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Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2010
Author(s): Mitchell, W.; Borroni-Bird, C.; Burns, L.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Transportation
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Abstract

This book provides a long-overdue vision for a new automobile era. The cars we drive today follow the same underlying design principles as the Model Ts of a hundred years ago and the tail-finned sedans of fifty years ago. In the twenty-first century, cars are still made for twentieth-century purposes. They're well suited for conveying multiple passengers over long distances at high speeds, but inefficient for providing personal mobility within cities--where most of the world's people now live. In this pathbreaking book, William Mitchell and two industry experts reimagine the automobile, describing vehicles of the near future that are green, smart, connected, and fun to drive. They roll out four big ideas that will make this both feasible and timely. First, we must transform the DNA of the automobile, basing it on electric-drive and wireless communication rather than on petroleum, the internal combustion engine, and stand-alone operation. This allows vehicles to become lighter, cleaner, and "smart" enough to avoid crashes and traffic jams. Second, automobiles will be linked by a Mobility Internet that allows them to collect and share data on traffic conditions, intelligently coordinates their movements, and keeps drivers connected to their social networks. Third, automobiles must be recharged through a convenient, cost-effective infrastructure that is integrated with smart electric grids and makes increasing use of renewable energy sources. Finally, dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles must be introduced to provide optimum management of urban mobility and energy systems. The fundamental reinvention of the automobile won't be easy, but it is an urgent necessity--to make urban mobility more convenient an d sustainable, to make cities more livable, and to help bring the automobile industry out of crisis.Four Big Ideas That Could Transform the Automobileï¿¿ï¿¿ Base the underlying design principles on electric-drive and wireless communications rather than the internal combustion engine and stand-alone operationï¿¿ï¿¿ Develop the Mobility Internet for sharing traffic and travel dataï¿¿ï¿¿ Integrate electric-drive vehicles with smart electric grids that use clean, renewable energy sourcesï¿¿ï¿¿ Establish dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles

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      Front Matter

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): i - x
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half-Title, Title, Copyright, Contents, Preface View full abstract»

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      Introduction

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 1 - 7
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Need for Sustainable Personal Mobility, Four Ideas: A Summary, The Combination of Transformative Ideas, Implementation, The Road Ahead View full abstract»

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      The New DNA of the Automobile

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 8 - 35
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Evolution of the Automobile and Its DNA, Emerging Problems and Opportunities, The New DNA (Part 1): Electrification, Synergies between Electrification and Connectivity, The Emerging Personal Mobility Revolution, The Opportunity for a Design Renaissance, The Electric Skateboard Concept, Novel Ways to Get In and Out, Summary: Reinventing the Automobile View full abstract»

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      The Mobility Internet

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 36 - 51
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Networked Computing and Control, Trip Times and Congestion, Choreographing the Highway, Dedicated Smart Vehicle Lanes, Providing Warnings, Location-Based Services, Recapturing the Horse's Intelligence, Electronic Customization, Merging Life Inside and Outside the Vehicle, New Driving and Riding Experiences, Social Networking on Wheels, Summary: A Revolution in Movement and Interaction View full abstract»

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      Reinventing the Automobile for Urban Use

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 52 - 83
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Limitations of Existing Vehicle Designs for Urban Use, Potential for a New Type of 100-Inch, 1,000-Pound Vehicle: The USV, The Simplicity of Battery-Electric Vehicles, Wheel Motors, Robot Wheels, Emerging Vehicle Concepts, The MIT Media Laboratory's CityCar, Project P.U.M.A. (Personal Urban Mobility and Accessibility, Affordability, Summary: USVs Designed for Cities, Not Cities Designed around Cars View full abstract»

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      Clean, Smart Energy Supply

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 84 - 95
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Disadvantages of Gasoline, New Energy Supply Chains for Automobiles, The Complementary Nature of Electricity and Hydrogen, The Advantages of Electrification, The Effects of Energy Density, The Opportunity of Evolving Battery Technology, Summary: Battery-Electric Automobiles Can Effectively Meet the Needs of Today's Urban Drivers View full abstract»

