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Bicycling Science

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2004
Author(s): Wilson, D.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: General Topics for Engineers (Math, Science & Engineering)
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Abstract

The bicycle is almost unique among human-powered machines in that it uses human muscles in a near-optimum way. This new edition of the bible of bicycle builders and bicyclists provides just about everything you could want to know about the history of bicycles, how human beings propel them, what makes them go faster, and what keeps them from going even faster. The scientific and engineering information is of interest not only to designers and builders of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles but also to competitive cyclists, bicycle commuters, and recreational cyclists.The third edition begins with a brief history of bicycles and bicycling that demolishes many widespread myths. This edition includes information on recent experiments and achievements in human-powered transportation, including the "ultimate human- powered vehicle," in which a supine rider in a streamlined enclosure steers by looking at a television screen connected to a small camera in the nose, reaching speeds of around 80 miles per hour. It contains completely new chapters on aerodynamics, unusual human-powered machines for use on land and in water and air, human physiology, and the future of bicycling. This edition also provides updated information on rolling drag, transmission of power from rider to wheels, braking, heat management, steering and stability, power and speed, and materials. It contains many new illustrations.

  •   Click to expandTable of Contents

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      Front Matter

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): i - viii
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Title, Copyright, Contents, Preface View full abstract»

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      Human Power

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 1
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The bicycle is almost unique among human-powered machines in that it uses human muscles in a near-optimum way. This new edition of the bible of bicycle builders and bicyclists provides just about everything you could want to know about the history of bicycles, how human beings propel them, what makes them go faster, and what keeps them from going even faster. The scientific and engineering information is of interest not only to designers and builders of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles but also to competitive cyclists, bicycle commuters, and recreational cyclists.The third edition begins with a brief history of bicycles and bicycling that demolishes many widespread myths. This edition includes information on recent experiments and achievements in human-powered transportation, including the "ultimate human- powered vehicle," in which a supine rider in a streamlined enclosure steers by looking at a television screen connected to a small camera in the nose, reaching speeds of around 80 miles per hour. It contains completely new chapters on aerodynamics, unusual human-powered machines for use on land and in water and air, human physiology, and the future of bicycling. This edition also provides updated information on rolling drag, transmission of power from rider to wheels, braking, heat management, steering and stability, power and speed, and materials. It contains many new illustrations. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      A short history of bicycling

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 3 - 35
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Early history, The first bicycle, The second step: pedaling propulsion, The high-wheeler or “ordinary”, Tricycles and quadricycles, The third step: the arrival of the modern “safety” bicycle, Waxing and waning enthusiasm, All-terrain bicycles, Recumbents, Bicycle technology, Note, References, Recommended reading View full abstract»

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      Human power generation

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 37 - 108
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Measuring human power output, Describing pedaling performance quantitatively, Physiology of high-power pedaling: a primer, Energetics in pedaling, Energetics in pedaling, Pedaling forces, Effects of pedaling motion, body position, and rpm, Conclusions, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Thermal effects on power production (how bicyclists keep cool)

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 109 - 120
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Local and mean heat transfer, Heat-transfer data and deductions, Minimum air speed, Bicycling in cold and hot conditions, Physiology of body-temperature regulation, Heat-transfer comparison of swimming, running, and bicycling, Conclusions, Some speculations, References, Recommended Reading View full abstract»

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      Some Bicycle Physics

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 129
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The bicycle is almost unique among human-powered machines in that it uses human muscles in a near-optimum way. This new edition of the bible of bicycle builders and bicyclists provides just about everything you could want to know about the history of bicycles, how human beings propel them, what makes them go faster, and what keeps them from going even faster. The scientific and engineering information is of interest not only to designers and builders of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles but also to competitive cyclists, bicycle commuters, and recreational cyclists.The third edition begins with a brief history of bicycles and bicycling that demolishes many widespread myths. This edition includes information on recent experiments and achievements in human-powered transportation, including the "ultimate human- powered vehicle," in which a supine rider in a streamlined enclosure steers by looking at a television screen connected to a small camera in the nose, reaching speeds of around 80 miles per hour. It contains completely new chapters on aerodynamics, unusual human-powered machines for use on land and in water and air, human physiology, and the future of bicycling. This edition also provides updated information on rolling drag, transmission of power from rider to wheels, braking, heat management, steering and stability, power and speed, and materials. It contains many new illustrations. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Power and speed

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 123 - 171
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Air resistance, Conclusions on air resistance, Slope and rolling resistance, Steady-speed power equation, Rules of thumb, Acceleration, Measurement of on-road power, Discussion of insights regarding power and drag, Bicycles versus other vehicles, Human versus animal muscle power, Bicycling versus other human-powered locomotion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Bicycle aerodynamics

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 173 - 205
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Drag coefficient, Drag, Reducing the aerodynamic drag of bicycles, Other aerodynamic phenomena, References, Recommended reading View full abstract»

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      Rolling: tires and bearings

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 208 - 235
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Some historical notes, Rolling resistance, Bicycle wheels, Rolling resistance: theory and correlations, Examples of correlations for different conditions, Notes, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Braking

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 238 - 261
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Bicycle brakes, Power absorption of brake surfaces, Friction between tire and road, Longitudinal stability during braking, Minimum braking distances for stable vehicles, Rear-wheel-only braking, Wet-weather braking, Transmission of braking force, Other developments in bicycle braking, Rim temperatures reached during downhill braking, References View full abstract»

