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Web Services, 2005. ICWS 2005. Proceedings. 2005 IEEE International Conference on

Date 11-15 July 2005

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 141
  • Proceedings. 2005 IEEE International Conference on Web Service

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  • Proceedings. 2005 IEEE International Conference on Web Service

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  • Copyright page

    Page(s): iv
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): v - xvi
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  • Message from the General Chairs

    Page(s): xvii - xviii
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  • Message from the Industry Program Co-Chairs

    Page(s): xix
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  • Conference Committees

    Page(s): xx
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  • Conference Officers

    Page(s): xxi - xxii
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  • Program Committee

    Page(s): xxiii - xxiv
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  • External reviewers

    Page(s): xxv
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  • XML data services

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    Summary form only given. We address the question, "in the brave new world of Web services and service-oriented architectures (SOA), how does data fit in?" We bring data modeling concepts to bear on the world of services, yielding an approach in which enterprise data access is handled by a collection of interrelated data services. We show how the approach can be realized on a foundation of XML standards, namely XML Schema, Web services, and XQuery. We show that this approach provides a uniform and declarative framework for integrating enterprise data assets that are drawn from disparate underlying sources, including both queryable and non-queryable data sources as well as data that is encapsulated by Web services. We also show that the approach yields data services that are easily and efficiently reusable. View full abstract»

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  • Web services composition: a story of models, automata, and logics

    Page(s): xxx - xxi vol.1
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    A key research challenge in Web services concerns (semi-) automatic discovery and composition of Web services, in order to construct new Web services with desired properties or capabilities. This talk provides a survey of key developments that work towards this ambitious goal. The fundamental work in this area has centered on three models, each coming with a different approach to the composition problem. The OWL-S model for Web services focuses on how Web services interact with the "real world," represented abstractly using (time-varying) first-order logic predicates and terms. A representative composition result here uses a translation into Petri nets. The "Roman" model for services focuses on an abstract notion of "activities" (without modeling how they impact the world), and in essence model Web services as finite state automata with transitions labeled by these activities. A powerful composition result is obtained using a reduction to propositional dynamic logic (PDL). The conversation model focuses on messages passed between Web services, and again uses finite state automata to model the internal processing of a service, with transitions labeled by message sends and message reads. A key result here concerns determination of the "local" behavior of individual services, if they are required to conform to a given "global" behavior. The talk also discusses two ongoing efforts to unify the three models just described. One activity, by the semantic Web services intiative (SWSI), is to develop a semantic Web services ontology (SWSO). This is based on the Process Specification Language (PSL), a first-order ontology for sharing descriptions of manufacturing processes, which recently became an ISO standard. View full abstract»

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  • Services ecosystem

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    Summary form only given. Services businesses have become very exciting growth opportunities for the industry. How to design, model, and implement business services using IT technology is becoming a challenging issue. With the introduction of service-oriented architecture (SOA) and Web services, componentizing enterprises and services based on patterns has paved a way to running a successful services business. In this talk, the author describes the services ecosystem, methodology and supporting techniques used to build, operate, and manage business services. View full abstract»

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  • Five years of software as a service: the good, the bad and the ugly

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    Summary form only given. Software as a service (SAS) was introduced with the promise of lowering the costs associated with business software applications. To enable SAS and similar software service deployments to function smoothly, service-oriented architectures (SOAs) were introduced and have been quickly evolving for the past five years. Now, with SOAs well understood and software development environments so efficient, the return to insourcing, especially in the larger enterprises, is cutting into the earlier SAS gains. Providers for the mid-market, on the other hand, are wrestling with the dual problem - how to survive with on-demand requirements in a low margin arena? For many of the early pioneers in SAS and SOA, the past year has been one of tough demands from customers and harsh reactions from financial markets, as they continue to figure out how to survive in challenging, unchartered waters. View full abstract»

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  • Experiences with Service Computing - A view from the Business World

    Page(s): xliii - xliv
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  • Flexible and efficient matchmaking and ranking in service directories

    Page(s): 5 - 12 vol.1
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    Service directories are a key component of distributed systems where shared information must be managed efficiently. For a directory with a large numbers of entries, the result set of a query may be large, too. In this case, it is important to order the results according to heuristics and to retrieve them incrementally. Our contribution is an integrated directory system specially adapted to large-scale service discovery and composition. We introduce DirQL, a flexible query language for the matching and ranking of service descriptions. As results are incrementally retrieved, our system is able to lazily compute the result set based on: 1) the organization of the directory as a special balanced search tree that has an extra "intersection" discriminator, 2) a scheme for transforming the original query into one taking into account the tree structure of the directory, and 3) the organization of partial results in a heap structure sorted according to the transformed query. We also report on experimental results regarding the usage of the directory by a composition engine solving randomly generated problems. View full abstract»

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  • Searching service repositories by combining semantic and ontological matching

