By Topic

Telecommunications Switching Principles

Cover Image Copyright Year: 1979
Author(s): Hills, M.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Communication, Networking & Broadcasting
  • Print

Abstract

Possibly the largest interconnected systems in the world are telecommunications networks for public and private use. The principles underlying the design of the transmission and terminal components in this worldwide network are well established and coherent; however those involving the design of the switching center component are not. Based on the author's many years of experience in the design of telecommunications switching systems, this book explains the basic principles of switching system design and provides a unified approach to modern computer control and digital systems as well as the much more numerous electromechanical systems that comprise most of the switching equipment in public use today. Telecommunications Switching Principles is a basic reference and text in the use and design of telecommunications switching systems. Anyone who knows basic electronics and has some idea of the internal structure of simple computer systems will be able to use the book. It provides a fundamental background on the subject and an understanding of modern developments, especially in digital systems and computer control for practicing engineers, persons involved in providing of manufacturing switching equipment, and communication systems managers. It is based on courses given at the postgraduate level and could form the basis of a final year course in telecommunication engineering, teleprocessing, or real-time computer systems for graduate and undergraduate students in electrical engineering.

  •   Click to expandTable of Contents

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Front Matter

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): i - xiii
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Title, Copyright, Dedication, Preface, Contents, Tables View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Introduction to switching systems

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 1 - 26
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Purpose of the book, Types of switching systems, Centralised switching systems, Basic switching centre model, Resource sharing, Introduction to traffic and queueing theory, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Signalling and switching techniques

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 27 - 53
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Telephone systems, Data and message switching systems, Switching elements, Space-division switches, Time-division switches, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The design of economic switching centres

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 54 - 85
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Functional subdivision, Common switch networks and their control, Control of switching systems, Availability aspects of the system organisation, Alternative organisations of switching networks, Time-shared decision making, Stored program control View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Traffic theory

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 86 - 112
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Basic equations, Queueing systems, Comparison of the various distributions, Applications of traffic theory, Multi-stage switch networks - conditional selection, Simulation techniques, Traffic measurement and traffic prediction, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Telephone network organization

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 113 - 142
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Network planning, Routing plans, Numbering plans, Register control of networks, Use of step-by-step equipment, Charging, Network management, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Practical signalling systems

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 143 - 159
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Types of Signal for Telephone Systems, Signalling techniques, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Design of switching networks

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 160 - 180
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Basic multistage networks, Use of mixing stages, Network and channel graphs, Networks with concentration, Lee's simulation technique for evaluating blocking probabilities, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Control unit design

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 181 - 204
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Role of control units, The arbiter, State transition diagram for a called control unit, Signalling between control units, Signalling techniques, Design of a control unit for two-way traffic View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Some circuit techniques

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 205 - 231
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Basic Elements, Electronic components, Realisation of arbiters, Third wire control, Junctors, Switch matrix control, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Practical examples of switching systems

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 232 - 257
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Step-by-step, Crossbar systems, Reed relay systems, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Computer controlled switching systems

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 258 - 286
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Software organisation of computer controlled centres, No. 1 ESS, Japanese D-10, Metaconta Systems, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Digital switching systems

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 287 - 295
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Time-division switches, Relative merits of digital and analogue switching, Practical application of digital telephone system - Bell No. 4 ESS, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The future - a personal opinion

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 296 - 302
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: A critique of switching system design, Design principles for switching centre design, In summary, Reference View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Optimal size of switching machine

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 303 - 305
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains section titled: References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Derivation of some basic traffic theory results

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 306 - 311
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Basic assumptions, Infinite number of sources, blocked calls lost, no queue (Erlang-B formula), Limited sources (Engset equation), Call congestion, Queueing systems, Reference View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Lower limit on number of crosspoints needed in multistage networks

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 312 - 313
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Possibly the largest interconnected systems in the world are telecommunications networks for public and private use. The principles underlying the design of the transmission and terminal components in this worldwide network are well established and coherent; however those involving the design of the switching center component are not. Based on the author's many years of experience in the design of telecommunications switching systems, this book explains the basic principles of switching system design and provides a unified approach to modern computer control and digital systems as well as the much more numerous electromechanical systems that comprise most of the switching equipment in public use today. Telecommunications Switching Principles is a basic reference and text in the use and design of telecommunications switching systems. Anyone who knows basic electronics and has some idea of the internal structure of simple computer systems will be able to use the book. It provides a fundamental background on the subject and an understanding of modern developments, especially in digital systems and computer control for practicing engineers, persons involved in providing of manufacturing switching equipment, and communication systems managers. It is based on courses given at the postgraduate level and could form the basis of a final year course in telecommunication engineering, teleprocessing, or real-time computer systems for graduate and undergraduate students in electrical engineering. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Simplified proof of Takagi optimum channel graph theorem

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 314 - 321
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains section titled: Reference View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Estimation of the traffic capacity of two-stage group selectors

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 322 - 324
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Example 1. A-stage switch with n = L, Example 2. A-stage switch with n > L, Example 3. A-stage switch with n = L and m = l, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Hills, M.
      Telecommunications Switching Principles

      Page(s): 325 - 327
      Copyright Year: 1979

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Possibly the largest interconnected systems in the world are telecommunications networks for public and private use. The principles underlying the design of the transmission and terminal components in this worldwide network are well established and coherent; however those involving the design of the switching center component are not. Based on the author's many years of experience in the design of telecommunications switching systems, this book explains the basic principles of switching system design and provides a unified approach to modern computer control and digital systems as well as the much more numerous electromechanical systems that comprise most of the switching equipment in public use today. Telecommunications Switching Principles is a basic reference and text in the use and design of telecommunications switching systems. Anyone who knows basic electronics and has some idea of the internal structure of simple computer systems will be able to use the book. It provides a fundamental background on the subject and an understanding of modern developments, especially in digital systems and computer control for practicing engineers, persons involved in providing of manufacturing switching equipment, and communication systems managers. It is based on courses given at the postgraduate level and could form the basis of a final year course in telecommunication engineering, teleprocessing, or real-time computer systems for graduate and undergraduate students in electrical engineering. View full abstract»