific attribute models. Evidence to support the model is sought from a case study of an African EMIS implementation that links the paper to research on information and communication technology for development. The paper is a dense extract from a full article. All visualizations are omitted for the sake of brevity View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Asynch-NET: Footstep for Always-On e-Services in the Rural Areas of Developing Countries: Case Study-Tanzania

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 5 - 6
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (193 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The asynchronous network (Asynch-NET) provided by mobile access point (MAP) in the community of rural areas of developing countries has proved success in many regions of the developing countries. This asynchronous network is the footstep for e-services implementation in the communities with low-income and low population density. Basically, the cost of implementing a conventional "always-on" link in the rural areas of developing countries is very high that does not attract investors to put effort on. The paper presents a technique that is applied to the Asynch-NET framework so as to provide "the always-on" e-services at the similar operating cost of Asynch-NET View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Can the WWW Help to Reduce the Digital Divide? An Example of Cost Effectiveness in Teaching Laboratory Development

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 7 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (166 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present herein a Web server, http://labfmc.eis.uva.es, focused on improving the cost effective in Physics teaching laboratory resources. This can be enable student to use expensive laboratory equipment that is not usually accessible to students. The server has a virtual and a real laboratory controlled through the Web View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Contextual Analysis of Students' Learning during an Introductory ICT Course in Tanzania

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 9 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (169 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An introductory programming course was developed to teach basics of information and communication technology (ICT) at Tumaini University Iringa University College in Tanzania. The course included concretized and contextualized elements to connect the learning with previous experiences and local environment of the students. The course had 27 second year students in the B.Ed. teacher program in mathematics and computer applications. The course lasted three months and included also practical project work. Learning and application ideas of students on ICT were analyzed from the basis of the CATI (contextualize, apply, transfer, import) model. The method in analyses was content analysis. The results show that most of the learning and application ideas are in application level, only some of the students have been able to apply their skills in contextualized level View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Contextualised Design of African I-BLOCKS

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 14 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    We have designed and developed African I-BLOCKS based upon use amongst university students, secondary school pupils and hospitalized children in Tanzania. Using an initial prototype system, the Tanzanian users developed design guidelines for novel African I-BLOCKS to suit the local educational need and context, and these guidelines were used to develop the novel African I-BLOCKS to allow easier building in three dimensions and more reliable connection. The African I-BLOCKS are cubic with full-duplex connectors and magnetic connectors. They allow easy hands-on building of electronic artifacts by any user. The novel African I-BLOCKS were tested by Tanzanian university students (bachelor of education) in a rural hospital and orphanage with positive qualitative evaluation View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Cross-cultural Development and Evaluation: A model for becoming aware of implicit assumptions

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 19 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (175 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the fundamental challenges that each researcher or educator faces is dealing with hidden assumptions they hold. These assumptions place constraints on their perception and expectations (e.g. potentially limiting the kinds of questions they ask), and often put them at a disadvantage when working in foreign contexts. These implicit assumptions deeply influence how they perceive things and how they work. We assert that in our academic and professional discourse, we need to be more aware of and explicit about these assumptions and the ways in which they influence how we see and what we do. In this paper, we provide a basis for this argument and an example of a model that facilitates activity which helps to foster an increased awareness of the hidden assumptions we bring into cross-cultural development and evaluation efforts View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Distance Education in the Maldives: Learner Support for Students in Island Communities

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 24 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Learner support is an essential component of open and distance learning. This paper outlines a learner support system for the students in the islands of Maldives. The learner support system is based on a distance education model designed and developed for Maldives. This learner support system will enable the students to receive more timely feedback to their queries and builds on the existing support system View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Early-stage practicalities of implementing computer aided education: Experience from India

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 26 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (152 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Projects reaching computers to low-income areas to bring some form of technology equity have been in effect since the 1980s. Such initiatives have tended to assume a developmental motivation in the endeavor, especially in poor nations. Investment in such ICTD projects has risen out of a growing faith among state and private agencies that knowledge of computing is an important link in the human development, and that early introduction has important long-term dividends. In this paper, we look at free computing in public schools in rural India. Observing patterns that signify "success" at both the communal and individual levels, this study proposes a framework for studying computer aided learning projects in low-income schools, and raises questions about learning and project organization that researchers in ICT in education may look at for hypotheses generation View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • eLearning and Teacher Training in a Disadvantaged Brazilian Area: a Project to Assess Access, Impact and Quality

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 31 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (155 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper shows the importance of information and communication technologies in the field of education for developing countries. The opportunities they provide for teacher training in disadvantaged areas are outlined and some examples, specific of the Brazilian context, are reported to show the importance of three main issues access, impact and quality. The paper also outlines the BET-K12 project structure stressing how it embeds the above mentioned issues, relevant not only for producing sound researches but also and above all for the effectiveness, the efficiency and the sustainability of activities aimed at promoting development View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • ESL and Learning Technologies in Fast Developing China: Creativity and Innovation toward Beijing Olympics 2008

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 36 - 37
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (106 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Metis Global Network is involved in ESL education, toward humanistic Beijing Olympics 2008. East meets West with ESL in China. It is an important experimental context for intercultural relations. In this paper we use the context of a private Chinese experimental school attached to Beijing University as an interesting setting to capture the complex nature of educational technologies in China, both the positive and the negative. This case study will describe some of the dynamics the relationships between the students, teachers, administrators, and emerging technologies View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High Performance Computing as an Educational Experience well Suited to Developing Nations

