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Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2013
Author(s): Chan, A.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Communication, Networking & Broadcasting ;  Components, Circuits, Devices & Systems ;  Computing & Processing
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Abstract

In Networking Peripheries, Anita Chan shows how digital cultures flourish beyond Silicon Valley and other celebrated centers of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. The evolving digital cultures in the Global South vividly demonstrate that there are more ways than one to imagine what digital practice and global connection could look like. To explore these alternative developments, Chan investigates the diverse initiatives being undertaken to "network" the nation in contemporary Peru, from attempts to promote the intellectual property of indigenous artisans to the national distribution of digital education technologies to open technology activism in rural and urban zones.Drawing on ethnographic accounts from government planners, regional free-software advocates, traditional artisans, rural educators, and others, Chan demonstrates how such developments unsettle dominant conceptions of information classes and innovations zones. Government efforts to turn rural artisans into a new creative class progress alongside technology activists' efforts to promote indigenous rights through information tactics; plans pressing for the state wide adoption of open source--based technologies advance while the One Laptop Per Child initiative aims to network rural classrooms by distributing laptops. As these cases show, the digital cultures and network politics emerging on the periphery do more than replicate the technological future imagined as universal from the center.

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      Front Matter

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Title, Copyright, Dedication, Contents, Preface, Acknowledgments, Introduction: Digital Reform—Information-Age Peru View full abstract»

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      Neoliberal Networks at the Periphery

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      In Networking Peripheries, Anita Chan shows how digital cultures flourish beyond Silicon Valley and other celebrated centers of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. The evolving digital cultures in the Global South vividly demonstrate that there are more ways than one to imagine what digital practice and global connection could look like. To explore these alternative developments, Chan investigates the diverse initiatives being undertaken to "network" the nation in contemporary Peru, from attempts to promote the intellectual property of indigenous artisans to the national distribution of digital education technologies to open technology activism in rural and urban zones.Drawing on ethnographic accounts from government planners, regional free-software advocates, traditional artisans, rural educators, and others, Chan demonstrates how such developments unsettle dominant conceptions of information classes and innovations zones. Government efforts to turn rural artisans into a new creative class progress alongside technology activists' efforts to promote indigenous rights through information tactics; plans pressing for the state wide adoption of open source--based technologies advance while the One Laptop Per Child initiative aims to network rural classrooms by distributing laptops. As these cases show, the digital cultures and network politics emerging on the periphery do more than replicate the technological future imagined as universal from the center. View full abstract»

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      Enterprise Village: Intellectual Property and Rural Optimization

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Enterprising Villages, Fortune's Network, A Networked Conscience, Authored Selves View full abstract»

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      Native Stagings: Pirate Acts and the Complex of Authenticity

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Staging the Native, Exclusive Indigeneity, Export Redemption, Authenticity's Complex, On Innovation and Adulteration, Augmenting Experience, Authentic Mutations View full abstract»

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      Narrating Neoliberalism: Tales of Promiscuous Assemblage

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Civilization and the Official Story, Market Manners, Gossiping Civil Perversion View full abstract»

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      Hacking at the Periphery

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      In Networking Peripheries, Anita Chan shows how digital cultures flourish beyond Silicon Valley and other celebrated centers of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. The evolving digital cultures in the Global South vividly demonstrate that there are more ways than one to imagine what digital practice and global connection could look like. To explore these alternative developments, Chan investigates the diverse initiatives being undertaken to "network" the nation in contemporary Peru, from attempts to promote the intellectual property of indigenous artisans to the national distribution of digital education technologies to open technology activism in rural and urban zones.Drawing on ethnographic accounts from government planners, regional free-software advocates, traditional artisans, rural educators, and others, Chan demonstrates how such developments unsettle dominant conceptions of information classes and innovations zones. Government efforts to turn rural artisans into a new creative class progress alongside technology activists' efforts to promote indigenous rights through information tactics; plans pressing for the state wide adoption of open source--based technologies advance while the One Laptop Per Child initiative aims to network rural classrooms by distributing laptops. As these cases show, the digital cultures and network politics emerging on the periphery do more than replicate the technological future imagined as universal from the center. View full abstract»