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      Charging Infrastructure

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 96 - 113
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Design Requirements for a Charging Infrastructure, Charging Infrastructure and the Grid, Slow versus Fast Charging, Contact versus Inductive Charging, The Implications of Improving Battery Technology, Electrification of Parking Garages, Smart Streets, Smart Curbs, Potential Electrification of Roadways, Incremental Deployment of Charging Infrastructure, Summary: There Are No Insurmountable Barriers to Providing an Effective Charging Infrastructure View full abstract»

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      Integrating Vehicles and Smart Electric Grids

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 114 - 129
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Load-Leveling Strategies, Making More Efficient Use of Fossil Fuels, Effectively Integrating Renewables, Distributed Urban Energy Systems, Dynamic Electricity Pricing, The Parallel Emergence of Electric-Drive Vehicles and Smart Grids, Summary: Smart Sustainability View full abstract»

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      New Mobility Markets

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 130 - 155
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Smoothing Peaks in Road and Parking Space Demand, Extending the Principle of Congestion Pricing, Integrating Road Pricing, Navigation, and Optimization, Extending the Principle of Dynamic Pricing to Parking, Enabling Mobility-on-Demand Systems, Automating Pickup and Drop-Off Transactions, Creating and Managing One-Way, Distributed Rental Systems, Where Mobility-on-Demand Systems Make the Most Sense, Managing Vehicle and Parking Space Stocks, Using Dynamic Pricing for Balancing, Combined Pricing, Integrating Search and Advertising, Summary: Automobiles as Interfaces to the City View full abstract»

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      Personal Mobility in an Urbanizing World

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 156 - 186
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Vehicle Ownership, Personal Wealth, and Population Density, Urban Trips Are Short, Urban Driving Speeds Are Low, Traffic Congestion Diminishes Throughput and Energy Efficiency, Parking Competes with Other Uses of Urban Space, Automobile Use Has Negative Externalities, Cities Are Limiting Automobile Use, Safety Improvements with USVs, Energy Efficiency Goals Achievable through USVs, Throughput Improvements, Parking Space Reductions, Overall Effects on Urban Space and Civic Amenity, Summary: Livable, Sustainable Cities View full abstract»

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      Realizing the Vision

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 188 - 198
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Lessons of the Internet, The Challenge of Large-Scale Codependencies, Working a Wicked Problem, Summary: The Essential Steps View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Notes

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 200 - 202
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides a long-overdue vision for a new automobile era. The cars we drive today follow the same underlying design principles as the Model Ts of a hundred years ago and the tail-finned sedans of fifty years ago. In the twenty-first century, cars are still made for twentieth-century purposes. They're well suited for conveying multiple passengers over long distances at high speeds, but inefficient for providing personal mobility within cities--where most of the world's people now live. In this pathbreaking book, William Mitchell and two industry experts reimagine the automobile, describing vehicles of the near future that are green, smart, connected, and fun to drive. They roll out four big ideas that will make this both feasible and timely. First, we must transform the DNA of the automobile, basing it on electric-drive and wireless communication rather than on petroleum, the internal combustion engine, and stand-alone operation. This allows vehicles to become lighter, cleaner, and "smart" enough to avoid crashes and traffic jams. Second, automobiles will be linked by a Mobility Internet that allows them to collect and share data on traffic conditions, intelligently coordinates their movements, and keeps drivers connected to their social networks. Third, automobiles must be recharged through a convenient, cost-effective infrastructure that is integrated with smart electric grids and makes increasing use of renewable energy sources. Finally, dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles must be introduced to provide optimum management of urban mobility and energy systems. The fundamental reinvention of the automobile won't be easy, but it is an urgent necessity--to make urban mobility more convenient an d sustainable, to make cities more livable, and to help bring the automobile industry out of crisis.Four Big Ideas That Could Transform the Automobileï¿¿ï¿¿ Base the underlying design principles on electric-drive and wireless communications rather than the internal combustion engine and stand-alone operationï¿¿ï¿¿ Develop the Mobility Internet for sharing traffic and travel dataï¿¿ï¿¿ Integrate electric-drive vehicles with smart electric grids that use clean, renewable energy sourcesï¿¿ï¿¿ Establish dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Acknowledgments

