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Morphology and Computation

Cover Image Copyright Year: 1992
Author(s): Richard Sproat
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Engineering Profession
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Abstract

This book provides the first broad yet thorough coverage of issues in morphological theory. It includes a wide array of techniques and systems in computational morphology (including discussion of their limitations), and describes some unusual applications.Sproat motivates the study of computational morphology by arguing that a computational natural language system, such as a parser or a generator, must incorporate a model of morphology. He discusses a range of applications for programs with knowledge of morphology, some of which are not generally found in the literature. Sproat then provides an overview of some of the basic descriptive facts about morphology and issues in theoretical morphology and (lexical) phonology, as well as psycholinguistic evidence for human processing of morphological structure. He take up the basic techniques that have been proposed for doing morphological processing and discusses at length various systems (such as DECOMP and KIMMO) that incorporate part or all of those techniques, pointing out the inadequacies of such systems from both a descriptive and a computational point of view. He concludes by touching on interesting peripheral areas such as the analysis of complex nominals in English, and on the main contributions of Rumelhart and McClelland's connectionism to the computational analysis of words.Richard Sproat is Member of the Technical Staff at the AT&T Bell Laboratories.

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      Front Matter

      Page(s): i - xv
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, ACL-MIT Press Series in Natural Language Processing, Title, Copyright, Contents, Preface, Introduction View full abstract»

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      Applications of Computational Morphology

      Page(s): 1 - 14
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Natural Language Applications, Speech Applications, Word Processing, Document Retrieval, Conclusions View full abstract»

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      The Nature of Morphology

      Page(s): 15 - 123
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Functions of Morphology, What is Combined, and How?, MORPHEMES, The Structure of Words, and Word-Formation Rules, Morphotactics: The Order of Morphemes, Phonology, Orthography Versus Phonology, Psycholinguistic Evidence, Final Note, Further Reading View full abstract»

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      Computational Morphology

      Page(s): 124 - 214
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Computational Mechanisms, An Overview of Urkimmo, Augments to The Kimmo Approach, The Computational Complexity of Two-Level Morphology, Other Ways of Doing Computational Morphology, A Prospectus: What Is Left To Do, Further Reading View full abstract»

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      Some Peripheral Issues

      Page(s): 215 - 240
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Morphological Acquisition, Compound Nominals and Related Constructions View full abstract»

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      Key to Abbreviations

      Page(s): 241 - 242
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides the first broad yet thorough coverage of issues in morphological theory. It includes a wide array of techniques and systems in computational morphology (including discussion of their limitations), and describes some unusual applications.Sproat motivates the study of computational morphology by arguing that a computational natural language system, such as a parser or a generator, must incorporate a model of morphology. He discusses a range of applications for programs with knowledge of morphology, some of which are not generally found in the literature. Sproat then provides an overview of some of the basic descriptive facts about morphology and issues in theoretical morphology and (lexical) phonology, as well as psycholinguistic evidence for human processing of morphological structure. He take up the basic techniques that have been proposed for doing morphological processing and discusses at length various systems (such as DECOMP and KIMMO) that incorporate part or all of those techniques, pointing out the inadequacies of such systems from both a descriptive and a computational point of view. He concludes by touching on interesting peripheral areas such as the analysis of complex nominals in English, and on the main contributions of Rumelhart and McClelland's connectionism to the computational analysis of words.Richard Sproat is Member of the Technical Staff at the AT&T Bell Laboratories. View full abstract»

