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Governing Global Electronic Networks:International Perspectives on Policy and Power

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2008
Author(s): William J. Drake; Ernest J. Wilson
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Engineering Profession
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Abstract

The burgeoning use and transformative impact of global electronic networks are widely recognized to be defining features of contemporary world affairs. Less often noted has been the increasing importance of global governance arrangements in managing the many issues raised in such networks. This volume helps fill the gap by assessing some of the key international institutions pertaining to global telecommunications regulation and standardization, radio frequency spectrum, satellite systems, trade in services, electronic commerce, intellectual property, traditional mass media and Internet content, Internet names and numbers, cybercrime, privacy protection, and development. Eschewing technocratic approaches, the contributors offer empirically rich studies of the international power dynamics shaping these institutions. They devote particular attention to the roles and concerns of nondominant stakeholders, such as developing countries and civil society, and find that global governance often reinforces wider power disparities between and within nation-states. But at the same time, the contributors note, governance arrangements often provide nondominant stakeholders with the policy space needed to advance their interests more effectively. Each chapter concludes with a set of policy recommendations for the promotion of an open, dynamic, and more equitable networld order.ContributorsPeng Hwa Ang, Jonathan D. Aronson, Byung-il Choi, Tracy Cohen, Peter F. Cowhey, William J. Drake, Henry Farrell, Rob Frieden, Alison Gillwald, Boutheina Guermazi, Cees J. Hamelink, Ian Hosein, Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, Don MacLean, Christopher May, Milton Mueller, John Richards, David Souter, Ernest Wilson III, Jisuk Woo.

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      Front Matter

      Page(s): i - xvi
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, The Information Revolution and Global Politics, Title, Copyright, Contents, Preface, Acknowledgments View full abstract»

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      Introduction: The Distributed Architecture of Network Global Governance

      Page(s): 1 - 79
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Nature of ICT Global Governance, Historical Evolution, The Global Governance of Infrastructure, The Global Governance of Networked Information, Communication, and Commerce, References View full abstract»

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      The Global Governance of Infrastructure

      Page(s): 81
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The burgeoning use and transformative impact of global electronic networks are widely recognized to be defining features of contemporary world affairs. Less often noted has been the increasing importance of global governance arrangements in managing the many issues raised in such networks. This volume helps fill the gap by assessing some of the key international institutions pertaining to global telecommunications regulation and standardization, radio frequency spectrum, satellite systems, trade in services, electronic commerce, intellectual property, traditional mass media and Internet content, Internet names and numbers, cybercrime, privacy protection, and development. Eschewing technocratic approaches, the contributors offer empirically rich studies of the international power dynamics shaping these institutions. They devote particular attention to the roles and concerns of nondominant stakeholders, such as developing countries and civil society, and find that global governance often reinforces wider power disparities between and within nation-states. But at the same time, the contributors note, governance arrangements often provide nondominant stakeholders with the policy space needed to advance their interests more effectively. Each chapter concludes with a set of policy recommendations for the promotion of an open, dynamic, and more equitable networld order.ContributorsPeng Hwa Ang, Jonathan D. Aronson, Byung-il Choi, Tracy Cohen, Peter F. Cowhey, William J. Drake, Henry Farrell, Rob Frieden, Alison Gillwald, Boutheina Guermazi, Cees J. Hamelink, Ian Hosein, Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, Don MacLean, Christopher May, Milton Mueller, John Richards, David Souter, Ernest Wilson III, Jisuk Woo. View full abstract»

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      Sovereign Right and the Dynamics of Power in the ITU: Lessons in the Quest for Inclusive Global Governance

      Page(s): 83 - 126
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Past as Prologue: The ITU and the Quest for Global Governance, Fit for the Future?, The ITU Reform Movement: Fifteen Years of Frustration, Lessons Learned: What Works and What Doesn't, Recommendations, Conclusion, Appendix, Transforming the ITU into a Global Telecommunications Organization, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Balancing Equity and Efficiency Issues in Global Spectrum Management

      Page(s): 127 - 148
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Longstanding Issues, Current Issues, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Peculiar Evolution of 3G Wireless Networks: Institutional Logic, Politics, and Property Rights

      Page(s): 149 - 186
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Policy Reform and the Dynamics of Balancing Stakeholder Interests, Defining Global Policies for Wireless Markets, What Next?, Conclusion, Notes, Bibliography View full abstract»

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      The GATS Agreement on Basic Telecommunications: A Developing Country Perspective

      Page(s): 187 - 230
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Global Governance of Trade in Telecommunications Services, Power Dynamics in Agenda Setting, Negotiations, and Outcomes, Importance and Impact of Wider Market and Corporate Dynamics, Using the GATS's Empowerment Possibilities, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Global Governance of Networked Information, Communication, and Commerce

