An Aesthesia of Networks:Conjunctive Experience in Art and Technology

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2013
Author(s): Anna Munster
Book Type: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Communication, Networking & Broadcasting ;  Components, Circuits, Devices & Systems ;  Computing & Processing
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Abstract

Today almost every aspect of life for which data exists can be rendered as a network. Financial data, social networks, biological ecologies: all are visualized in links and nodes, lines connecting dots. A network visualization of a corporate infrastructure could look remarkably similar to that of a terrorist organization. In An Aesthesia of Networks, Anna Munster argues that this uniformity has flattened our experience of networks as active and relational processes and assemblages. She counters the "network anaesthesia" that results from this pervasive mimesis by reinserting the question of experience, or aesthesia, into networked culture and aesthetics. Rather than asking how humans experience computers and networks, Munster asks how networks experience -- what operations they perform and undergo to change and produce new forms of experience. Drawing on William James's radical empiricism, she asserts that networked experience is assembled first and foremost through relations, which make up its most immediately sensed and perceived aspect. Munster critically considers a range of contemporary artistic and cultural practices that engage with network technologies and techniques, including databases and data mining, the domination of search in online activity, and the proliferation of viral media through YouTube. These practices -- from artists who "undermine" data to musicians and VJs who use intranetworked audio and video software environments -- are concerned with the relationality at the core of today's network experience.

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      Frontmatter

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half title, Technologies of Lived Abstraction, Title, Copyright, Dedication, Contents, Series Foreword, Acknowledgments, Introduction: Prelude to the Movements of Networks View full abstract»

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      Looping

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Today almost every aspect of life for which data exists can be rendered as a network. Financial data, social networks, biological ecologies: all are visualized in links and nodes, lines connecting dots. A network visualization of a corporate infrastructure could look remarkably similar to that of a terrorist organization. In An Aesthesia of Networks, Anna Munster argues that this uniformity has flattened our experience of networks as active and relational processes and assemblages. She counters the "network anaesthesia" that results from this pervasive mimesis by reinserting the question of experience, or aesthesia, into networked culture and aesthetics. Rather than asking how humans experience computers and networks, Munster asks how networks experience -- what operations they perform and undergo to change and produce new forms of experience. Drawing on William James's radical empiricism, she asserts that networked experience is assembled first and foremost through relations, which make up its most immediately sensed and perceived aspect. Munster critically considers a range of contemporary artistic and cultural practices that engage with network technologies and techniques, including databases and data mining, the domination of search in online activity, and the proliferation of viral media through YouTube. These practices -- from artists who "undermine" data to musicians and VJs who use intranetworked audio and video software environments -- are concerned with the relationality at the core of today's network experience. View full abstract»

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      Networked Diagrammatism: From Map and Model to the Internet as Mechanogram

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Maps or diagrams?, From diagram to mechanogram, William James and the mosaic of networked experience, Diagram and dispositif, Knowledge as mosaic: James and radically distributed experience View full abstract»

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      Welcome to Google Earth: Networks, World Making, and Collective Experience

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Welcome to Google Earth: Networks, World Making, and Collective Experience, Images of the world, inscription of what?, A wired and windowless world, User, usability, utility, Will Google eat itself?, Toward an allopo(i)etics of Google Earth View full abstract»

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      Data Undermining: Data Relationality and Networked Experience

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Databases and the cognitive labor of data management, Data as relation of relations, The perceptible and imperceptibility, A selective genealogy of data mining, Relational data aesthetics after the relational networking of data, Becoming imperceptible in an age of perceptibility, Becoming imperceptible in an age of imperceptibility View full abstract»

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      Refraining

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Today almost every aspect of life for which data exists can be rendered as a network. Financial data, social networks, biological ecologies: all are visualized in links and nodes, lines connecting dots. A network visualization of a corporate infrastructure could look remarkably similar to that of a terrorist organization. In An Aesthesia of Networks, Anna Munster argues that this uniformity has flattened our experience of networks as active and relational processes and assemblages. She counters the "network anaesthesia" that results from this pervasive mimesis by reinserting the question of experience, or aesthesia, into networked culture and aesthetics. Rather than asking how humans experience computers and networks, Munster asks how networks experience -- what operations they perform and undergo to change and produce new forms of experience. Drawing on William James's radical empiricism, she asserts that networked experience is assembled first and foremost through relations, which make up its most immediately sensed and perceived aspect. Munster critically considers a range of contemporary artistic and cultural practices that engage with network technologies and techniques, including databases and data mining, the domination of search in online activity, and the proliferation of viral media through YouTube. These practices -- from artists who "undermine" data to musicians and VJs who use intranetworked audio and video software environments -- are concerned with the relationality at the core of today's network experience. View full abstract»

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      Going Viral: Contagion as Networked Affect, Networked Refrain

