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Software Engineering Conference, 2006. Australian

Date 18-21 April 2006

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  • 2006 Australian Software Engineering Conference

    Page(s): c1
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  • Australian Software Engineering Conference - Title

    Page(s): i - iii
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  • Australian Software Engineering Conference - Copyright

    Page(s): iv
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  • Australian Software Engineering Conference - Table of contents

    Page(s): v - ix
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  • Message from the General Chair

    Page(s): x
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  • Message from the Research Program Chairs

    Page(s): xi
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  • Organizing Committee

    Page(s): xii
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  • Program Committee

    Page(s): xii
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  • Research Program Committee

    Page(s): xiii
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  • Industry Program Committee

    Page(s): xiv
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  • Additional reviewers

    Page(s): xv
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  • Software product lines: reuse that makes business sense

    Page(s): 1 pp. - 3
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    Summary form only given. Traditionally, software-intensive systems have been acquired, developed, tested, and maintained as separate products, even if these systems have a significant amount of common functionality and code. Such an approach wastes technical resources, takes longer, and costs more than necessary. A product line approach to software can reduce development cycles, improve return on software investments, improve software system integration, and give an organization more future options. Building a new product or system becomes more a matter of assembly or generation than creation, of integration rather than programming. Organizations of all types and sizes are discovering that a product line strategy, when skillfully implemented, can improve productivity, quality, and time to market. Software product lines present at long last a reuse strategy with real economic benefit. Making the move to product lines, however, is a business and technical decision and requires considerable changes in the way organizations practice software engineering, technical management, and organizational management. This article explores the basic concepts of software product lines, share experience reports from companies employing the paradigm, and explore the software engineering and management practices necessary to develop a successful software product line View full abstract»

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  • State of the art v state of the practice: a personal perspective on the changes in the Australian software engineering landscape

    Page(s): 1 pp. - 4
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    Summary form only given. The Global Software Industry has undergone some dramatic changes. From the high tech bubble of late 1990's, to the tech crash of 2001, to the globalisation of IT services, to the beginning of utility computing, to most recently the impact of governance regulations such as Sarbannes Oxley. The Australian software industry has also been dramatically affected by these global changes. These changes have impacted the structure of market for software engineering services, changed the willingness of investors to enter the software engineering market and changed the nature of the demand for, and the suppliers of, software engineering services. All these changes have had significant impacts on the state of practice of software engineering - some good, some not so good. This presentation provides a personal view of these changes and how they have affected the state of practice of software engineering in the Australian market. In particular the presentation looks at how attempts to undertake process improvement have changed over this time. Specific examples of our own work in deploying a state of the art software development process, Process Mentor, to software companies large and small provides the backdrop to these discussions View full abstract»

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  • The software engineering academy's role in industrial innovation

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    Summary form only given. Universities are under increasing pressure globally to both diversify revenue streams, and develop a role beyond simply teaching and research and, particularly in the technological disciplines such as our own, to act as agents for economic development and change. This diversification of roles naturally creates tensions between investigator led curiosity driven research and applied research that has the potential for more immediate economic impact. The introduction of research quality measurement frameworks such as those in New Zealand and Australia exacerbate this tension. In this article, the author gives a personal perspective on how these tensions can be mitigated, in the process generating a win-win partnership with industry. This requires compromises on both sides of the industry academic divide but can be immensely rewarding in both an academic and a financial sense. The author use case studies from his own group's work to illustrate, focusing on a software engineering research project that has resulted in a very successful product development with strong economic and academic outcomes, and an internship which resulted in creation of a new spinoff company. He, in addition, discuss some of the current initiatives we have underway at Auckland to further develop industry partnerships. View full abstract»

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  • An agile approach to support incremental development of requirements specifications

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (336 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of requirements specifications has to face the imprecise and changeable knowledge available about the desired systems at the early stages of development. In this paper, we take advantage of that changeability to introduce an agile approach that helps identify suitable evolutions of a specification. This approach provides a solution with low computational cost to achieve frequent interaction with the stakeholders, this being the key to support the eminently creative task of developing requirements specifications. View full abstract»