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      Glossary

      Page(s): 243 - 251
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides the first broad yet thorough coverage of issues in morphological theory. It includes a wide array of techniques and systems in computational morphology (including discussion of their limitations), and describes some unusual applications.Sproat motivates the study of computational morphology by arguing that a computational natural language system, such as a parser or a generator, must incorporate a model of morphology. He discusses a range of applications for programs with knowledge of morphology, some of which are not generally found in the literature. Sproat then provides an overview of some of the basic descriptive facts about morphology and issues in theoretical morphology and (lexical) phonology, as well as psycholinguistic evidence for human processing of morphological structure. He take up the basic techniques that have been proposed for doing morphological processing and discusses at length various systems (such as DECOMP and KIMMO) that incorporate part or all of those techniques, pointing out the inadequacies of such systems from both a descriptive and a computational point of view. He concludes by touching on interesting peripheral areas such as the analysis of complex nominals in English, and on the main contributions of Rumelhart and McClelland's connectionism to the computational analysis of words.Richard Sproat is Member of the Technical Staff at the AT&T Bell Laboratories. View full abstract»

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      Notes

      Page(s): 253 - 268
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides the first broad yet thorough coverage of issues in morphological theory. It includes a wide array of techniques and systems in computational morphology (including discussion of their limitations), and describes some unusual applications.Sproat motivates the study of computational morphology by arguing that a computational natural language system, such as a parser or a generator, must incorporate a model of morphology. He discusses a range of applications for programs with knowledge of morphology, some of which are not generally found in the literature. Sproat then provides an overview of some of the basic descriptive facts about morphology and issues in theoretical morphology and (lexical) phonology, as well as psycholinguistic evidence for human processing of morphological structure. He take up the basic techniques that have been proposed for doing morphological processing and discusses at length various systems (such as DECOMP and KIMMO) that incorporate part or all of those techniques, pointing out the inadequacies of such systems from both a descriptive and a computational point of view. He concludes by touching on interesting peripheral areas such as the analysis of complex nominals in English, and on the main contributions of Rumelhart and McClelland's connectionism to the computational analysis of words.Richard Sproat is Member of the Technical Staff at the AT&T Bell Laboratories. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      References

      Page(s): 269 - 285
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides the first broad yet thorough coverage of issues in morphological theory. It includes a wide array of techniques and systems in computational morphology (including discussion of their limitations), and describes some unusual applications.Sproat motivates the study of computational morphology by arguing that a computational natural language system, such as a parser or a generator, must incorporate a model of morphology. He discusses a range of applications for programs with knowledge of morphology, some of which are not generally found in the literature. Sproat then provides an overview of some of the basic descriptive facts about morphology and issues in theoretical morphology and (lexical) phonology, as well as psycholinguistic evidence for human processing of morphological structure. He take up the basic techniques that have been proposed for doing morphological processing and discusses at length various systems (such as DECOMP and KIMMO) that incorporate part or all of those techniques, pointing out the inadequacies of such systems from both a descriptive and a computational point of view. He concludes by touching on interesting peripheral areas such as the analysis of complex nominals in English, and on the main contributions of Rumelhart and McClelland's connectionism to the computational analysis of words.Richard Sproat is Member of the Technical Staff at the AT&T Bell Laboratories. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Page(s): 287 - 295
      Copyright Year: 1992

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This book provides the first broad yet thorough coverage of issues in morphological theory. It includes a wide array of techniques and systems in computational morphology (including discussion of their limitations), and describes some unusual applications.Sproat motivates the study of computational morphology by arguing that a computational natural language system, such as a parser or a generator, must incorporate a model of morphology. He discusses a range of applications for programs with knowledge of morphology, some of which are not generally found in the literature. Sproat then provides an overview of some of the basic descriptive facts about morphology and issues in theoretical morphology and (lexical) phonology, as well as psycholinguistic evidence for human processing of morphological structure. He take up the basic techniques that have been proposed for doing morphological processing and discusses at length various systems (such as DECOMP and KIMMO) that incorporate part or all of those techniques, pointing out the inadequacies of such systems from both a descriptive and a computational point of view. He concludes by touching on interesting peripheral areas such as the analysis of complex nominals in English, and on the main contributions of Rumelhart and McClelland's connectionism to the computational analysis of words.Richard Sproat is Member of the Technical Staff at the AT&T Bell Laboratories. View full abstract»