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Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology, 2005. 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on

Date 12-15 May 2005

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  • 2005 3rd IEEE/EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnology in Medicine and Biology (IEEE Cat. No. 05EX937)

    Publication Year: 2005
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  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): i
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  • Copyright page

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): ii
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  • Program messages

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): iii
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  • Editor's notes

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): iv
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  • Schedule/agenda

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): v
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  • Schedule/agenda

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): vi
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  • Schedule/agenda

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): vii - ix
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  • Conference committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): x - xi
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  • Keynote address

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xiii - xv
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    Provides an abstract for each of the keynote presentations and a brief professional biography of each presenter. The complete presentations were not made available for publication as part of the conference proceedings. View full abstract»

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  • Other messages

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xvi - xvii
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  • Indexes

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xxi - xxxii
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xxxiii - xliv
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  • Nanoshuttles driven by biological motors

    Publication Year: 2005
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (128 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Biological motors are used by cells to actively transport ions and molecules against concentrations thereby establishing non-equilibrium conditions that are essential for many life processes. Borrowing from nature, we are developing insights into how to engineer nanoscale transport systems based on the biological motors kinesin and microtubules. Molecular shuttle systems may enhance the detection efficiency of analytical microfluidic systems or facilitate the controlled assembly of sophisticated nanostructures if transport can be coordinated along complex track networks. Methods have been developed to control the speed of the nanoshuttles with light, and we evaluated how various synthetic polymers affect the lifetime of these biomolecules embedded in integrated hybrid devices. We could also show that kinesin-driven transport can be utilized to drive the self-assembly of mesoscopic structures that would not form in the absence of active transport. View full abstract»

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  • Opportunities for microtechnology in ion channel research

    Publication Year: 2005
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Ion channels are proteins in cell membranes that act as molecular switches and transducers, controlling currents of ions in response to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimuli. The two major problems in ion channel research for which new microdevices are needed are described. The first is the need for better "patch clamp" recordings of ion channel currents in living cells. The second problem is the determination of the structure of ion channels (and other membrane proteins) by electron cryomicroscopy, an alternative to X-ray crystallography. From many images of different views of the protein particles, a 3D reconstruction can be obtained. View full abstract»

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  • Insulating dielectrophoresis for the continuous separation and concentration of Bacillus subtilis

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 3 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2144 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a novel microdevice for the dielectrophoretic manipulation of particles and cells for sample preparation and analysis. A two level isotropic etch of a glass substrate was used to create insulating ridges in micron sized channels. These ridges created a non-uniform field when a direct current field was applied across the channel and the dielectrophoretic force that resulted from the ridge was used to manipulate particles. We show the continuous concentration and separation of Bacillus subtilis from a two component sample mixture. When the applied voltage is at or above 30V/mm the flow of Bacillus subtilis was restricted to the central channel as a result of negative DEP away from the field concentration produced by the insulating ridges. Under the same applied electric fields the 200-nm polystyrene particles DEP away from the insulating ridges was negligible for the 200-nm particles, which flowed uninhibited down the three exit channels. View full abstract»

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  • Multi-DNA extraction chip based on an aluminum oxide membrane integrated into a PDMS microfluidic structure

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 5 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1744 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel microfluidic DNA extraction system was designed and fabricated using an AOM (aluminum oxide membrane) capture surface sandwiched between PDMS microfluidic channels in a parallel format. The completed system was tested with Lambda DNA mixed with the fluorescence dye SYBR Green I. Following extraction, the surface of AOM was examined with fluorescence microscopy while still embedded in the microfluidic system. Successful extraction and immobilization of DNA on the AOM was observed in almost every separation chamber. This microsystem has potential applications in high-throughput DNA extraction and analysis, with the capability to be integrated into polymer-based microfluidics systems. View full abstract»

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  • Continuous plasma separation from whole blood using microchannel geometry

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 8 - 9
    Cited by:  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1912 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Plasma separation from whole blood using microfluidics was investigated. We suggested modified channel geometry called "corner-edge" to enhance plasma skimming effect at branching channel. To evaluate separation efficiency, microfluidic chip was fabricated with silicone elastomer and glass. The efficiency of separation was above 99% comparing with whole blood hematocrit. This microfluidic unit could be integrated with microchannel network for lab-on-a-chip applications such as immunoassay. View full abstract»

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  • Improving DNA microarray hybridization with a pulsed source-sink mixing device