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  • Requirements capture and specification for enterprise applications: a UML based attempt

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    We propose a software development method for enterprise applications that combines the use of the structural concepts provided by problem frames, and the use of the UML notation. Problem frames are patterns that provide a precise conceptual model of what is the problem to be solved. The first step of our method is to match the current task with one of the problem frames that we propose for enterprise applications, and this helps to understand the nature of the problem under study. The problem frames to be considered for enterprise applications are clearly more complex than the basic ones. We then provide guidelines to develop all the artifacts required by the method through a dedicated choice of appropriate UML diagrams together with predefined schemas or skeletons for their contents. Thus, using our method provides a more direct path to the UML models, which saves time (no long questions about which diagrams to use and how) and improves the models quality (relevant issues are addressed, a uniform style is offered). In this paper, we consider the phases of modelling the domain, the requirements capture and specification, and their relationships. View full abstract»

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  • Proposed notation for exception handling in UML 2 sequence diagrams

    Page(s): 10 pp. - 40
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    We present a way to handle exceptions in sequence diagrams. The proposal is inspired by the UML 2 Testing Profiles (U2TP) default mechanism and introduces the use of multiple logical levels of sequence diagrams and what we call dynamic gate matching. The suggested notation distinguishes exception flow from the normal flow of control, creating a visual separation, and providing a way of handling exceptions in both single threaded programs and multi threaded programs. The proposed mechanisms are underpinned by trace semantics View full abstract»

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  • Compatibility test for coordination aspects of software components

    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Combining third party software components to customer-individual application systems requires first, standardized specification techniques for describing the technical as well as the business-related aspects of the services provided and required by the corresponding software components and second, automated compatibility tests in order to identify components fulfilling demands specified by component requestors. Adequate techniques for the specification of component services are consolidated in a multilayered specification framework, where formal notations are preferred in order to enable the execution of automated compatibility tests. These tests are a prerequisite for the existence of component markets where third party software components are traded and components that fulfil the specified demands are identified. This paper presents an algorithm for the layer of the specification framework where coordination aspects of a software component are described. On this layer an extension of the object constraint language (OCL) by temporal operators is used to specify the succession relationships between the services of related software components. Thereby the connections to other layers are tagged and existing tests are integrated. View full abstract»

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  • A framework for checking behavioral compatibility for component selection

    Page(s): 10 pp. - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (311 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Component selection and composition are the main issues in component-based development (CBD). Existing approaches suffer from the problem that the components retrieved usually do not exactly fit with other components in the system being developed. While formal methods can be used to describe and check semantic characteristics to better match components, there are practical limitations which restrict their adoption. In this paper, we propose a framework to support a semantic description and selection of components. Towards this we first introduce a Simple Component Interface Language (SCIL). SCIL files can be translated to a variety of models including those that have a formal basis. We report our experience with two specific tools, viz., Reactive Modules and Alloy with a view to using tools based on formal methods but without exposing the details of the tools View full abstract»

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  • SwinDeW-S: extending P2P workflow systems for adaptive composite Web services

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    SwinDeW, an innovative decentralised workflow management system, has established an underlying framework for peer-to-peer (P2P) based business process coordination environments. SwinDeW-S extends SwinDeW to support adaptive composite service orchestration in the era of service-oriented computing. This paper comprehensively presents features of SwinDeW-S, including the P2P network establishment, the messaging mechanism, the service deployment and enactment, the service discovery and advertisement, and the service flow execution. The prototypical extension of SwinDeW to SwinDeW-S and the advantages of SwinDeW-S are also examined and analysed. With the innovative integration of service and P2P-based enterprise application techniques, SwinDeW-S can support composite service orchestration, deployment and execution. View full abstract»

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  • A runtime monitoring and validation framework for Web service interactions

