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A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

Cover Image Copyright Year: 1985
Author(s): Wildes, K.; Lindgren, N.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Computing & Processing (Hardware/Software)
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Abstract

Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California.

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      Front Matter

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): i - xiii
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Copyright, Title, Contents, Foreword, Preface, Acknowledgments, Half Title View full abstract»

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      Part I: Electrical Engineering: An Emerging Profession

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): xiv - 1
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

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      Introduction The Beginnings of Electrical Engineering

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 2 - 5
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: An Act to Incorporate the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and to Grant Aid to Said Institute and to the Boston Society of Natural History, Acceptance by Massachusetts Institute of Technology View full abstract»

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      Chapter 1: The Rise of Useful Learning

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 6 - 15
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Founding of MIT, The Growth of Useful Learning, The Battle for Alternative Education, Electrical Engineering View full abstract»

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      Chapter 2: Electrical Engineering: Offspring of Physics

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 16 - 30
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Charles R. Cross, The Early EE Courses, MIT and the Invention of the Telephone, Building the Nucleus of EE, How Did Electrical Engineering Get to Be Course VI?, Alternating Current: Impulse to EE Education View full abstract»

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      Chapter 3: Growth of the Department 1902–1952

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 32 - 77
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Louis Duncan (1902–1904), Graduate Education, Harry E. Clifford (1904–1907), The Dugald Jackson Era (1907–1935), First MIT Doctorates, Jackson's Philosophy and Style, Building the Graduate Program, The “New Technology”: The Move to Cambridge, EE Curriculum Changes, The Impact of World War I, Postwar: A New Direction, Postwar Departmental Buildup, The Search for a New President, 1920–1923, Research Takes a Leap, An Assessment of the Jackson Era, The Moreland Administration (1935–1938), Harold L. Hazen (1938-1952) Tumultuous Years View full abstract»

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      Part II: Setting New Directions

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 78 - 79
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Introduction Some Who Lead

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 80 - 81
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

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      Chapter 4: Machines for Solving Problems: Vannevar Bush

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 82 - 95
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Bush's Analog Machines, The First Machine, The Second Machine, The Third Machine: The Differential Analyzer, Bush's Fourth and Last Machine, The “Radiation” Integraphs View full abstract»

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      Chapter 5: From Educational Research to Application: Harold Hazen and the Network Analyzer

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 96 - 105
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Superpower and Simulation, MIT's Network Analyzer, The Demise of the Network Analyzer as a Research Facility View full abstract»

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      Chapter 6: The Building of Communications: Edward L. Bowles

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 106 - 123
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Bowles and Bush, Bowles: Getting into Radio Engineering, Redressing the Power-vs. -Communications Imbalance, The Setting for Important New Communications Research View full abstract»

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      Chapter 7: The Industrial Cooperative Program: William H. Timbie and Course VI-A

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 124 - 137
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: William H. Timbie (1919–1947), “Gene” Boehne (1947–1960), John Francis Reintjes (1960–1969), John A. Tucker and the Expanding VI-A Program View full abstract»

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      Chapter 8: Frozen Motion: Harold Edgerton and the Stroboscope

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 138 - 153
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Tackling Tech, Patents and Products, Consulting Partnership, The War Period, Incorporation View full abstract»

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      Chapter 9: Network Analysis and Synthesis: Ernst A. Guillemin

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 154 - 159
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Network Analysis and Synthesis View full abstract»

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      Chapter 10: The High-Voltage Research Laboratory: John G. Trump

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 160 - 165
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Doctoral Thesis, Cancer Treatments View full abstract»

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      Chapter 11: The Laboratory for Insulation Research: Arthur R. von Hippel

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 166 - 177
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Initiation into the EE Department, Wartime Activities, The New Peacetime Program View full abstract»

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      Part III: The War Years

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 178 - 179
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Introduction Threshold of Major Change

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 180 - 181
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Chapter 12: Organizing for War Research

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 182 - 188
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: NDRC and OSRD View full abstract»

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      Chapter 13: The Radiation Laboratory

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 190 - 209
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Radar in the Battle of Britain, The Tizard Mission, The MIT Rad Lab Is Established, Getting U.S. Radar into Combat Use, Other EE Staff, Rad Lab Disbands, The MIT Radar School View full abstract»

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      Chapter 14: Servomechanisms: The Bridge to a New Period

