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AUTOTESTCON '90. IEEE Systems Readiness Technology Conference. 'Advancing Mission Accomplishment', Conference Record.

Date 17-21 Sept. 1990

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 82
  • Conference Record. AUTOTESTCON 90. IEEE Systems Readiness Technology Conference. 'Advancing Mission Accomplishment' (Cat. No.90CH2793-8)

    Publication Year: 1990
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Integrating expert system diagnostics within ATE system software

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 85 - 92
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (580 KB)  

    It is shown that the Westinghouse Expert Diagnostic System (WEDS) Ada provides significant improvements over rule-based expert system shells for diagnostic applications, including a diagnostic-oriented development system and inference engine. By fully integrating the WEDS concepts within a standard Ada ATE (automatic test equipment) system, the expert system has gained more sophisticated operator interfaces, better interfaces with external software, and the ability to communicate with automatic test equipment. In turn, the ATE system has achieved expert system diagnostic capability. This effort provides test personnel using the ATE system with a practical tool to use as a repository for expertise and makes expert diagnostic knowledge available to all technicians in the field and in repair shops. The system also provides facilities for automatically acquiring statistical and historical diagnostic knowledge for both newly designed and previously fielded units under test View full abstract»

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  • Testability for all seasons

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 387 - 394
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    The author discusses the many roles of the testability engineer throughout the development cycle and summarizes successful techniques which have been used on a FSD program. The preplanned use of common BIT (built-in test) software throughout all echelons of maintenance and at the factory is reported. The author identifies many compelling reasons to design for testability, including MIL-STD-2165 compliance. The growing need for BIT and testability designed concurrently with hardware is cited along with the substantial potential for savings in manufacture, life-cycle maintenance, and maintenance support system costs. The role of the testability engineer in the development of a product is shown to be pervasive throughout the project, varied in scope and context, and highly demanding in knowledge and skills View full abstract»

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  • Mobile tester switching subsystem architecture

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 3 - 5
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    The author discusses the overall system architecture of a switching subsystem that can be utilized in a mobile tester environment. It is suggested that a switching subsystem suitable for use in a downsized tester is achievable utilizing VXI. This system will make use of all of the positive attributes of VXI and will supplement them with additional features. Like a VXI system, the switching subsystem should be reconfigurable simply by loading a different complement of switching modules. This system will take advantage of common stimulus/measurement switching while at the same time recognizing that various types of performance paths (such as coaxial, solid, and power) must also be provided. To further reduce the weight, the present interface frame should be eliminated. The subsystem will utilize low insertion force (LIF) hyperbolic interface pins. It is concluded that the concept of universal-like coaxial and solid switching together with a HYPERTAC LIF interface will result in a highly versatile, easily reconfigurable switching subsystem, which will be compatible with the requirements of a downsized tester View full abstract»

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  • Mechanical diagnostics-past, present and future

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 517 - 521
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The background and current trends of the automatic diagnostics of mechanical systems are reviewed. Particular attention is given to a breakthrough in this field involving the introduction of the Mechanical Systems Diagnostic Analyzer in the late 1970s. Further advances in this field are also discussed, with particular emphasis on a reasonably expert system. Scientific-Atlanta's Rotor Analysis and Diagnostic system (RADS-AT), which allows a nonexpert user to quickly bring rotor-induced vibration in helicopters below the accepted level (typically 0.2 in/s.) View full abstract»

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  • Self-improving ATE

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 145 - 152
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (668 KB)  

    The University of Louisville, under contract from the Naval Ordnance Station/Louisville (NOSL), was given the task of exploring the use of artificial intelligence to increase the efficiency of automated test equipment (ATE) used to diagnose faults in low-frequency analog/digital circuit card assemblies (CCA). The authors present an account of the realization of level 1 of a multilevel project organized to accomplish this task. Level 1 concentrates on the design and development of an expert system to guide the ATE through fault-isolation testing. Intelligent computer-aided testing (I-CAT), an expert system, was selected as the nucleus for prototype development and deployment. The primary goal of level 1 was to reduce ATE fault-isolation run time. The static decision, tree previously used to control the ATE was replaced by the dynamic diagnostic strategy of I-CAT, which updates its reasoning by taking into account previous failure rates and reliability data. Node measurements within ambiguity groups are applied to a pattern recognizer to help identify component failures within individual ambiguity groups View full abstract»