      Page(s): 231
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The burgeoning use and transformative impact of global electronic networks are widely recognized to be defining features of contemporary world affairs. Less often noted has been the increasing importance of global governance arrangements in managing the many issues raised in such networks. This volume helps fill the gap by assessing some of the key international institutions pertaining to global telecommunications regulation and standardization, radio frequency spectrum, satellite systems, trade in services, electronic commerce, intellectual property, traditional mass media and Internet content, Internet names and numbers, cybercrime, privacy protection, and development. Eschewing technocratic approaches, the contributors offer empirically rich studies of the international power dynamics shaping these institutions. They devote particular attention to the roles and concerns of nondominant stakeholders, such as developing countries and civil society, and find that global governance often reinforces wider power disparities between and within nation-states. But at the same time, the contributors note, governance arrangements often provide nondominant stakeholders with the policy space needed to advance their interests more effectively. Each chapter concludes with a set of policy recommendations for the promotion of an open, dynamic, and more equitable networld order.ContributorsPeng Hwa Ang, Jonathan D. Aronson, Byung-il Choi, Tracy Cohen, Peter F. Cowhey, William J. Drake, Henry Farrell, Rob Frieden, Alison Gillwald, Boutheina Guermazi, Cees J. Hamelink, Ian Hosein, Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, Don MacLean, Christopher May, Milton Mueller, John Richards, David Souter, Ernest Wilson III, Jisuk Woo. View full abstract»

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      Trade Barriers or Cultural Diversity? The Audiovisual Sector on Fire

      Page(s): 233 - 273
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: What Is at Stake?, Blowing Trade Wind in the Cultural Sector, International Governance of Trade in Culture, David against Goliath: The Film Industries of Canada, Mexico, and Korea versus the United States13, The New Battle: The WTO Doha Round versus the UNESCO Cultural Convention, Sneak Preview of the Future: Coming to a Theater near You, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Global Governance of Mass Media Content

      Page(s): 275 - 303
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Freedom versus Interference: The “Responsible Speech” Argument, Freedom versus Interference: the “National Sovereignty” Argument, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      International Regulation of Internet Content: Possibilities and Limits

      Page(s): 305 - 330
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: National Regulatory Responses, Self-Regulatory Responses, Proposal for Intergovernmental Coordination, Policy Models, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Creating Conventions: Technology Policy and International Cooperation in Criminal Matters

      Page(s): 331 - 373
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Challenges of Jurisdiction and National Technology Policy, Governance Tenders: G8 and CoE, A Topology of Lawful Access, The Discourse, Not about Cybercrime: Discourses and International Regimes, Recommendations on Policy Discourse, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Privacy in the Digital Age: States, Private Actors, and Hybrid Arrangements

      Page(s): 375 - 400
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Evolution of the Privacy Debate and International Institutions, Current Debates on Privacy, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Intellectual Property Rights, Capacity Building, and “Informational Development” in Developing Countries

      Page(s): 401 - 426
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: What Is Intellectual Property?, Incorporating Developing Countries into the TRIPS “Regime”, Global Electronic Networks and Intellectual Property Rights, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Participation of Nondominant Stakeholders in Network Global Governance

      Page(s): 427
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The burgeoning use and transformative impact of global electronic networks are widely recognized to be defining features of contemporary world affairs. Less often noted has been the increasing importance of global governance arrangements in managing the many issues raised in such networks. This volume helps fill the gap by assessing some of the key international institutions pertaining to global telecommunications regulation and standardization, radio frequency spectrum, satellite systems, trade in services, electronic commerce, intellectual property, traditional mass media and Internet content, Internet names and numbers, cybercrime, privacy protection, and development. Eschewing technocratic approaches, the contributors offer empirically rich studies of the international power dynamics shaping these institutions. They devote particular attention to the roles and concerns of nondominant stakeholders, such as developing countries and civil society, and find that global governance often reinforces wider power disparities between and within nation-states. But at the same time, the contributors note, governance arrangements often provide nondominant stakeholders with the policy space needed to advance their interests more effectively. Each chapter concludes with a set of policy recommendations for the promotion of an open, dynamic, and more equitable networld order.ContributorsPeng Hwa Ang, Jonathan D. Aronson, Byung-il Choi, Tracy Cohen, Peter F. Cowhey, William J. Drake, Henry Farrell, Rob Frieden, Alison Gillwald, Boutheina Guermazi, Cees J. Hamelink, Ian Hosein, Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, Don MacLean, Christopher May, Milton Mueller, John Richards, David Souter, Ernest Wilson III, Jisuk Woo. View full abstract»