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Viral goes viral, Contouring networked vitality: refrain and territories in viral video, Viscosity of affect and speeds of the viral, The three Cs: control, contagion, and communicability, Communicability, sociality, vitality: toward contagion as immanent movement View full abstract»

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      Nerves of Data: Contemporary Conjunctions of Networks and Brains

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Distributed neurologies/neuro-networking, Brain terrain, From noopolitics to noopolitik and back, From noopolitics to neuropolitics, Acting up, on the “nous”, From neuropolitics to noopolitics and back again, Toward a transversal noopolitics 1: a diagrammatics of the brain-image, Toward a transversal noopolitics 2: networked media amid publics View full abstract»

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      Synthesizing

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Today almost every aspect of life for which data exists can be rendered as a network. Financial data, social networks, biological ecologies: all are visualized in links and nodes, lines connecting dots. A network visualization of a corporate infrastructure could look remarkably similar to that of a terrorist organization. In An Aesthesia of Networks, Anna Munster argues that this uniformity has flattened our experience of networks as active and relational processes and assemblages. She counters the "network anaesthesia" that results from this pervasive mimesis by reinserting the question of experience, or aesthesia, into networked culture and aesthetics. Rather than asking how humans experience computers and networks, Munster asks how networks experience -- what operations they perform and undergo to change and produce new forms of experience. Drawing on William James's radical empiricism, she asserts that networked experience is assembled first and foremost through relations, which make up its most immediately sensed and perceived aspect. Munster critically considers a range of contemporary artistic and cultural practices that engage with network technologies and techniques, including databases and data mining, the domination of search in online activity, and the proliferation of viral media through YouTube. These practices -- from artists who "undermine" data to musicians and VJs who use intranetworked audio and video software environments -- are concerned with the relationality at the core of today's network experience. View full abstract»

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      Toward Syn-aesthetics: Thinking Synthesis as Relational Mosaic in Digital Audiovisuality

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Curating syn-aesthetically, The amodality of cross-processing in digital audiovisuality, Against syn-aesthetics: the total artwork, The return of synesthesia, Synthesizers, control, and the relational, Cross-processing signal or the analog compositionality of digital synthesis View full abstract»

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      The Thingness of Networks: Invasion of Pervasiveness versus Concatenated Contraptions

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Two aesthesias for things and networks, Making things relational, Making things trackable, Ambient territories and life administration, Toward a syn-aesthesia of things and relations View full abstract»

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      Notes

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Chapter 2, Chapter 2, Chapter 3, Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Chapter 6, Chapter 7 View full abstract»

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      Bibliography

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Today almost every aspect of life for which data exists can be rendered as a network. Financial data, social networks, biological ecologies: all are visualized in links and nodes, lines connecting dots. A network visualization of a corporate infrastructure could look remarkably similar to that of a terrorist organization. In An Aesthesia of Networks, Anna Munster argues that this uniformity has flattened our experience of networks as active and relational processes and assemblages. She counters the "network anaesthesia" that results from this pervasive mimesis by reinserting the question of experience, or aesthesia, into networked culture and aesthetics. Rather than asking how humans experience computers and networks, Munster asks how networks experience -- what operations they perform and undergo to change and produce new forms of experience. Drawing on William James's radical empiricism, she asserts that networked experience is assembled first and foremost through relations, which make up its most immediately sensed and perceived aspect. Munster critically considers a range of contemporary artistic and cultural practices that engage with network technologies and techniques, including databases and data mining, the domination of search in online activity, and the proliferation of viral media through YouTube. These practices -- from artists who "undermine" data to musicians and VJs who use intranetworked audio and video software environments -- are concerned with the relationality at the core of today's network experience. View full abstract»

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      Index

      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Today almost every aspect of life for which data exists can be rendered as a network. Financial data, social networks, biological ecologies: all are visualized in links and nodes, lines connecting dots. A network visualization of a corporate infrastructure could look remarkably similar to that of a terrorist organization. In An Aesthesia of Networks, Anna Munster argues that this uniformity has flattened our experience of networks as active and relational processes and assemblages. She counters the "network anaesthesia" that results from this pervasive mimesis by reinserting the question of experience, or aesthesia, into networked culture and aesthetics. Rather than asking how humans experience computers and networks, Munster asks how networks experience -- what operations they perform and undergo to change and produce new forms of experience. Drawing on William James's radical empiricism, she asserts that networked experience is assembled first and foremost through relations, which make up its most immediately sensed and perceived aspect. Munster critically considers a range of contemporary artistic and cultural practices that engage with network technologies and techniques, including databases and data mining, the domination of search in online activity, and the proliferation of viral media through YouTube. These practices -- from artists who "undermine" data to musicians and VJs who use intranetworked audio and video software environments -- are concerned with the relationality at the core of today's network experience. View full abstract»