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  • FAST: functional avionics system tester

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 7 - 12
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    A description is given of the functional avionics system tester (FAST), which is structured to test weapon replaceable assemblies (WRA) functionally and to make greater use of the WRA built-in-test hardware and software. FAST will be used to test certain WRAs that are part of the avionics upgrade from the F-14D fighter. It will be used in a depot environment until the Consolidated Automated Support System is operational. FAST has a small physical footprint (4-ft wide by 3-ft deep), achieved primarily by its instruments-on-a-board design approach. The FAST test station is described in detail, and block diagrams are provided View full abstract»

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  • Engine monitoring system diagnostics for the TF30-P111 engine

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 567 - 573
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    The development of an engine monitoring system (EMS) for the TF30, a high-bypass afterburning turbofan engine, is reviewed. EMS features providing flight-line diagnostics and improved maintenance troubleshooting capability are described. System design incorporates standard components and technology insertion upgrades such as an MIL-STD-1750A computer. A level-three design package was produced and delivered to the Air Force to be used for competitive procurement of components from multiple sources View full abstract»

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  • A comprehensive design and maintenance environment for test program sets

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 223 - 230
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    A software program called CoMETS (comprehensive design and maintenance environment for test program sets), which gives the test designer a powerful tool to develop test programs free from the encumbrances imposed by the test language and target tester, is discussed. CoMETS uses language-neutral graphical symbols to express the flow of a test sequence, detail the expression of individual tests, create and edit test libraries, etc. An overview of the approach is given, and the characteristics of a good tool set are examined. The CoMETS tool set is described, and a simple test program using CoMETS is considered. The savings realized are discussed, and four scenarios typically encountered in test-program-set development that were readily handled by CoMETS are illustrated View full abstract»

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  • Benefits of intelligent support systems [weapons maintenance]

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 13 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (476 KB)  

    The benefits derived from the intelligent maintenance aid (IMA) project at Emerson Electric Co. are documented by comparing this expert system with traditional test systems. The expert system architecture, methods used for comparison with traditional test systems, and the benefits derived from the expert system implementation are explained. The structure of an artificial intelligence system allows coverage of more failure situations than traditional test programs. This is due to the fact that the rules and knowledge are separate from the inferencing mechanism, allowing the expert system to be adaptive to the current failure situation. Savings of 28% in test program development cost, approximately 47% savings in MTTR (mean time to repair), and 32% reduction in RTOK (retest-okay) rate were calculated using data on the current capabilities of the IMA system View full abstract»

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  • APLS-the European view of CALS

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 373 - 376
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    The author sets forth a European view on CALS (Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistics Support) and its relationship to testability. He outlines reasons why it is time for the United States, Europe, and Japan to coordinate the move towards electronic data interchange (EDI). In addition, he attempts to describe the UK perception of CALS and testability and some of their future implications View full abstract»

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  • A system testability `top-down' apportionment method

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 451 - 463
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (764 KB)  

    The authors present a top-down approach to specifying testability requirements which involves system-level analyses, tradeoffs, and allocation to lower hardware indenture levels. This approach provides guidelines, algorithms, and procedures for computing, assessing, and allocating testability within a new system design. Testability figures of merit (TFOM) used to describe and quantify testability, as applied to a given system, in precise and measurable engineering terms are presented. Testability allocation methods (TAM) to apportion system testability requirements cost effectively through lower levels of indenture to the replaceable unit level and generate subsystem-level requirements are also given. This allocation process starts with the overall testability requirements of a system and prescribes the distribution of these requirements among the various units constituting the system. The TAM problem is formulated as an optimization problem and solved using the augmented Lagrangian method. The complex interactions between the TFOMs and system performance (reliability, availability, maintainability, and life-cycle cost) are derived using analytical, heuristic, experimental, and historical data. A special case where BIT (built-in test) is the resource to be allocated leads to the top-down BIT prioritization View full abstract»

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  • Decision support tools help transition CASS into the fleet

