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Nanotechnology:Research and Perspectives

Cover Image Copyright Year: 1992
Author(s): BC Crandall; James Lewis
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Engineered Materials, Dielectrics & Plasmas
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Abstract

Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward.

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      Front Matter

      Page(s): i - ix
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Title, Copyright, Contents, Preface View full abstract»

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      Overview and Introduction

      Page(s): 1 - 11
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Historical Perspective on Nanotechnology, Molecular Systems Engineering, Related Technologies, Perspectives, Why Now?, Nanotechnology and the Cultures of Science and Engineering, Discipline in an Interdisciplinary Field, Notes View full abstract»

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      Molecular Systems Engineering

      Page(s): 13
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward. View full abstract»

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      Atomic Imaging and Positioning

      Page(s): 15 - 36
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: How the STM Works, Imaging Surface Structure with the STM, Imaging Molecules Adsorbed to a Surface with the STM, Manipulating Molecules on a Surface, Future Directions, Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Design and Characterization of 4-Helix Bundle Proteins

      Page(s): 37 - 66
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: De Novo Design of a-Helical Proteins, Building Proteins from Degenerate Units of Secondary Structure, Strategies in the Design of a 4-Helix Bundle Protein, Characterization of a 4-Helix Bundle by NMR, Design of Metal-Binding 4-Helix Bundles, Conclusion, Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Design of Self-Assembling Molecular Systems

      Page(s): 67 - 103
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Molecular Self-Assembly, Interactions in Self-Assembly of Crystalline Materials, Design Techniques, Molecular Solids with Organometallic Components: Structure and Function Relationships, Controlling Dimensionality in the Solid State by Electrostatic Templates, Where Are We Going?, Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Molecular Engineering in Japan

      Page(s): 105 - 113
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Strategies for Molecular Systems Engineering

      Page(s): 115 - 146
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Early Molecular Systems Engineering, Molecular Manipulators, Exploratory Engineering, Implications of Nanotechnology, Paths to Nanotechnology, Conclusion, Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Related Technologies

      Page(s): 147
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward. View full abstract»

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      Molecular Electronics

      Page(s): 149 - 170
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Quantum Uncertainty in Molecular Electronic Devices, Optically Coupled NAND Gates, Proteins as Molecular Electronic Devices, Cryogenic Digital Devices, Ambient and Low-Temperature Analog Devices, Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Quantum Transistors and Integrated Circuits

      Page(s): 171 - 197
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Quantum Uncertainty in Molecular Electronic Devices, Optically Coupled NAND Gates, Proteins as Molecular Electronic Devices, Cryogenic Digital Devices, Ambient and Low-Temperature Analog Devices, Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Fundamental Physical Constraints on the Computational Process

      Page(s): 199 - 213
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: What Is a Computer?, Thermodynamic Constraints on Computation, Quantum Mechanical Constraints on Computation, Computation with Cellular Automata, Conclusions, Notes, Discussion, Postscript View full abstract»

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      Nanotechnology from a Micromachinist's Point of View

      Page(s): 215 - 240
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Scale of Micromachined Devices, Evolution of Micromachining, Engineering with Silicon, Micromachining Technology, Micromachined Pressure Sensors, Other Applications of Micromachining, Micromachining Complex Machines, Micromachining and Nanotechnology, Notes, Discussion View full abstract»

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      What Major Problems Need to Be Overcome to Design and Build Molecular Systems?

      Page(s): 241 - 248
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Notes View full abstract»

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      Perspectives

      Page(s): 249
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward. View full abstract»

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      Possible Medical Applications of Nanotechnology

      Page(s): 251 - 267
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Medical Uses of Nanotechnology, Molecular Approaches to Disease, Aging, Conclusion, Notes, Discussion, Postscript View full abstract»

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      The Future of Computation

      Page(s): 269 - 280
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: In 1982, a Gloomy Prospect, Large-Scale Computing, Speeding Up Computation, Political Problems and Social Consequences, Conclusions, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Economic Consequences of New Technologies

      Page(s): 281 - 286
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: New Technologies and Unemployment, Consumption, Advancing Technology and Flexible Skills, Politics and Regulation, Conclusions, Discussion View full abstract»

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      The Risks of Nanotechnology

      Page(s): 287 - 294
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Self-Replicating Systems, Planning for Self-Replicating Systems, Designing for Safety, Legislative Constraints, Discussion View full abstract»

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      Fears and Hopes of an Environmentalist for Nanotechnology

      Page(s): 295 - 302
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Basic Values, Making Value Choices, A World without Humans, Fears of an Environmentalist for Nanotechnology, Hopes of an Environmentalist for Nanotcchnology, References View full abstract»

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      The Weapon of Openness

      Page(s): 303 - 311
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Strength of Openness, Secrecy as an Instrument of Corruption, Secrecy Exacerbates Divisiveness: the SDI Example, The Cryptography Case: Uncoupled Open Programs, The Weapon of Openness and the Future, Notes View full abstract»

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      What Public Policy Pitfalls Can Be Avoided in the Development and Regulation of Nanotechnology?

      Page(s): 313 - 323
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward. View full abstract»

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      Machines of Inner Space

      Page(s): 325 - 346
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Top-Down Approach, The Bottom-Up Approach, Building with Molecules, Goals along the Way, Assemblers and Nanotechnology, Small Products, Big Consequences, Additional Reading View full abstract»

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      There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom

      Page(s): 347 - 363
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: How Do We Write Small?, Information on a Small Scale, Better Electron Microscopes, The Marvelous Biological System, Miniaturizing the Computer, Miniaturization by Evaporation, Problems of Lubrication, A Hundred Tiny Hands, Rearranging the Atoms, Atoms in a Small World, High School Competition, Notes View full abstract»

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      Contributors

      Page(s): 365 - 369
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Page(s): 371 - 381
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Insert

      Page(s): 382 - 389
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Advances in physics, molecular biology, and computer science are converging on the capacity to control, with molecular precision, the structure and function of matter. These twenty original contributions provide the first broad-based multidisciplinary definition and examination of the revolutionary new discipline of molecular engineering, or nanotechnology. They address both the promise as well as the economic, environmental, and cultural challenges of this emerging atomic-scale technology.Leaders in their field describe current technologies that feed into nanotechnology - atomic imaging and positioning, protein engineering, and the de novo, design and synthesis of self-assembling molecular structures. They present development strategies for coordinating recent work in chemistry, biotechnology, and scanning-probe microscopy in order to successfully design and engineer molecular systems. They also explore advances in molecular and quantum electronics as well as reversible computational systems and the fundamental physical constraints on computation. Additional chapters discuss research efforts in Japan and present the prospects of nanotechnology as seen from the perspective of a microtechnologist.The final section looks at the implications of success, including the prospects of enormous computational power and the radical consequences of molecular mechanical systems in the fields of medicine and life extension.BC Crandall is Cofounder and Vice President of Prime Arithmetics, Inc.Contributors: Robert Birge. Federico Capasso. BC Crandall. K. Eric Drexler. Gregory Fahy. Richard Feynman. John Foster. Tracy Handel. Bill Joy. Arthur Kantrowitz. Joseph Mallon. Norman Margolus. Ralph Merkle. Lester Milbrath. Gordon Tullock. Hiroyuki Sasabe. Michael Ward. View full abstract»