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 204 - 207
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides a long-overdue vision for a new automobile era. The cars we drive today follow the same underlying design principles as the Model Ts of a hundred years ago and the tail-finned sedans of fifty years ago. In the twenty-first century, cars are still made for twentieth-century purposes. They're well suited for conveying multiple passengers over long distances at high speeds, but inefficient for providing personal mobility within cities--where most of the world's people now live. In this pathbreaking book, William Mitchell and two industry experts reimagine the automobile, describing vehicles of the near future that are green, smart, connected, and fun to drive. They roll out four big ideas that will make this both feasible and timely. First, we must transform the DNA of the automobile, basing it on electric-drive and wireless communication rather than on petroleum, the internal combustion engine, and stand-alone operation. This allows vehicles to become lighter, cleaner, and "smart" enough to avoid crashes and traffic jams. Second, automobiles will be linked by a Mobility Internet that allows them to collect and share data on traffic conditions, intelligently coordinates their movements, and keeps drivers connected to their social networks. Third, automobiles must be recharged through a convenient, cost-effective infrastructure that is integrated with smart electric grids and makes increasing use of renewable energy sources. Finally, dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles must be introduced to provide optimum management of urban mobility and energy systems. The fundamental reinvention of the automobile won't be easy, but it is an urgent necessity--to make urban mobility more convenient an d sustainable, to make cities more livable, and to help bring the automobile industry out of crisis.Four Big Ideas That Could Transform the Automobileï¿¿ï¿¿ Base the underlying design principles on electric-drive and wireless communications rather than the internal combustion engine and stand-alone operationï¿¿ï¿¿ Develop the Mobility Internet for sharing traffic and travel dataï¿¿ï¿¿ Integrate electric-drive vehicles with smart electric grids that use clean, renewable energy sourcesï¿¿ï¿¿ Establish dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Bibliography

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 208 - 213
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides a long-overdue vision for a new automobile era. The cars we drive today follow the same underlying design principles as the Model Ts of a hundred years ago and the tail-finned sedans of fifty years ago. In the twenty-first century, cars are still made for twentieth-century purposes. They're well suited for conveying multiple passengers over long distances at high speeds, but inefficient for providing personal mobility within cities--where most of the world's people now live. In this pathbreaking book, William Mitchell and two industry experts reimagine the automobile, describing vehicles of the near future that are green, smart, connected, and fun to drive. They roll out four big ideas that will make this both feasible and timely. First, we must transform the DNA of the automobile, basing it on electric-drive and wireless communication rather than on petroleum, the internal combustion engine, and stand-alone operation. This allows vehicles to become lighter, cleaner, and "smart" enough to avoid crashes and traffic jams. Second, automobiles will be linked by a Mobility Internet that allows them to collect and share data on traffic conditions, intelligently coordinates their movements, and keeps drivers connected to their social networks. Third, automobiles must be recharged through a convenient, cost-effective infrastructure that is integrated with smart electric grids and makes increasing use of renewable energy sources. Finally, dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles must be introduced to provide optimum management of urban mobility and energy systems. The fundamental reinvention of the automobile won't be easy, but it is an urgent necessity--to make urban mobility more convenient an d sustainable, to make cities more livable, and to help bring the automobile industry out of crisis.Four Big Ideas That Could Transform the Automobileï¿¿ï¿¿ Base the underlying design principles on electric-drive and wireless communications rather than the internal combustion engine and stand-alone operationï¿¿ï¿¿ Develop the Mobility Internet for sharing traffic and travel dataï¿¿ï¿¿ Integrate electric-drive vehicles with smart electric grids that use clean, renewable energy sourcesï¿¿ï¿¿ Establish dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Illustration Sources

