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Software Reliability Engineering, 2005. ISSRE 2005. 16th IEEE International Symposium on

Date 8-11 Nov. 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 47
  • Proceedings. 16th IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): c1
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  • 16th IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering - Title Page

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): i - iii
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  • 16th IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering - Copyright Page

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): iv
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  • 16th IEEE International Symposium on Software Reliability Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): v - viii
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  • Welcome from the General Co-Chairs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): ix
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  • Welcome from the Program Committee Co-Chairs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): x
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  • Organizing Committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xi
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  • Program Committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xii
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  • How Should Software Reliability Engineering Be Taught?

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 3
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  • Teaching SRE to software practitioners

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 pp. - 4
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  • Teaching an active-participation university course in software reliability and testing

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 pp. - 5
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  • Software development SRE needs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 pp. - 6
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  • Teaching SRE in a diverse graduate student context

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 pp. - 7
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  • Designing an SRE program for commercial software organizations

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 1 pp. - 8
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  • Benchmarking the dependability of Windows and Linux using PostMark/spl trade/ workloads

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1252 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a dependability benchmark for general-purpose operating systems and its application to six versions of Windows operating system and four versions of Linux operating system. The benchmark measures are: operating system robustness (as regards possible erroneous inputs provided by the application software to the operating system via the application programming interface), reaction and restart times in the presence of faults. The workload is PostMark, a file system performance benchmark for operating systems View full abstract»

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  • Safety analysis of software product lines using state-based modeling

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (205 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The analysis and management of variations (such as optional features) are central to the development of safety-critical, software product lines. However, the difficulty of managing variations, and the potential interactions among them, across an entire product line currently hinders safety analysis in such systems. The work described here contributes to a solution by integrating safety analysis of a product line with model-based development. This approach provides a structured way to construct a state-based model of a product line having significant, safety-related variations. The process described here uses and extends previous work on product-line software fault tree analysis to explore hazard-prone variation points. The process then uses scenario-guided executions to exercise the state model over the variations as a means of validating the product-line safety properties. Using an available tool, relationships between behavioral variations and potentially hazardous states are systematically explored and mitigation steps are identified. The paper uses a product line of embedded medical devices to demonstrate and evaluate the process and results View full abstract»

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  • Helping end-users "engineer" dependable Web applications

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (426 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    End-user programmers are increasingly relying on Web authoring environments to create Web applications. Although often consisting primarily of Web pages, such applications are increasingly going further, harnessing the content available on the Web through "programs" that query other Web applications for information to drive other tasks. Unfortunately, errors can be pervasive in Web applications, impacting their dependability. This paper reports the results of an exploratory study of end-user Web application developers, performed with the aim of exposing prevalent classes of errors. The results suggest that end-users struggle the most with the identification and manipulation of variables when structuring requests to obtain data from other Web sites. To address this problem, we present a family of techniques that help end user programmers perform this task, reducing possible sources of error. The techniques focus on simplification and characterization of the data that end-users must analyze while developing their Web applications. We report the results of an empirical study in which these techniques are applied to several popular Web sites. Our results reveal several potential benefits for end-users who wish to "engineer" dependable Web applications View full abstract»

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  • Large empirical case study of architecture-based software reliability

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (250 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we present an empirical study of architecture-based software reliability based on a large open source application which consists of 350,000 lines of C code. The goals of our study are to analyze empirically the adequacy, applicability, and accuracy of architecture-based software reliability models. For this purpose we developed innovative approaches to efficiently extract and more accurately analyze a large amount of empirical data. Applying the theoretical results on a large scale field study allows us to test how and when they work, to understand their limitations, and outline the issues that need attention in the future research studies. Thus, our results show that for a subset of failures which can clearly be attributed to single components, both the composite and hierarchical models are very accurate when compared to the actual reliability. However, the assumptions made by the existing architecture-based software reliability models do not allow accounting for the remaining failures which led to fixing faults in multiple components. These results show that in order to progress further, software reliability engineering should go through cycles of building models, testing them empirically, learning from the experiments, and refining the models to capture the newly discovered phenomena View full abstract»

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  • Error propagation in the reliability analysis of component based systems

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (166 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Component based development is gaining popularity in the software engineering community. The reliability of components affects the reliability of the system. Different models and theories have been developed to estimate system reliability given the information about system architecture and the quality of the components. Almost always in these models a key attribute of component-based systems, the error propagation between the components, is overlooked and not taken into account in the reliability prediction. We extend our previous work on Bayesian reliability prediction of component based systems by introducing the error propagation probability into the model. We demonstrate the impact of the error propagation in a case study of an automated personnel access control system. We conclude that error propagation may have a significant impact on the system reliability prediction and, therefore, future architecture-based models should not ignore it View full abstract»

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  • Study of the impact of hardware fault on software reliability