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 405 - 409
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    The authors describe the development of the Consolidated Automated Support System (CASS) whose aim is to provide the US Navy with a suite of standard automatic test equipment (ATE) capable of meeting Navy electronic test requirements through the year 2005. Decisions on how to effectively incorporate CASS into the fleet and maintain its utility are made with the aid of automated decision support tools. The authors describe some of the challenges and problems involved with making the transition from the existing ATE, to one which includes most CASS testers. How a decision support tool such as the System Synthesis Model (SSM) can be used to affect the way in which one allocates, utilizes, and upgrades ATE is demonstrated View full abstract»

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  • Massive monitoring: a methodology to ensure TLM effectiveness [avionics and weapon systems]

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 101 - 104
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    The author examines the concepts of massive monitoring (MM) and two-level maintenance (TLM) and indicates that MM is an appropriate methodology for the realization of TLM. A simplified application example of a typical rudder-control subsystem is presented View full abstract»

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  • Software interoperability-the challenge in VXIbus systems

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 153 - 157
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    The author describes some of the issues, as well as some proposed solutions, which can help to make VXIbus-based test systems as open on the software level as on the hardware level. A significant problem is that VXIbus instruments no longer have a front panel, and the user interface must therefore be implemented using an external graphics software package. Packages available are often mutually exclusive of each other and necessitate the creation of customized drivers for each instrument. An attractive solution lies in defining a set of VXIbus services and interfaces to VXIbus instruments so that each manufacturer only has to write the front panel interface software once, thus saving significant development efforts. Additional advantages of this will be that multiple vendors' front panels can coexist on standardized multitasking workstations, and the standardized interfaces to the instruments make it easy to interface these to programs written in high-level languages. The proposed interfaces are based on existing local area network technologies and, as a by-product, give all instruments access to the client/server capabilities of the network View full abstract»

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  • SMART 608 Interface Connector Assembly-this new standard employs innovative signal distribution and interface techniques

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 493 - 504
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    The airline industry, through ARINC, has undertaken development of the Standard Modular Avionics Repair and Test System (SMART) standard. The SMART standard embraces the 626-ATLAS language development and run-time software along with the SMART 608 Interface Connector Assembly (ICA). The SMART 608 ICA standard employs several innovations, such as low insertion force connectors, a signal distribution backplane. and resource allocation rules, which serve to ensure transportability of the test unit adapter (TUA) interface device. These techniques provide for lower-cost TPS (test program set) adapters, improved resource allocation flexibility, and increased UUT (unit under test) interface signal density. Several aspects of the 608 interface. such as weight, UUT interface density, wear characteristics and fault tolerance, can be advantageous to the new generation of transportable military test systems View full abstract»

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  • A mechanical system condition-based maintenance demonstration model [naval shipboard machinery]

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 529 - 533
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB)  

    The increasing sophistication of naval shipboard machinery coupled with increasing competition for skilled manpower and tightening of defense budgets is forcing the Navy to consider alternative maintenance concepts. One such concept, condition-based maintenance (CBM), is described along with the reasons for its consideration. The concept of such a system integrated into the naval ship environment is described. A program at the David Taylor Research Center (DTRC) is described with particular emphasis on a machinery diagnostic demonstration platform Worthington high-pressure air compressor installed in the laboratory provides a means of effectively demonstrating CBM on an actual shipboard auxiliary. Some near-term plans for the DTRC program are described, and areas for technology development are outlined View full abstract»

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  • Vertical commonality through the use of Ada in ATE systems

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 21 - 26
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (388 KB)  

    The focus of the United States Air Force logistics support is on organic depot support at initial operational capability (IOC), two-level maintenance and factory/field test commonality. It is pointed out that accomplishing these objectives affordably requires changing the current approach to automatic test equipment (ATE) systems development. It is suggested that Ada offers a unique opportunity to have a single-language solution for prime mission equipment (PME) and ATE at all levels of support. The use of Ada provides the framework for reducing software development and integration costs, maximizing reuse of software, achieving factory/field test commonality, and fielding a more mature product at IOC View full abstract»

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  • Enhanced calibration techniques for VXIbus instrumentation

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 123 - 128
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    The author addresses calibration issues of next-generation downsized instrumentation, pointing out that enhancements to traditional calibration techniques need to be investigated and pursued. Hardware and software enhancements to the VXIbus are considered. It is noted in particular that the advent of application-specific integrated circuit technology has allowed the downsizing of conventional test equipment as a first step. But if the ability of an instrument to measure a specified quantity is only as good as how well it is calibrated, then the issue of instrument calibration is one which must be addressed with the same vitality as the initial emphasis on standardizing instrument downsizing View full abstract»

