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Requirements Engineering, 2005. Proceedings. 13th IEEE International Conference on

Date Aug. 29 2005-Sept. 2 2005

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  • Proceedings. 13th IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering

    Publication Year: 2005
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  • 13th IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering - Title Page

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): i - iii
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  • 13th IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering - Copyright

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): iv
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  • 13th IEEE International Conference on Requirements Engineering - Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): v - ix
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  • Message from the Chairs

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): x
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  • Conference Committee

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xi - xii
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  • Supporting organisations

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xiii
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  • RE 2006

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): xiv
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  • Dependable software: an oxymoron?

    Publication Year: 2005
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    Summary form only given. Can software really be made dependable? And if it was, would we be able to recognize it? For the last two years, the author had been chairing a study of the National Academy of Sciences on dependable software, and have had the opportunity to hear - in a workshop held last year, and in open sessions of the committee - anecdotes and viewpoints that have often surprised him. The conclusions of the committee are not made public until the final report is out. In this talk, therefore, some of the things heard are shared, and draw some connections to requirements engineering. View full abstract»

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  • The role of information systems within corporate strategy and management policies new challenges

    Publication Year: 2005
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    Summary form only given. Until now, IT engineers, and particularly project teams working to tight deadlines, have felt that they are little more than IT masons, with no clear overall vision of what they are on. Today they have to become bona fide architects, which take time. It is also necessary to federate - within a department in charge of IT landscaping and functional architecture - the IT architecture skills which define the overall corporate model and ensure interoperability between information systems. This high level team then constructs a global vision, and guarantees coherence between the various system components through direct involvement in making important, formative decisions such as drawing up benchmark reference systems and defining projects. View full abstract»

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  • Exemplars for better requirements - tales from the trenches

    Publication Year: 2005
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    Summary form only given. Good requirements don't just happen; they come from effective practices. And effective practices come from distillation of experience. In her job as a consultant Suzanne Robertson has worked on a wide variety of projects in diverse socio-technical domains. She has had the opportunity to discover good practices by examining the way that successful requirements projects are run and by identifying patterns of behaviour that are common to those projects. This talk is about these requirements exemplars - patterns to emulate - that she has distilled from experience with projects in many different cultures. The talk reviews a selection of requirements exemplars such as: requirements foundation (what's the best base?); product in parallel (two different scopes?); knowledge versus documents (which is which?); rooms with walls (why bother?); maximum disruption (why cause chaos?); linguistic integrity (what language do we speak?); eating the orange (which knife to use?); the waiting room (now or later?); and Lewis and Clark (when to explore the unknown?). Examples from real projects support the discussion along with ideas for how to make use of exemplars in your own environment. View full abstract»

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  • Configuring common personal software: a requirements-driven approach

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 9 - 18
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We investigate the personalization capabilities of common personal software systems. We use a typical e-mail client as an example of such a system, and examine the configuration screens it offers to its users. We discover that each configuration value reflects each of the ways with which the user goals can be satisfied. Thus, we construct a goal model in which alternative ways for satisfying high level goals are matched with alternative system configurations. This way, automatic configuration of the system by reasoning about the overlaying goal model can be achieved. We find that the vast majority of the configuration options that refer to system functionality can be configured using this method, facilitating thereby the personalization tasks for users with no technical background, and ensuring, at the same time, consistency and meaningfulness in the configuration result. View full abstract»

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  • Personal and contextual requirements engineering

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 19 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A framework for requirements analysis is proposed that accounts for individual and personal goals and the effect of time and context on personal requirements. The implications of the framework on system architecture are considered as three implementation pathways: functional specifications, development of customisable features and automatic adaptation by the system. These pathways imply the need to analyse system architecture requirements. Different implementation pathways have cost-benefit implications for stakeholders, so cost-benefit analysis techniques are proposed to assess tradeoffs between goals and implementation strategies. The use of the framework is illustrated with two case studies in assistive technology domains: e-mail and a personalised navigation system. View full abstract»

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  • An approach to constructing feature models based on requirements clustering

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 31 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (648 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Feature models have been widely adopted in software reuse to organize the requirements of a set of similar applications in a software domain/product line. However, in most feature-oriented methods, the construction of feature models heavily depends on the domain analysts' personal understanding, and the work of constructing feature models from the original requirements of sample applications is often tedious and ineffective. This paper proposes a semiautomatic approach to constructing feature models based on requirements clustering, which automates the activities of feature identification, organization and variability modeling to a great extent. The underlying idea of this approach is to analyze the relationships between individual requirements and cluster tight-related requirements into features. With the automatic support of this approach, good quality feature models can be constructed in a more effective way. A case study is also provided to show the feasibility of this approach. View full abstract»