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      Louder Voices and the International Debate on Developing Country Participation in ICT Decision Making

      Page(s): 429 - 462
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Mapping the International ICT Decision-Making Universe, Assessing the Impact of Developing Countries in International Decision Making, Obstacles to Developing Country Participation, The Louder Voices Program of Action, The Louder Voices Recommendations, Conclusions and Recommendations, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Ambiguities of Participation in the Global Governance of Electronic Networks: Implications for South Africa and Lessons for Developing Countries

      Page(s): 463 - 506
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: South Africa, International Governance Mechanisms, Preferences, Power, and Policy Making, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Spectators or Players? Participation in ICANN by the “Rest of the World”

      Page(s): 507 - 533
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: ICANN as International Governance Regime, Governance Mechanisms, Power and Policy Making, South Korea: A Case Study, ICANN versus a Traditional Intergovernmental Organization, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Multistakeholderism, Civil Society, and Global Diplomacy: The Case of the World Summit on the Information Society

      Page(s): 535 - 582
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: From Westphalia to Multistakeholderism, The Long Road to WSIS, The WSIS Geneva Phase: 2002–2003, The WSIS Tunis Phase, 2004–2005, Looking Forward, Recommendations, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Conclusion: Governance of Global Electronic Networks: The Contrasting Views of Dominant and Nondominant Actors

      Page(s): 583 - 615
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: , Four Guiding Questions, Some Definitions, Question Number One, World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) as a Site of Contestation over Global ICT Governance, Question Number Two, Question Number Three, Question Number Four, Frames, Concepts, Cause and Effect, Details, Dynamics, Downstream Linkages, and Freedom of Choice, Reframing the Question: Introducing the Quad, Conclusions, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Contributors

      Page(s): 617 - 622
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The burgeoning use and transformative impact of global electronic networks are widely recognized to be defining features of contemporary world affairs. Less often noted has been the increasing importance of global governance arrangements in managing the many issues raised in such networks. This volume helps fill the gap by assessing some of the key international institutions pertaining to global telecommunications regulation and standardization, radio frequency spectrum, satellite systems, trade in services, electronic commerce, intellectual property, traditional mass media and Internet content, Internet names and numbers, cybercrime, privacy protection, and development. Eschewing technocratic approaches, the contributors offer empirically rich studies of the international power dynamics shaping these institutions. They devote particular attention to the roles and concerns of nondominant stakeholders, such as developing countries and civil society, and find that global governance often reinforces wider power disparities between and within nation-states. But at the same time, the contributors note, governance arrangements often provide nondominant stakeholders with the policy space needed to advance their interests more effectively. Each chapter concludes with a set of policy recommendations for the promotion of an open, dynamic, and more equitable networld order.ContributorsPeng Hwa Ang, Jonathan D. Aronson, Byung-il Choi, Tracy Cohen, Peter F. Cowhey, William J. Drake, Henry Farrell, Rob Frieden, Alison Gillwald, Boutheina Guermazi, Cees J. Hamelink, Ian Hosein, Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, Don MacLean, Christopher May, Milton Mueller, John Richards, David Souter, Ernest Wilson III, Jisuk Woo. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Page(s): 623 - 664
      Copyright Year: 2008

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The burgeoning use and transformative impact of global electronic networks are widely recognized to be defining features of contemporary world affairs. Less often noted has been the increasing importance of global governance arrangements in managing the many issues raised in such networks. This volume helps fill the gap by assessing some of the key international institutions pertaining to global telecommunications regulation and standardization, radio frequency spectrum, satellite systems, trade in services, electronic commerce, intellectual property, traditional mass media and Internet content, Internet names and numbers, cybercrime, privacy protection, and development. Eschewing technocratic approaches, the contributors offer empirically rich studies of the international power dynamics shaping these institutions. They devote particular attention to the roles and concerns of nondominant stakeholders, such as developing countries and civil society, and find that global governance often reinforces wider power disparities between and within nation-states. But at the same time, the contributors note, governance arrangements often provide nondominant stakeholders with the policy space needed to advance their interests more effectively. Each chapter concludes with a set of policy recommendations for the promotion of an open, dynamic, and more equitable networld order.ContributorsPeng Hwa Ang, Jonathan D. Aronson, Byung-il Choi, Tracy Cohen, Peter F. Cowhey, William J. Drake, Henry Farrell, Rob Frieden, Alison Gillwald, Boutheina Guermazi, Cees J. Hamelink, Ian Hosein, Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, Don MacLean, Christopher May, Milton Mueller, John Richards, David Souter, Ernest Wilson III, Jisuk Woo. View full abstract»