Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

The Inner History of Devices

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2008
Author(s): Turkle, S.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Components, Circuits, Devices & Systems
  • Print

Abstract

For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough.

  •   Click to expandTable of Contents

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Front Matter

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): i - x
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Title, Copyright, Dedication, Contents, Acknowledgments View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Reading the Inner History of Devices

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 1
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Inner History

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 2 - 29
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Three Ways of Listening, The Prepared Listener, Untold Stories, Collection and Recollection View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Through Memoir

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 31
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The Prosthetic Eye

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 32 - 40
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Through a Child's Eye, The Prosthetic Aesthetic, The Story Nobody Will Tell You View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Cell Phones

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 41 - 48
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The Patterning Table

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 49 - 54
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Television

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 55 - 61
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Parents and Children, Scriptwriting View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Through Clinical Practice

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 63
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The World Wide Web

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 64 - 76
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Role Playing, Blogging, Being the Main Character View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Computer Games

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 77 - 85
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Joanie, Billy and Lawrence View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Cyberplaces

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 86 - 95
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Chats and Games, Emails and the Analytic Couple, Psychoanalytic Subjectivities View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Through Fieldwork

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 97
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The Internal Cardiac Defibrillator

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 98 - 110
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Death and Life, Before and After, Cyborgs View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The Visible Human

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 112 - 124
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Wendell, Cybil, Julie View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Slashdot.Org

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 125 - 137
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Learning Addicts, Working Addicts, Dissenting Addicts, Danger and Addiction, Defending Addiction View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The Dialysis Machine

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 138 - 152
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Zehra, Oguz, The Influencing Machine View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Video Poker

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 153 - 171
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Self as an Enterprise, Self-Liquidation, Money and Time, Machine Life, Postscript View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Notes

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 172 - 197
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Turkle, S.
      The Inner History of Devices

      Page(s): 198 - 208
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      For more than two decades, in such landmark studies as The Second Self and Life on the Screen, Sherry Turkle has challenged our collective imagination with her insights about how technology enters our private worlds. In The Inner History of Devices, she describes her process, an approach that reveals how what we make is woven into our ways of seeing ourselves. She brings together three traditions of listening--that of the memoirist, the clinician, and the ethnographer. Each informs the others to compose an inner history of devices. We read about objects ranging from cell phones and video poker to prosthetic eyes, from Web sites and television to dialysis machines. In an introductory essay, Turkle makes the case for an "intimate ethnography" that challenges conventional wisdom. One personal computer owner tells Turkle: "This computer means everything to me. It's where I put my hope." Turkle explains that she began that conversation thinking she would learn how people put computers to work. By its end, her question has changed: "What was there about personal computers that offered such deep connection? What did a computer have that offered hope?" The Inner History of Devices teaches us to listen for the answer. In the memoirs, ethnographies, and clinical cases collected in this volume, we read about an American student who comes to terms with her conflicting identities as she contemplates a cell phone she used in Japan ("Tokyo sat trapped inside it"); a troubled patient who uses email both to criticize her therapist and to be reassured by her; a compulsive gambler who does not want to win steadily at video poker because a pattern of losing and winning keeps her more connected to the body of the machine. In these writings, we hear untold stories. We learn that received wisdom never goes far enough. View full abstract»




| Create Account

IEEE Account

Purchase Details

Profile Information

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.