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Open Access

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2012
Author(s): Peter Suber
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Engineering Profession
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Abstract

The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers.

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      Front Matter

      Peter Suber Page(s): i - xii
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, The MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series, Title, Copyright, Contents, Series Foreword, Preface View full abstract»

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      What Is Open Access?

      Peter Suber Page(s): 1 - 27
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: What Makes OA Possible?, What OA Is Not View full abstract»

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      Motivation

      Peter Suber Page(s): 29 - 48
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: OA as Solving Problems, OA as Seizing Opportunities View full abstract»

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      Varieties

      Peter Suber Page(s): 49 - 75
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Green and Gold OA, Green and Gold as Complementary, Gratis and Libre OA View full abstract»

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      Policies

      Peter Suber Page(s): 77 - 95
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: OA Policies at Funding Agencies and Universities, Digression on the Word “Mandate”, Digression on the Historical Timing of OA Policies View full abstract»

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      Scope

      Peter Suber Page(s): 97 - 123
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Preprints, Postprints, and Peer Review, Theses and Dissertations, Books, Access to What?, Access for Whom? View full abstract»

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      Copyright

      Peter Suber Page(s): 125 - 132
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Economics

      Peter Suber Page(s): 133 - 147
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Casualties

      Peter Suber Page(s): 149 - 161
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: 1. Nobody knows yet how green OA policies will affect journal subscriptions, 2. The evidence from physics is the most relevant, 3. Other fields may not behave like physics, 4. There is evidence that green OA decreases downloads from publishers' web sites, 5. Most publishers voluntarily permit green OA, 6. Green OA mandates leave standing at least four library incentives to maintain their subscriptions to tollaccess journals, 7. Some studies bear on the question of whether increased OA archiving will increase journal cancellations, 8. OA may increase submissions and subscriptions, 9. Some publishers fear that green OA will increase pressure to convert to gold OA, 10. Green OA policies are justified even if they do create risks for toll-access journals View full abstract»

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      Future

      Peter Suber Page(s): 163 - 168
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Self-Help

      Peter Suber Page(s): 169 - 174
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: How to Make Your Work Gold OA, How to Make Your Work Green OA View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Glossary

      Peter Suber Page(s): 175 - 176
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Notes

      Peter Suber Page(s): 177 - 218
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Additional Resources

      Peter Suber Page(s): 219 - 221
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Peter Suber Page(s): 223 - 242
      Copyright Year: 2012

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispensable book on the subject for researchers, librarians, administrators, funders, publishers, and policy makers. View full abstract»