    Page(s): 10 pp. - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (294 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Web services are designed for composition and use by third parties through dynamic discovery. As such, the issue of interoperability between services is of great importance to ensure that the services can work together towards the overall application goals. In particular, the interaction protocols of a service need to be implemented and used properly so that the service composition can conduct itself in an orderly fashion. In our previous work, we have proposed a lightweight, pattern/constraint-based approach to specifying service interaction protocols. It has been incorporated into OWL-S for service developers to describe service interaction constraints. In this paper, we present a framework for monitoring the run-time interaction behaviour of Web services and validating the behaviour against their pre-defined interaction constraints. The framework involves interception of service interactions/messages, representation of interaction constraints using finite state automata, and conformance checking of service interactions against interaction constraints. As such, the framework provides a useful tool for validating the implementation and use of services regarding their interaction behaviour View full abstract»

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  • Checking conformance between business processes and Web service contract in service oriented applications

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    A key challenge to widespread adoption of service oriented architectures and supporting Web services technologies is the issue of maintaining consistency of interacting, long running, autonomous business processes that constitute distributed applications, in the presence of application level failures, concurrent activities and other exceptional events. One of the main sources of inconsistency is the non-conformance between business processes and their external behaviors, expressed through service contracts. Today, the onus is on the programmers to write complex code to handle such non-conformance due to shortcomings in supporting tools and technologies. This paper addresses this problem in the context of consistency requirements, firstly, by describing the relationships between the business process workflow and Web service contracts, and then by providing a prototype tool that checks the conformance between them. View full abstract»

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  • A coordinated architecture for the agent-based service level agreement negotiation of Web service composition

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    Recent progress in the field of Web services has made it possible to integrate inter-organizational and heterogeneous services on the Web at runtime. If a user request cannot be satisfied by a single Web service, it is (or should be) possible to combine existing services in order to fulfill the request. However, there are several challenging issues that need to be addressed before this can be realized in the true sense. One of them is the ability to ensure end-to-end QoS of a Web service composition. There is a need for a SLA negotiation system which can ensure the autonomous QoS negotiation of Web service compositions irrespective of the application domain. In this paper we propose agent-based coordinated-negotiation architecture to ensure collective functionality, end-to-end QoS and the stateful coordination of complex services. We describe a prototype implementation to demonstrate how this architecture can be used in different application domains. We have also demonstrated how the negotiation system on the service provider's side can be implemented both as an agent based negotiation system and as a Web service based negotiation system. View full abstract»

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  • Optimising Web services performance with table driven XML

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    The performance of the SOAP protocol has often been regarded relatively poor and requiring undue amounts of processor time, storage and bandwidth due to its use of text-based, metadata-laden XML encoding. There are many proposals available to tackle this perceived problem, however none of these coherently consider the different aspects of the problem: (1) message size; (2) message structure; (3) accessing individual elements; and (4) interoperability with other Web services protocols. The technique proposed in this paper: Table driven XML (TDXML) takes such a coherent view and offers more compact messages, simpler message structure and easier access to individual elements when compared to conventional SOAP. TDXML also enables keyed access to individual elements to enable single pass message parsing for improved object serialisation and deserialisation. Experimental studies show that TDXML can be incorporated easily into a commercially available SOAP implementation with 30% improved latency performance. Furthermore, this paper reports that TDXML can also be implemented with other transport mechanisms and provide even better performance (over 100%) than SOAP in regard to network bandwidth and latency. View full abstract»

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  • Design of agent-oriented pattern templates

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    Software patterns have potential to enhance the comprehension, application and communication of agent oriented software concepts. To realize this potential, agent oriented patterns should be appropriately described with the aid of good pattern templates. However, many of the existing descriptions of agent patterns lack certain features that are critical to the description of agent patterns. In this paper, we present a design for agent oriented pattern templates. We present two templates built according to our design that we believe improve on the description of agent patterns. The InteRRaP agent architectural pattern and Contract Net agent interaction pattern are presented using these templates. View full abstract»

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