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  • Modelling requirements variability across product lines

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 41 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (16)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The explicit definition of variability in software product lines is a key difference between the development of single software systems and software product line engineering. More and more companies maintain several software product lines which focus on different types of products, market segments, and/or domains. Those product lines typically share commonalities and variability. The companies thus face the problem of managing communality and variability across different product lines. In this paper, we identify essential requirements for the documentation of requirements variability across product lines. We propose a meta model for structuring the variability information, sketch a prototypical realisation for managing variability across product lines in DOORS, and illustrate the use of the meta model in a small example. We further report on experiences made with the proposed variability modelling approach. View full abstract»

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  • Exploring Web services from a business value perspective

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 53 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1088 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Emerging Web services technologies provide an open infrastructure for automated business interaction, thereby creating new opportunities for business actors to collaborate within a networked constellation of enterprises via the Internet. The basis for a viable network of Web services (the supporting information system of such a networked constellation of enterprises) is a value model that shows sound value propositions to all actors involved. Requirements engineering techniques can be developed to support: (1) exploring alternative business models, and (2) evaluating alternatives on their economic viability, leading into the design and implementation of technical systems. In this paper, we present a business-oriented approach supporting Web services idea exploration (BASSIE), which exploits the synergy between the agent- and goal-oriented i* framework and the value-based e3value framework. The approach iterates between exploration of structural alternatives and qualitative evaluation using i*, and quantitative modeling and evaluation of business value using e3value. The approach is illustrated with a real life case study in digital music distribution. View full abstract»

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  • Requirements engineering for cross-organizational ERP implementation undocumented assumptions and potential mismatches

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 63 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A key issue in requirements engineering (RE) for enterprise resource planning (ERP) in a cross-organizational context is how to find a match between the ERP application modules and requirements for business coordination. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for analyzing coordination requirements in inter-organizational ERP projects from a coordination theory perspective. It considers the undocumented assumptions for coordination that may have significant implications for ERP adopting organizations. In addition, we build a library of existing coordination mechanisms supported by modern ERP systems, and use it to make a proposal for how to improve the match between ERP implementations and supported business coordination processes. We discuss the implications of our framework for practicing requirements engineers. Our framework and library are based on a literature survey and the experience with ERP implementation of one of us (Daneva). We further validate and refine our framework. View full abstract»

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  • The role of user involvement in requirements quality and project success

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 75 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    User involvement is the key concept in the development of useful and usable systems and has positive effects on system success and user satisfaction. This paper reports the results of interviews and a survey conducted to investigate the role of user involvement in defining user requirements in development projects. The survey involved 18 software practitioners working in software related development projects in 13 companies in Finland. In addition, eight software practitioners working in three companies were interviewed. By combining qualitative and statistical analysis, we examine how users are involved in development projects and how user involvement influences projects. The analysis shows that, although it is rare in development projects, early user involvement is related to better requirements quality. The analysis also shows that involving users and customers as the source of information is related to project success. View full abstract»

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  • Persona-and-scenario based requirements engineering for software embedded in digital consumer products

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 85 - 94
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The challenge of the requirements engineering to digital consumer products lies in that the users are unknown many of wide variety. The major contributions of this article include a technique to identify persona to provide a rich contextual model of a group of primary targeted users based on conjoint analysis theory, and a technique to identify the value and hot spots in the requirements through the interaction analysis between personas and scenarios. We applied the proposed methodology to mobile phone product lines through a series of field studies conducted with more than 150 users from 2003 to 2004 in Japan. The studies revealed the various aspects of nontechnical users, and proved the effectiveness of proposed methodology in the requirements engineering for digital consumer products. View full abstract»

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  • Contextual risk analysis for interview design

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 95 - 104
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interviews with stakeholders can be a useful method for identifying user needs and establishing requirements. However, interviews are also problematic. They are time consuming and may result in insufficient, irrelevant or invalid data. Our goal is to re-examine the methodology of interview design, to determine how various contextual factors affect the success of interviews in requirements engineering. We present a case study of a Web conferencing system used by a support group for spousal caregivers of people with dementia. Two sets of interviews were conducted to identify requirements for a new version of the system. Both sets of interviews had the same information elicitation goals, but each used different interview tactics. A comparison of the participants' responses to each format offers insights into the relationship between the interview context and the relative success of each interview technique for eliciting the desired information. As a result of what we learned, we propose a framework to help analysts design interviews and chose tactics based on the context of the elicitation process. We call this the contextual risk analysis framework. View full abstract»