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 38 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (190 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Universities are challenged to provide students with a strong practical understanding of technologies, while providing enough hands-on experience to solve real problems. Universities in developing nations have the same challenges as other universities; but are also forced to deal with a lack of technological resources and substandard conditions. One solution is to offer a 'cluster computing' course. Building a cluster requires the integration and application of many technical concepts. Theoretical and technical challenges make it an absorbing and rewarding course. High performance computing was once limited to major institutions with huge funds. Low-cost commodity hardware, free operating systems and faster, lower cost networking and cluster computing concepts have made it possible for institutions at all levels to provide high performance computing to their students and researchers. This paper describes possible methods of teaching cluster computing in a developing nation, given the conditions in most areas and the lack of resources View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • ICT and the transformation of the College of Business Education (CBE)

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 44 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (107 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The College of Business Education is hosting a capacity building project financed on a cost sharing basis between the college, Joensuuu University and the Finnish Embassy, Dar es Salaam. The objective of the project is to strengthen the practical skills of the Tutors in the application of ICT in the colleges' training programmes. The mission statement of the college is to train highly competent and practice-oriented professionals to undertake relevant basic and applied research and to provide consultancy and advisory services to the public. To ensure the mission is achieved, the long-term plan states that, the college will establish a fully fledged department of ICT and strengthen it by training its staff and establishing institutional linkage and strategic cooperation with national, regional and international institutions offering ICT programmes. When the project is completed, the college will be able to offer high quality programmes and courses to its customers which will improve deployability of CBE graduates particularly in the private and public institutions View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Implementing Authentic Activities for supporting learning through remote monitoring of earthquakes

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 46 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (309 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The discovery or re-construction of scientific explanations and understanding based on experience is a complex process, for which school learning often uses shortcuts. Based on the example of analyzing real seismic measurements, we propose a computer-facilitated collaborative learning scenario which meets many of the requirements for authentic learning. The implementation of the learning environment is based on a general platform for supporting collaborative modeling View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • KLAMP an Integrated Open Source Platform for Internet and Mobile Applications

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 51 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (238 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this era of converged information and communication technologies (ICT), one major challenge in using modern technologies to disseminate information generated from the local content is the lack of understanding the technologies and unavailability of appropriate tools that can be used to understand the technology in creating not only Internet applications but also mobile applications. Open source software has brought a much cheaper and easier path to accessing various tools that can be used for learning, and teaching. This paper presents hands on experience of open source tools that can be used to grasp the technologies in the ICT. The integrated architecture referred to as KLAMP, is a combination of tools and gateway that enable Internet and mobile applications to be easily developed. It is not only suitable as a wireless and mobile learning platform but also can be used for large scale projects View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • MOTUS goes to Africa: mobile technologies to increase sustainability of collaborative models for teacher education

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 53 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we outline the research we are currently doing on the usage of mobile and ambient technologies for supporting cooperation in teacher education. Based on this experience, we argue that mobile and wireless technologies can increase the sustainability of cooperative models for teacher education in developing countries. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Open Courseware as a Tool for Teaching and Learning in Africa

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 55 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (107 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Open source software (OSS) shows great promise for future technological innovation and application especially in the area of teaching and learning in Africa. It provides readily available software such as learning management systems (LMS) and learning content management systems (LCMs). Higher learning institutions (HLI) in developing countries can benefit from these OSS initiatives. This paper, based on two case studies (The University of the Western Cape (UWC) in South Africa and the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM) in Tanzania), discusses the application of OSS in teaching and learning and reflects on why the adoption of open courseware (OC) by HLI in Africa is very slow. The UWC Free Software Innovation Unit was visited and information was collected from the Websites of both UWC and UDSM. It is anticipated that the findings of the study will be of interest to all stakeholders in the education sector in Africa. It will be useful when planning cost-effective and efficient technology implementation at district level and at national level specifically in Tanzania View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • School-level ICT Adoption Factors in the Western Cape Schools

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 57 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (169 KB)  

    The ramifications of using information and communication technology (ICT) in education may be the answer to alleviating the educational crisis that South Africa is experiencing. However, the factors that will create a high level of adoption of ICTs in the country's schools haven't been studied, making research in this area vital for project success and sustainability. This project attempts to identify the critical success factors related to ICT interventions in Western Cape schools. In this study the theory of planned behaviour model is used to gain an understanding of decision making processes with regard to ICT use in education. Analysis of the data reveals at school level adoption is affected by availability and accessibility of ICT resources, efficiency of technical support and the influence (attitude) of education leaders View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Technical Expertise Development in Secondary Technical Schools: Effects of ICTenhanced 4C/ID Learning Environments

    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 62 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (143 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This study assessed the effectiveness of powerful learning environments (PLE), developed in line with the specifications of the 4C/ID-model, and the additional effect of ICT for fostering the development of technical expertise in traditional Ghanaian classrooms. The study had a one by one by two pretest posttest quasi experimental design. Three functionally equivalent classes of students from three similar (secondary technical) schools were randomly exposed to three different treatments. The participants consisted of 144 (44, 47, 53) students (mean age was 18.1). The pilot study, served to validate and revise the materials, and to retrain teachers. The main study, consisted of six sessions, conducted in regular classrooms of three schools to test the formulated hypotheses. The results indicate that a 4C/ID PLE promotes the development of technical expertise in secondary technical education better than teaching designed in line with classical instructional design principles. Moreover, results reveal no significant difference of learning gains between the 4C/ID PLE with ICT group and the 4C/ID PLE without ICT group. Finally, the theoretical, research, and practical implications of the results for the instructional design and technology community as well as educational practice are discussed View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.