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 214 - 216
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides a long-overdue vision for a new automobile era. The cars we drive today follow the same underlying design principles as the Model Ts of a hundred years ago and the tail-finned sedans of fifty years ago. In the twenty-first century, cars are still made for twentieth-century purposes. They're well suited for conveying multiple passengers over long distances at high speeds, but inefficient for providing personal mobility within cities--where most of the world's people now live. In this pathbreaking book, William Mitchell and two industry experts reimagine the automobile, describing vehicles of the near future that are green, smart, connected, and fun to drive. They roll out four big ideas that will make this both feasible and timely. First, we must transform the DNA of the automobile, basing it on electric-drive and wireless communication rather than on petroleum, the internal combustion engine, and stand-alone operation. This allows vehicles to become lighter, cleaner, and "smart" enough to avoid crashes and traffic jams. Second, automobiles will be linked by a Mobility Internet that allows them to collect and share data on traffic conditions, intelligently coordinates their movements, and keeps drivers connected to their social networks. Third, automobiles must be recharged through a convenient, cost-effective infrastructure that is integrated with smart electric grids and makes increasing use of renewable energy sources. Finally, dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles must be introduced to provide optimum management of urban mobility and energy systems. The fundamental reinvention of the automobile won't be easy, but it is an urgent necessity--to make urban mobility more convenient an d sustainable, to make cities more livable, and to help bring the automobile industry out of crisis.Four Big Ideas That Could Transform the Automobileï¿¿ï¿¿ Base the underlying design principles on electric-drive and wireless communications rather than the internal combustion engine and stand-alone operationï¿¿ï¿¿ Develop the Mobility Internet for sharing traffic and travel dataï¿¿ï¿¿ Integrate electric-drive vehicles with smart electric grids that use clean, renewable energy sourcesï¿¿ï¿¿ Establish dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Mitchell, W. ; Borroni-Bird, C. ; Burns, L.
      Reinventing the Automobile:Personal Urban Mobility for the 21st Century

      Page(s): 218 - 227
      Copyright Year: 2010

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides a long-overdue vision for a new automobile era. The cars we drive today follow the same underlying design principles as the Model Ts of a hundred years ago and the tail-finned sedans of fifty years ago. In the twenty-first century, cars are still made for twentieth-century purposes. They're well suited for conveying multiple passengers over long distances at high speeds, but inefficient for providing personal mobility within cities--where most of the world's people now live. In this pathbreaking book, William Mitchell and two industry experts reimagine the automobile, describing vehicles of the near future that are green, smart, connected, and fun to drive. They roll out four big ideas that will make this both feasible and timely. First, we must transform the DNA of the automobile, basing it on electric-drive and wireless communication rather than on petroleum, the internal combustion engine, and stand-alone operation. This allows vehicles to become lighter, cleaner, and "smart" enough to avoid crashes and traffic jams. Second, automobiles will be linked by a Mobility Internet that allows them to collect and share data on traffic conditions, intelligently coordinates their movements, and keeps drivers connected to their social networks. Third, automobiles must be recharged through a convenient, cost-effective infrastructure that is integrated with smart electric grids and makes increasing use of renewable energy sources. Finally, dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles must be introduced to provide optimum management of urban mobility and energy systems. The fundamental reinvention of the automobile won't be easy, but it is an urgent necessity--to make urban mobility more convenient an d sustainable, to make cities more livable, and to help bring the automobile industry out of crisis.Four Big Ideas That Could Transform the Automobileï¿¿ï¿¿ Base the underlying design principles on electric-drive and wireless communications rather than the internal combustion engine and stand-alone operationï¿¿ï¿¿ Develop the Mobility Internet for sharing traffic and travel dataï¿¿ï¿¿ Integrate electric-drive vehicles with smart electric grids that use clean, renewable energy sourcesï¿¿ï¿¿ Establish dynamically priced markets for electricity, road space, parking space, and shared-use vehicles View full abstract»