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1552 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A fundamental study of fluid mixing is used to guide the design of a hybridization chamber for DNA microarray analysis. The focus is on a system consisting of a simple arrangement of flow sources and sinks that efficiently delivers targets across a conventional glass slide array using a series of flow pulses. A quantification of chaotic advection in a reduced-order flow model suggests that optimal results for this system will be obtained when each flow pulse exchanges approximately 35-45% of the chamber fluid volume. Hybridization experiments were conducted for a relative pulse volume of approximately 40% across a microarray printed with a pattern of 102 identical probe spots containing a 65-mer oligonucleotide capture probe. Hybridization of a 725-bp fluorescently labeled target was used to quantify target hybridization levels. Relative to a conventional 24-hour static hybridization, a 1-hour mixing-based analysis was found to produce an increase in signal intensity and a reduction in spot-to-spot signal variation. View full abstract»

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  • Microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter with hydrodynamic flow manipulation

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 13 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2120 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Presented is a novel flow manipulation and particle detection method for microfabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter (μFACS). With hydrodynamic flow manipulation, our system guarantees fast and robust operation while sorting fluorescent particles. Moreover by detecting with synchronized imaging, we also developed an on-line calibration technique for accurate timing between detection and actuation. View full abstract»

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  • Dual capillary electrophoresis devices with electrochemical detection on a single platform

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 15 - 17
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2040 KB)  

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a single lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platform capable of performing dual, simultaneous separation and detection of multiple analytes. Computational modeling was performed to determine optimum device geometry and performance. The soda-lime glass-based device was fabricated using traditional microtechnology processes, including UV photolithography, buffered oxide etch (BOE), electrode deposition and compression thermal bonding. The device was characterized with a mixture of dopamine (2mM) and catechol (2mM) in a phosphate buffer (20mM, 6.5 pH). Modeling results yielded migration velocities of 0.6 mm/s and 0.42 mm/s for dopamine (electrokinetic (EK) mobility=60,000 μm2/V·s) and catechol (EK mobility=42,000 μm2/V·s), respectively. Experimental results obtained from microchips exhibiting the same EK mobilities demonstrated identical electropherograms in both detection channels with migration velocities of 0.58 mm/s for dopamine and 0.41 mm/s for catechol. View full abstract»

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  • Lab-on-a-chip systems with three dimensional microelectrodes

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 18 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    This paper reports on the development and testing of a self-contained portable electrochemical (EC) detection platform capable of monitoring heavy metals (Pb, Cu etc.). Towards this end, a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device was fabricated by etching a microchannel system into a soda lime glass substrate and incorporating photo-lithographically patterned radial gold microelectrodes at the end of the designated separation channel. The first pair of electrodes was modified into a single 3D microelectrode whose high surface area is ideal for effective pre-concentration of metals ions in a sample stream, while the other 2 pairs were unmodified and used as planar "sensing" electrodes. Proper control of plating and stripping voltages at the 3D microelectrode yielded initial pre-concentration and subsequent release of Cu2+ ions, which were then detected downstream at the one of the planar electrodes. View full abstract»

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  • Open environment micro device for integration of patch clamp instrumentation with targeted microfluidic chemical delivery

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 22 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3896 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We describe a technique for the fabrication and use of a microfluidic flow device that has portions that are open to the external environment. Matching inlet and outlet flow rates in the device forms virtual walls through surface tension at the liquid-air interface. Traditional instrumentation, such as the patch-clamp pipette, can be introduced into the flow stream through the surface-tension walls, thereby combining decades of electrophysiology techniques with the benefits of microfluidic environmental control of in-vitro tissue samples such as neural cultures and brain slices. View full abstract»

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  • Influence of oxygen microenvironment on microfluidic glucose sensor performance

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 26 - 27
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1040 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose a novel method to overcome significant problems of baseline drift and sensitivity degradation in amperometric biosensors based on oxidase enzyme reactions. A novel glucose microsensor with a built-in electrochemical oxygen manipulation microsystem is introduced to demonstrate three novel functionalities; one-point in situ self-calibration (zero-point), broadening of dynamic range and increase in sensitivity. The influence of electrochemically generated oxygen microenvironment on the sensor output within a fluidic structure is investigated. View full abstract»

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  • Automated multiplexed multidensity microfluidic (M3) cell sensing based on electrical gain measurements

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 28 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2472 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present the preparation of multi-density cells automated in a microfluidic channel and then sensed with multiplexed surface microelectrode arrays at the bottom of the channel. Decreasing concentrations of cells are prepared by mixing decreasing volumes of cells with increasing volumes of cell culture media. The different cell concentrations are separated by oil blocks. The fluids are driven into the channel by three computer-controlled syringe pumps and Bode plot of the network formed the cells are generated continuously. The monitoring of the cells is carried out as the maxima of the Bode plot are plotted with respect to time showing the kinetics of cell growth. As an initial result, this monitoring is done for three sets of concentration of cells using glass/PDMS wells simultaneously. Preparation of different densities of cells is carried out by adjusting the ration of flow of the cells and media in a microchannel using a computer controlled syringe pumps system. For the conference, we will present the growth patterns of 16 density cells in order to study the effect of initial concentration on the cell growth of three different types of cells. View full abstract»

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