    Page(s): 13 - 20 vol.1
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    In this paper, we explore the use of domain-independent and domain-specific ontologies to find matching service descriptions. The domain-independent relationships are derived using an English thesaurus after tokenization and part-of-speech tagging. The domain-specific ontological similarity is derived by an inference on the semantic annotations associated with Web service descriptions. Matches due to the two cues are combined to determine an overall semantic similarity score. By combining multiple cues, we show that better relevancy results can be obtained for service matches from a large repository, than could be obtained using any one cue alone. View full abstract»

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  • A grammar-based index for matching business processes

    Page(s): 21 - 30 vol.1
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    Complex services are composed of simple services which typically need to be processed in a particular order. Two complex services only match if they agree on both, their simple services and their processing order. This matching semantics can be formalized by means of modelling complex services as finite state automata (FSAs), and analysing the intersection of the FSAs. However, computing the intersection of FSAs is computationally expensive, and thus, does not scale for large service repositories. This paper presents an approach for indexing and matching complex services using an abstraction that transforms the underlying FSA via its grammar into a form that can be indexed using available index mechanisms. Evaluation of this approach shows a performance gain of several orders of magnitude as compared to sequential matching. View full abstract»

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  • Batch is back: CasJobs, serving multi-TB data on the Web

    Page(s): 33 - 40 vol.1
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    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) science database describes over 230 million objects and is over 1.6 TB in size. The SDSS Catalog Archive Server (CAS) provides several levels of query interface to the SDSS data via the SkyServer website. Most queries execute in seconds or minutes. However, some queries can take hours or days, either because they require non-index scans of the largest tables, or because they request very large result sets, or because they represent very complex aggregations of the data. These "monster queries" not only take a long time, they also affect response times for everyone else - one or more of them can clog the entire system. To ameliorate this problem, we developed a multiserver multiqueue batch job submission, execution, and tracking system for the CAS called CasJobs. The transfer of very large result sets from queries over the network is another serious problem. Statistics suggested that much of this data transfer is unnecessary; users would prefer to store results locally in order to allow further joins and filtering. To allow local analysis, a system was developed that gives users their own personal databases (MyDB) at the server side. Users may transfer data to their MyDB, and then perform further analysis before extracting it to their own machine. MyDB tables also provide a convenient way to share results of queries with collaborators without downloading them. CasJobs is built using SOAP XML Web services and has been in operation since May 2004. View full abstract»

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  • Enterprise application integration using extensible Web services

    Page(s): 41 - 48 vol.1
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    This paper describes an approach to enterprise application integration (EAI) using extensible Web services. The approach is demonstrated by building a real-world application for EAI in the financial services domain. Business drivers for and approaches to EAI are presented first. The manifestation of Web services in general and their role in EAI are discussed next. Financial services domain characteristics are presented. Business drivers that entail a strong need for functional extensibility in the financial services domain are described. Our proposed architecture for EAI which addresses functional extensibility is described. This architecture is based on the notion of extensible Web services. We then present our implementation of the architecture and practical challenges encountered in EAI. A brief discussion of how our work relates to the current research in service-oriented computing (SOC) and semantic Web concludes the paper. View full abstract»

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  • A reservation-based coordination protocol for Web services

    Page(s): 49 - 56 vol.1
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    Traditional transaction semantics are not appropriate for business activities that involve long-running transactions in a loosely-coupled distributed environment, in particular, for Web services that operate between different enterprises over the Internet. In this paper we describe a novel reservation-based extended transaction protocol that can be used to coordinate such business activities. The protocol avoids the use of compensating transactions, which can result in undesirable effects. In our protocol, each task within a business activity is executed as two steps. The first step involves an explicit reservation of resources. The second step involves the confirmation or cancellation of the reservation. Each step is executed as a separate traditional short-running transaction. We show how our protocol can be implemented as a reservation protocol on top of the Web services transaction specification or, alternatively, as a coordination protocol on top of the Web services coordination specification. View full abstract»

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  • Using aspects for security engineering of Web service compositions

    Page(s): 59 - 66 vol.1
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    Web Service composition languages promise a cheap and effective means for application integration over the Internet as in typical B2B interaction scenarios. BPEL is the upcoming standard for Web Service composition and several implementations of it are already available. However, for Web Service composition languages to keep their promises it is essential to provide more support for security. Companies will embrace Web Service composition languages only if their requirements of confidentiality, integrity, authentication, etc. are fulfilled. In this paper, we look at security in Web Services compositions and present a framework for securing BPEL compositions using WS-Security and WS-Policy. The main components of our framework are the process container implemented by a set of aspects in AO4BPEL, an aspect-oriented extension to BPEL, the security service and the deployment descriptor. We also introduce the notion of policy-based process deployment to check the compatibility of the security policies of the composition and its partners at deployment time. View full abstract»

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