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Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2013
Author(s): Thompson, C.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Bioengineering ;  General Topics for Engineers (Math, Science & Engineering)
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Abstract

After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine.

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      Front Matter

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Inside Technology, Title, Copyright, Contents, Acknowledgements View full abstract»

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      Stem Cell Biopolitics

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine. View full abstract»

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      Ethical Choreography at the End of the Beginning of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The End of the Beginning, Triage: Actors, Field Sites, Transcripts, Overview of the Book View full abstract»

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      “Good Science”

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Sciences That “Have Ethics”, The Pro-Curial Frame, Its Biopolitics, and Its Necropolitics, The Ethical Choreography of Good Science View full abstract»

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      Stem Cell Geopolitics

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Stem Cell Nation, Stem Cell State

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      “These Cell Lines Should Be Useful”: Curriculum Vitae, Bush's “Fundamental Questions” versus Obama's “Responsible … Consensus”, California Dreaming (of Real Estate and Women) View full abstract»

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      Transnational Stem Cell Circuits

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Stem Cell Brain Drains, Singapore, South Korea, and the “East”, Stem Cell Internationalism versus Stem Cell Tourism View full abstract»

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      Thinking of Other Lives

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      A Forward-Looking State: On Public Donations and Reciprocity in California's Stem Cell Proposition

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Two Public Gifts and Their Taking, Reciprocity Worth Fighting For?, Four Models and Their Provocations View full abstract»

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      On the Research Subject and the Animal Model

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Substitutive Research Subject, Animal Politics, From Humanizing the Animal Model to In-Vivo-izing the In Vitro Model View full abstract»

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      Epilogue

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Appendix A Glossary

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Appendix B Resources and Primary Documents for Stem Cell Research Involving Embryo(ID) Potential Subjects, and Selected Text

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      General resources, Primary texts, Selected texts View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Appendix C Resources and Primary Documents for Stem Cell Research Involving Human Subjects, and Selected Texts

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      General resources, Primary texts, Selected texts View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Appendix D Resources and Primary Documents for Stem Cell Research Involving Non-Human Animal Subjects, and Selected Text

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      General resources, Primary texts, Selected texts View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Notes

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3, Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Chapter 6 View full abstract»

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      References

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Thompson, C.
      Good Science:The Ethical Choreography of Stem Cell Research

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      After a decade and a half, human pluripotent stem cell research has been normalized. There may be no consensus on the status of the embryo -- only a tacit agreement to disagree -- but the debate now takes place in a context in which human stem cell research and related technologies already exist. In this book, Charis Thompson investigates the evolution of the controversy over human pluripotent stem cell research in the United States and proposes a new ethical approach for "good science." Thompson traces political, ethical, and scientific developments that came together in what she characterizes as a "procurial" framing of innovation, based on concern with procurement of pluripotent cells and cell lines, a pro-cures mandate, and a proliferation of bio-curatorial practices. Thompson describes what she calls the "ethical choreography" that allowed research to go on as the controversy continued. The intense ethical attention led to some important discoveries as scientists attempted to "invent around" ethical roadblocks. Some ethical concerns were highly legible; but others were hard to raise in the dominant procurial framing that allowed government funding for the practice of stem cell research to proceed despite controversy. Thompson broadens the debate to include such related topics as animal and human research subjecthood and altruism. Looking at fifteen years of stem cell debate and discoveries, Thompson argues that good science and good ethics are mutually reinforcing, rather than antithetical, in contemporary biomedicine. View full abstract»