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Robot Futures

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2013
Author(s): Nourbakhsh, I.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Components, Circuits, Devices & Systems ;  Computing & Processing (Hardware/Software) ;  Robotics & Control Systems
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Abstract

With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about.

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      Frontmatter

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): i - xxi
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half title, Title, Copyright, Dedication, Contents, Acknowledgments, Preface View full abstract»

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      New Mediocracy

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 1 - 17
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains section titled: Furniture Nation headquarters, chairman's office, Fayetteville, Arkansas, August 2030 View full abstract»

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      Robot Smog

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 19 - 48
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Senate Subcommittee on Waste Disposal & Public Safety, Washington, D.C., April 2040, The Near Future Robot Primer, Synthesis View full abstract»

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      Dehumanizing Robots

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 49 - 63
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains section titled: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 2045 View full abstract»

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      Attention Dilution Disorder

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 65 - 83
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Washington, D.C.; San Francisco, California; Tuileries Gardens, Paris; Cheddar Gorge, U.K., September 2050, CEO of Me, Incorporated View full abstract»

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      Brainspotting

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 85 - 107
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Guessing Game, Giving Up View full abstract»

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      Which Robot Future? A Way Forward

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 109 - 120
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Glossary

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 121 - 124
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      References

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 125 - 130
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Nourbakhsh, I.
      Robot Futures

      Page(s): 131 - 133
      Copyright Year: 2013

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      With robots, we are inventing a new species that is part material and part digital. The ambition of modern robotics goes beyond copying humans, beyond the effort to make walking, talking androids that are indistinguishable from people. Future robots will have superhuman abilities in both the physical and digital realms. They will be embedded in our physical spaces, with the ability to go where we cannot, and will have minds of their own, thanks to artificial intelligence. They will be fully connected to the digital world, far better at carrying out online tasks than we are. In Robot Futures, the roboticist Illah Reza Nourbakhsh considers how we will share our world with these creatures, and how our society could change as it incorporates a race of stronger, smarter beings. Nourbakhsh imagines a future that includes adbots offering interactive custom messaging; robotic flying toys that operate by means of "gaze tracking"; robot-enabled multimodal, multicontinental telepresence; and even a way that nanorobots could allow us to assume different physical forms. Nourbakhsh follows each glimpse into the robotic future with an examination of the underlying technology and an exploration of the social consequences of the scenario. Each chapter describes a form of technological empowerment -- in some cases, empowerment run amok, with corporations and institutions amassing even more power and influence and individuals becoming unconstrained by social accountability. (Imagine the hotheaded discourse of the Internet taking physical form.) Nourbakhsh also offers a counter-vision: a robotics designed to create civic and community empowerment. His book helps us understand why that is the robot future we should try to bring about. View full abstract»