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      Steering and balancing

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 263 - 309
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Special characteristics affecting bicycle steering, Wheeled-vehicle configurations, Broomstick analogy, How bicycles balance, Effect of bicycle configuration on steering and balancing, Nonlinear determination of balance speed and steering torque, Stability, Shimmy, Lateral properties of tires, Feel and control: the human-factors domain, Personal closing note by Dave Wilson, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Mechanics and mechanisms: power transmission

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 311 - 352
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Transmission history, Transmission efficiency, Transmission efficiency, Other forms of positive drive, Nonpositive drives, Other transmissions, Transmission efficiencies, What is the optimum number of gear ratios?, Range of variable gears, Conclusions, Notes, References, Recommended reading View full abstract»

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      Materials and stresses

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 353 - 395
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, A brief history of bicycle materials, Strength of materia, Relevant material strength, Fatigue, Bicycle failure through low-cycle fatigue, Stress raisers, Toughness versus brittle behavior, Notch sensitivity, Testing, Setting design goals, Other material properties and criteria for choice, Example: calculation of use of aluminum alloys versus steel, Nonmetallic components, Alternative frame materials, Frame design, Estimating loads, Instrumentation for stress, Wheels, Analysis of spoked wheels, Radial load, Tangential load, Lateral load, Wheel buckling, Wheel evolution, Notes, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Human-Powered Vehicles and Machines

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 397
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The bicycle is almost unique among human-powered machines in that it uses human muscles in a near-optimum way. This new edition of the bible of bicycle builders and bicyclists provides just about everything you could want to know about the history of bicycles, how human beings propel them, what makes them go faster, and what keeps them from going even faster. The scientific and engineering information is of interest not only to designers and builders of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles but also to competitive cyclists, bicycle commuters, and recreational cyclists.The third edition begins with a brief history of bicycles and bicycling that demolishes many widespread myths. This edition includes information on recent experiments and achievements in human-powered transportation, including the "ultimate human- powered vehicle," in which a supine rider in a streamlined enclosure steers by looking at a television screen connected to a small camera in the nose, reaching speeds of around 80 miles per hour. It contains completely new chapters on aerodynamics, unusual human-powered machines for use on land and in water and air, human physiology, and the future of bicycling. This edition also provides updated information on rolling drag, transmission of power from rider to wheels, braking, heat management, steering and stability, power and speed, and materials. It contains many new illustrations. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Unusual human-powered machines

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 399 - 429
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Human-powered lawn mowers and snow removers, Snow removers, Human-powered land vehicles, Electric-assist bicycles, Human-powered water vehicles, Recreational and utility watercraft, Human-powered airplanes, Human-powered helicopters, Human-powered blimp: The White Dwarf, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Human-powered vehicles in the future

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 431 - 456
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Government regulations and incentives, Data on bicycle production and use, Future bicycle technology, All-terrain bicycles, Recumbent bicycles, Quantitative measures of recumbent-bicycle performance, Recent trends in recumbent design, Tricycles and quadricycles, Transportation systems based on human-powered vehicles, Off-vehicle power assist, References View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Appendix

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 457 - 463
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Notation, Greek symbols, Definitions and equalities, Conversion factors, Derivations, Mass and weight, Properties of dry air at normal pressures, Gear-speed conversion chart View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Timeline

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 465 - 472
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The bicycle is almost unique among human-powered machines in that it uses human muscles in a near-optimum way. This new edition of the bible of bicycle builders and bicyclists provides just about everything you could want to know about the history of bicycles, how human beings propel them, what makes them go faster, and what keeps them from going even faster. The scientific and engineering information is of interest not only to designers and builders of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles but also to competitive cyclists, bicycle commuters, and recreational cyclists.The third edition begins with a brief history of bicycles and bicycling that demolishes many widespread myths. This edition includes information on recent experiments and achievements in human-powered transportation, including the "ultimate human- powered vehicle," in which a supine rider in a streamlined enclosure steers by looking at a television screen connected to a small camera in the nose, reaching speeds of around 80 miles per hour. It contains completely new chapters on aerodynamics, unusual human-powered machines for use on land and in water and air, human physiology, and the future of bicycling. This edition also provides updated information on rolling drag, transmission of power from rider to wheels, braking, heat management, steering and stability, power and speed, and materials. It contains many new illustrations. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Wilson, D.
      Bicycling Science

      Page(s): 473 - 477
      Copyright Year: 2004

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The bicycle is almost unique among human-powered machines in that it uses human muscles in a near-optimum way. This new edition of the bible of bicycle builders and bicyclists provides just about everything you could want to know about the history of bicycles, how human beings propel them, what makes them go faster, and what keeps them from going even faster. The scientific and engineering information is of interest not only to designers and builders of bicycles and other human-powered vehicles but also to competitive cyclists, bicycle commuters, and recreational cyclists.The third edition begins with a brief history of bicycles and bicycling that demolishes many widespread myths. This edition includes information on recent experiments and achievements in human-powered transportation, including the "ultimate human- powered vehicle," in which a supine rider in a streamlined enclosure steers by looking at a television screen connected to a small camera in the nose, reaching speeds of around 80 miles per hour. It contains completely new chapters on aerodynamics, unusual human-powered machines for use on land and in water and air, human physiology, and the future of bicycling. This edition also provides updated information on rolling drag, transmission of power from rider to wheels, braking, heat management, steering and stability, power and speed, and materials. It contains many new illustrations. View full abstract»




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