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      Polyvocal Networks: Advocating Free Software in Latin America

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Speaking through Software, Network Spokesmen, Network Narrators, Letters, Legislation, and Disrupting Progress Accounts, Accounting for Local Government, Summoning Citizens, Democracy, and Code, Articulating Identities of Possibility, Repercussions: Microsoft and Other Interventions, Speaking for and through the Network View full abstract»

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      Recoding Identity: Free Software and the Local Ethics of Play

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Play and Potential, Software Choice and Ethics of the Self, The Danger of Play View full abstract»

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      Digital Interrupt: Hacking Universalism at the Network's Edge

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Peace, Love, and Technological Universalism?, Collaborative Technologies and National Technologies, “Do Nothing” or “Partner”: Preaching Global Conversion View full abstract»

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      Conclusion: Digital Author Function

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      In Networking Peripheries, Anita Chan shows how digital cultures flourish beyond Silicon Valley and other celebrated centers of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. The evolving digital cultures in the Global South vividly demonstrate that there are more ways than one to imagine what digital practice and global connection could look like. To explore these alternative developments, Chan investigates the diverse initiatives being undertaken to "network" the nation in contemporary Peru, from attempts to promote the intellectual property of indigenous artisans to the national distribution of digital education technologies to open technology activism in rural and urban zones.Drawing on ethnographic accounts from government planners, regional free-software advocates, traditional artisans, rural educators, and others, Chan demonstrates how such developments unsettle dominant conceptions of information classes and innovations zones. Government efforts to turn rural artisans into a new creative class progress alongside technology activists' efforts to promote indigenous rights through information tactics; plans pressing for the state wide adoption of open source--based technologies advance while the One Laptop Per Child initiative aims to network rural classrooms by distributing laptops. As these cases show, the digital cultures and network politics emerging on the periphery do more than replicate the technological future imagined as universal from the center. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Notes

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Chapter 1, Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Chapter 6 View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      References

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      In Networking Peripheries, Anita Chan shows how digital cultures flourish beyond Silicon Valley and other celebrated centers of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. The evolving digital cultures in the Global South vividly demonstrate that there are more ways than one to imagine what digital practice and global connection could look like. To explore these alternative developments, Chan investigates the diverse initiatives being undertaken to "network" the nation in contemporary Peru, from attempts to promote the intellectual property of indigenous artisans to the national distribution of digital education technologies to open technology activism in rural and urban zones.Drawing on ethnographic accounts from government planners, regional free-software advocates, traditional artisans, rural educators, and others, Chan demonstrates how such developments unsettle dominant conceptions of information classes and innovations zones. Government efforts to turn rural artisans into a new creative class progress alongside technology activists' efforts to promote indigenous rights through information tactics; plans pressing for the state wide adoption of open source--based technologies advance while the One Laptop Per Child initiative aims to network rural classrooms by distributing laptops. As these cases show, the digital cultures and network politics emerging on the periphery do more than replicate the technological future imagined as universal from the center. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Chan, A.
      Networking Peripheries:Technological Futures and the Myth of Digital Universalism

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      In Networking Peripheries, Anita Chan shows how digital cultures flourish beyond Silicon Valley and other celebrated centers of technological innovation and entrepreneurship. The evolving digital cultures in the Global South vividly demonstrate that there are more ways than one to imagine what digital practice and global connection could look like. To explore these alternative developments, Chan investigates the diverse initiatives being undertaken to "network" the nation in contemporary Peru, from attempts to promote the intellectual property of indigenous artisans to the national distribution of digital education technologies to open technology activism in rural and urban zones.Drawing on ethnographic accounts from government planners, regional free-software advocates, traditional artisans, rural educators, and others, Chan demonstrates how such developments unsettle dominant conceptions of information classes and innovations zones. Government efforts to turn rural artisans into a new creative class progress alongside technology activists' efforts to promote indigenous rights through information tactics; plans pressing for the state wide adoption of open source--based technologies advance while the One Laptop Per Child initiative aims to network rural classrooms by distributing laptops. As these cases show, the digital cultures and network politics emerging on the periphery do more than replicate the technological future imagined as universal from the center. View full abstract»