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 210 - 227
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Servomechanisms Development, Wartime Servo Lab Projects, Evolution of Servo Theory, The Postwar Period: Process Control and Nuclear Reactor Instrumentation, Numerical Control of Machine Tools, Toward Computerization of Numerical Control, Computer-Aided Design Project, From Servos to ESL: Expanding Horizons, Dynamic Analysis and Control Laboratory View full abstract»

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      Chapter 15: The Origins of Whirlwind: Wartime Digital Computer Research

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 228 - 235
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Rapid Arithmetical Machine, 1937–1942 View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Part IV: The Turning Point

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 236 - 237
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Introduction A Time of Reassessment

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 238 - 241
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Chapter 16: The Research Laboratory of Electronics

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 242 - 278
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Planning and Early Years of RLE, Wiener's Early Work, Information Studies by RLE Associates, Spread-Spectrum Origins, Administrative Changes, RLE Research, 1960 to the Present View full abstract»

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      Chapter 17: From Whirlwind to SAGE

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 280 - 301
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Beginnings of Whirlwind, Scaling Up the Project, Whirlwind Seminars Postwar Funding, Computer Applications, Survey of the MIT Computer Situation, Air Defense: A New Factor, A Special-Purpose Machine View full abstract»

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      Chapter 18: Growth of the Acoustical Sciences: The Acoustics Laboratory

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 302 - 309
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Toward a New Theoretical Basis, Planning the New Acoustics Laboratory, Research Activities, 1946–1958 View full abstract»

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      Chapter 19: Innovations in Engineering Education: The Gordon Brown Era

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 310 - 325
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Launching the New Curriculum, Resurgence of Electric Power Systems Research, A New Electric Power Systems Laboratory, Toward the Idea of Centers View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Part V: Into the Computer Age

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 326 - 327
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Introduction A New Identity

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 328 - 329
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Chapter 20: The Computer and Changing Perceptions

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 330 - 333
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Computer Science at MIT View full abstract»

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      Chapter 21: The Computation Center

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 334 - 341
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Phasing Out Whirlwind, Early Programming, FORTRAN and Other Computer Languages View full abstract»

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      Chapter 22: The Evolution of Time Sharing

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 342 - 353
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Project MAC, Computer Technology and the MIT Educational Program View full abstract»

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      Chapter 23: The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science: Seeking a New Paradigm in Engineering

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 354 - 373
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Some Characteristics of Computer Science, Restructuring a Department—Inward and Outward Pressures, A New Paradigm in Electrical Engineering?, Postscript View full abstract»

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      Appendix: Chronoogy 1846–1980

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 374 - 408
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

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      Notes

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 410 - 415
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Wildes, K. ; Lindgren, N.
      A Century of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, 1882-1982

      Page(s): 416 - 423
      Copyright Year: 1985

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Electrical engineering is a protean profession. Today the field embraces many disciplines that seem far removed from its roots in the telegraph, telephone, electric lamps, motors, and generators. To a remarkable extent, this chronicle of change and growth at a single institution is a capsule history of the discipline and profession of electrical engineering as it developed worldwide. Even when MIT was not leading the way, the department was usually quick to adapt to changing needs, goals, curricula, and research programs. What has remained constant throughout is the dynamic interaction of teaching and research, flexibility of administration, the interconnections with industrial progress and national priorities.The book's text and many photographs introduce readers to the renowned teachers and researchers who are still well known in engineering circles, among them: Vannevar Bush, Harold Hazen, Edward Bowles, Gordon Brown, Harold Edgerton, Ernst Guillemin, Arthur von Hippel, and Jay Forrester.The book covers the department's major areas of activity - electrical power systems, servomechanisms, circuit theory, communications theory, radar and microwaves (developed first at the famed Radiation Laboratory during World War II), insulation and dielectrics, electronics, acoustics, and computation. This rich history of accomplishments shows moreover that years before "Computer Science" was added to the department's name such pioneering results in computation and control as Vannevar Bush's Differential Analyzer, early cybernetic devices and numerically controlled servomechanisms, the Whirlwind computer, and the evolution of time-sharing computation had already been achieved.Karl Wildes has been associated with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer S cience since the 1920s, and is now Professor Emeritus. Nilo Lindgren, an electrical engineering graduate of MIT and professional scientific and technical journalist for many years, is at present affiliated with the Electric Power Res¿¿arch Institute in Palo Alto, California. View full abstract»