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  • Integrating creativity into requirements processes: experiences with an air traffic management system

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 105 - 114
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Requirements engineering is a creative process in which stakeholders and designers work together to create ideas for new systems that are eventually expressed as requirements. This paper describes RESCUE, a scenario driven requirements engineering process that includes workshops that integrate creativity techniques with different types of use case and system context modeling. It reports research in which RESCUE creativity workshops were used to discover stakeholder and system requirements for MSP, a future air traffic management system to enable the more effective, longer term planning of European airspace use. The workshops were successful in that they provided new and important outputs for subsequent requirements processes. The paper describes the workshops structures and results, and answers 3 important research questions. View full abstract»

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  • Requirements before the requirements: understanding the upstream impacts

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 117 - 124
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Being successful in product development means to deliver the right products or solutions at the right time for the right markets. While requirements engineering (RE) plays a key role in selecting and managing requirements for a given project, the "upstream process" before the project start often remains vague. Typically this upstream process is decoupled from the project related RE processes, which creates lots of project deficiencies, such as changes in requirements, and ultimately delayed release. We take the position that only by integrating upstream (e.g., roadmap) and downstream (i.e., project) processes, projects are successful. This field study is supported by data from 246 industry projects over a period of two years. We found that four described techniques must be used simultaneously in order to see tangible performance improvement. Each technique is explained by concrete and practical experiences. View full abstract»

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  • Managing requirements in a co-evolution context

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 125 - 134
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (320 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Complex artefacts, such as information systems (IS), have multiple aspects and components: business processes, databases, architecture, or software. It is generally agreed that all these should be kept consistent over time. One major issue to preserve consistency is when required evolutions affect multiple aspects or components of the system at the same time. As each evolution requirement can have an impact onto several projects, teams, engineering domains, viewpoints, or system components, the question of "is the consistency link preserved by this requirement?" has to be continuously raised. This paper presents: (i) a framework that defines challenges for RE caused by coevolution; and (ii) an approach to solve some of these RE-related coevolution challenges. The framework was developed based on our experience in three IS evolution projects: ERP installation, baselining of an IS across subsidiaries, and business process improvement driven IS evolution. Each challenge identified in the framework is discussed with respect to our experience with practice and state of the art methods. Our approach was developed for the business process improvement driven IS evolution project, then generalised for the IS baselining project. The approach is presented, and then illustrated with the case of the latter project. View full abstract»

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  • Utilizing supporting evidence to improve dynamic requirements traceability

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 135 - 144
    Cited by:  Papers (42)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (536 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Requirements traceability provides critical support throughout all phases of a software development project. However practice has repeatedly shown the difficulties involved in long term maintenance of traditional traceability matrices. Dynamic retrieval methods minimize the need for creating and maintaining explicit links and can significantly reduce the effort required to perform a manual trace. Unfortunately they suffer from recall and precision problems. This paper introduces three strategies for incorporating supporting information into a probabilistic retrieval algorithm in order to improve the performance of dynamic requirements traceability. The strategies include hierarchical modeling, logical clustering of artifacts, and semi-automated pruning of the probabilistic network. Experimental results indicate that enhancement strategies can be used effectively to improve trace retrieval results thereby increasing the practicality of utilizing dynamic trace retrieval methods. View full abstract»

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  • The role of deferred requirements in a longitudinal study of emailing

    Publication Year: 2005 , Page(s): 145 - 154
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (424 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Our group has taken a clinical approach to doing requirements engineering for a specific domain: delivering email tools to the cognitively impaired population. The clinical view suggests a process that first gathers an individual's goals, assesses the individual's abilities, delivers a tailored system, and finally, monitors usage over time to look for adaptation needs. One concept that has arisen from our project is the notion of a deferred requirement (or deferred goal). Professional clinicians ask an individual to think broadly of the goals they have, and think about not only goals that are achievable today, but ones that might be striven for and become achieved in the future. We discuss this idea of deferred requirements in terms of a longitudinal study working with nine participants over a two year period. We also report on initial attempts to build automated tools around deferred requirements, monitoring, and system adaptation. View full abstract»

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