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  • Support environment methodologies for the rapid reprogramming of operational flight programs

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 275 - 280
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB)  

    A description is given of the advanced multi-purpose support environment (AMPSE), a modular support environment used in testing, modifying, verifying, and validating operational flight programs (OFPs). It utilizes distributed processing with multiple common computers communicating over a high-speed real-time network. The hardware and software design uses a modular, building-block approach that has many advantages over traditional architectures. While offering advantages such as reliability, flexibility, reduced acquisition and support costs and reduced size, the most significant advantage of AMPSE is expandability. The AMPSE architectural concept allows computers to be added incrementally as additional processing power is required. This permits new technologies to replace old technologies gradually, thus avoiding the need for expensive upgrade efforts. Most importantly, AMPSE is a base to be built upon to support more sophisticated weapon systems. The authors examine and explain the AMPSE configuration and concept and identify logical extensions into radar/electronic warfare software supportability and automated testing. Issues such as the real-time digital modeling of emitters, jammers, and sensors in order to provide realistic testing of OFPs are addressed View full abstract»

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  • Lessons learned developing organic support for avionics equipment

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 435 - 439
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    The authors summarize some elements of the test program set (TPS) total quality management (TQM) challenge encountered in providing full organic support to the government for an avionics system. The major issues discussed include vertical testability, automatic test equipment (ATE) immaturity, and TPS maturation. The problems encountered, subsequent actions, and lessons learned are addressed. It is concluded that a TQM approach must be employed for the design implementation and development of a successful TPS throughout the life cycle of the TPS View full abstract»

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  • Analytical techniques for diagnostic functional allocation

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 465 - 471
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    The allocation of maintenance system elements to accomplish the diagnostic mission must be optimized to balance performance, size, weight, and cost. The authors discuss techniques used to create a functional dependency model of a subject system and derive an effectiveness and cost model for the diagnostic system. It is concluded that the diagnostic elements of a weapon system may be designed properly through the use of dependency models and adherence to a structured system engineering process. The critical process of functional allocation is the trade-off of diagnostic performance against operational system efficiencies. Models which have been created for this purpose assist the system engineer in the allocation and design processes, document the results for updates and changes, and help to achieve an optimized system design View full abstract»

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  • Advanced diagnostic architecture for JIAWG compliant designs

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 105 - 111
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    An advanced diagnostic architecture which supports JIAWG (Joint Integrated Avionics Working Group) compliant designs is described. The hardware and software diagnostic components for achieving accurate localization of failures and the reestablishment of full system functionality are identified. It is noted that, in order to support the air-land battle concept for the next decade, advanced architectures must employ a comprehensive diagnostic approach for rapid and accurate troubleshooting and fault location of failures that will enable restoration of combat readiness. The advanced diagnostic architecture described identifies many of these approaches View full abstract»

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  • An automatic diagnosis system with fuzzy diagnostic approach for linear analog circuits

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 161 - 165
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    A fuzzy verification diagnostic method is proposed to cope with the element tolerances problem existing in analog-circuit fault diagnosis. The element tolerances are defined as fuzzy sets and these definitions are utilized in the diagnostic equations to incorporate the fault location and evaluation process in order to enhance the robustness of the diagnosis method. An automatic fault-diagnosis system is formed using the automatic test equipment and the proposed fuzzy method. A practical example using the system to diagnose a real circuit is given. Satisfactory results were obtained View full abstract»

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  • Airline get SMART for avionics testing

    Publication Year: 1990 , Page(s): 505 - 508
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    The authors present a technical overview of the SMART (Standard Modular Avionics Repair and Test) architecture and discuss some of the test program development and execution features which are expected to improve productivity and lower costs. SMART provides a standard interface for all SMART testers, instrument interchangeability, and a standard ATLAS test language for test programs. It is concluded that SMART's arrival entail big changes in avionics testing for the airlines and substantial benefits to the entire commercial air transport industry. SMART provides a standardized minimum set of control and support software and an ATE (automatic test equipment) front panel interface View full abstract»

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