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (267 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As software plays increasingly important roles in modern society, reliable software becomes desirable for all stakeholders. One of the root causes of software failure is the failure of the computer hardware platform on which the software resides. Traditionally, fault injection has been utilized to study the impact of these hardware failures. One issue raised with respect to the use of fault injection is the lack of prior knowledge on the faults injected, and the fact that, as a consequence, the failures observed may not represent actual operational failures. This paper proposes a simulation-based approach to explore the distribution of hardware failures caused by three primary failure mechanisms intrinsic to semiconductor devices. A dynamic failure probability for each hardware unit is calculated. This method is applied to an example Z80 system and two software segments. The results lead to the conclusion that the hardware failure profile is location related, time dependent, and software-specific View full abstract»

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  • Prioritize code for testing to improve code coverage of complex software

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (163 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Code prioritization for testing promises to achieve the maximum testing coverage with the least cost. This paper presents an innovative method to provide hints on which part of code should be tested first to achieve best code coverage. This method claims two major contributions. First it takes into account a "global view" of the execution of a program being tested, by considering the impact of calling relationship among methods/functions of complex software. It then relaxes the "guaranteed" condition of traditional dominator analysis to be "at least" relationship among dominating nodes, which makes dominator calculation much simpler without losing its accuracy. It also then expands this modified dominator analysis to include global impact of code coverage, i.e. the coverage of the entire software other than just the current function. We implemented two versions of code prioritization methods, one based on original dominator analysis and the other on relaxed dominator analysis with global view. Our comparison study shows that the latter is consistently better in terms of identifying code for testing to increase code coverage View full abstract»

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  • Providing test quality feedback using static source code and automatic test suite metrics

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 94
    Cited by:  Papers (2)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (177 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A classic question in software development is "How much testing is enough?" Aside from dynamic coverage-based metrics, there are few measures that can be used to provide guidance on the quality of an automatic test suite as development proceeds. This paper utilizes the software testing and reliability early warning (STREW) static metric suite to provide a developer with indications of changes and additions to their automated unit test suite and code for added confidence that product quality will be high. Retrospective case studies to assess the utility of using the STREW metrics as a feedback mechanism were performed in academic, open source and industrial environments. The results indicate at statistically significant levels the ability of the STREW metrics to provide feedback on important attributes of an automatic test suite and corresponding code View full abstract»

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  • Improving statechart testing criteria using data flow information

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (158 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Empirical studies have shown there is wide variation in cost (e.g., of devising and executing test cases) and effectiveness (at finding faults) across existing state-based coverage criteria. As these criteria can be considered as executing the control flow structure of the statechart, we are attempting to investigate how data flow information can be used to improve their cost-effectiveness. This article presents a comprehensive methodology to perform data flow analysis of UML statecharts, applies it to the round-trip path (transition tree) coverage criterion and reports on two case studies. The results of the case studies show that dataflow information can be used to select the best cost-effective transition tree when more than one satisfies the transition tree criterion. We further propose a more optimal strategy for the transition tree criterion, in terms of cost and effectiveness. The improved tree strategy is evaluated through the two case studies and the results suggest that it is a cost-effective strategy that would fit into many practical situations View full abstract»

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  • Assessing the crash-failure assumption of group communication protocols

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 116
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (246 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Designing and correctly implementing group communication systems (GCSs) is notoriously difficult. Assuming that processes fail only by crashing provides a powerful means to simplify the theoretical development of these systems. When making this assumption, however, one should not forget that clean crash failures provide only a coarse approximation of the effects that errors can have in distributed systems. Ignoring such a discrepancy can lead to complex GCS-based applications that pay a large price in terms of performance overhead yet fail to deliver the promised level of dependability. This paper provides a thorough study of error effects in real systems by demonstrating an error-injection-driven design methodology, where error injection is integrated in the core steps of the design process of a robust fault-tolerant system. The methodology is demonstrated for the Fortika toolkit, a Java-based GCS. Error injection enables us to uncover subtle reliability bottlenecks both in the design of Fortika and in the implementation of Java. Based on the obtained insights, we enhance Fortika's design to reduce the identified bottlenecks. Finally, a comparison of the results obtained for Fortika with the results obtained for the OCAML-based Ensemble system in a previous work, allows us to investigate the reliability implications that the choice of the development platform (Java versus OCAML) can have View full abstract»

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  • PORT: a price-oriented reliable transport protocol for wireless sensor networks

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 10 pp. - 126
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (185 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In wireless sensor networks, to obtain reliability and minimize energy consumption, a dynamic rate-control and congestion-avoidance transport scheme is very important. We notice that reporting packets may contribute to the sink's fidelity of its knowledge on the phenomenon of interest to different extents. Thus, reliability cannot simply be measured by the sink's total incoming packet rate as considered in current schemes. Also, communication costs between sources and the sink may be different and may change dynamically. Based on these considerations, we propose PORT (price-oriented reliable transport protocol) to facilitate the sink to achieve reliability. Under the constraint that the sink must obtain enough fidelity for reliability purpose, PORT minimizes energy consumption with two schemes. One is based on the sink's application-based optimization approach that feeds back the optimal reporting rates. The other is a locally optimal routing scheme according to the feedback of downstream communication conditions. PORT can adapt well to the communication conditions for energy saving while maintaining the necessary level of reliability. Simulation results in an application case study demonstrate the effectiveness of PORT View full abstract»

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