Advancing Knowledge and The Knowledge Economy

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2006
Author(s): Brian Kahin; Dominique Foray
Book Type: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Engineering Profession
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Abstract

The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff

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      Front Matter

      Page(s): i - x
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Title, Copyright, Contents, Preface View full abstract»

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      Prospects for Knowledge Policy

      Page(s): 1 - 8
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Notes View full abstract»

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      Optimizing the Use of Knowledge

      Page(s): 9 - 15
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Efficient and Effective Deployment of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) as Knowledge Instruments, Emergence, Transformation, and Path-Dependent Evolution of Institutions Devoted to the Creation and Transmission of Knowledge, The Coevolution of Technologies and Institutions, Knowledge Division and Dispersion, The Importance of Public Knowledge, Open, Distributed Systems, Toward Evidence-Based Knowledge Policy, Notes View full abstract»

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      OECD Work on Knowledge and the Knowledge Economy

      Page(s): 17 - 23
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Conclusion, Acknowledgments View full abstract»

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      Measuring Knowledge

      Page(s): 25
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      Measuring Knowledge and Its Economic Effects: The Role of Official Statistics

      Page(s): 27 - 42
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, The KBE and Knowledge, Knowledge Activities, Knowledge Linkages, Knowledge Outcomes, Related Characteristics of Institutions and Regions, Learning and Doing, The System, Conclusions, Acknowledgments, References View full abstract»

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      Assessing Innovation Capacity: Fitting Strategy, Indicators, and Policy to the Right Framework

      Page(s): 43 - 59
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Assessing the Problem: The European Union's Relative Productivity Performance, Defining the Targets and Policy Measures, Indicators, Evaluating Performance on the Selected Indicators, Conclusions for the E.U. Policy Process, Does the European Union Have a Systemic Policy Approach?,Evaluating the Choice of Indicators for Improving the Innovative Capacity, Implications for STI Policies, Acknowledgments, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Knowledge Communities

      Page(s): 61
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      Interactive Learning, Social Capital, and Economic Performance

      Page(s): 63 - 74
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Learning as the Major Source of Economic Growth—Pasinetti on Growth and Structural Change, The Division of Labor and the Static Scale Effects, Entering Transaction Costs—Williamson (1975), The Organization of Industry—Richardson's Contribution, Learning by Doing and Learning by Using, Learning by Interacting, Adam Smith and Two Modes of Innovation—DUI and STI, Douglass North on Institutions, Organizations, and Market Competition, Conclusions, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Social Capital, Networks, and Communities of Knowledge

      Page(s): 75 - 89
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Interactions Between Bonding and Bridging Social Capital, Mapping SC in Knowledge Economies, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Knowing Communities in Organizations

      Page(s): 91 - 109
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Knowing Communities: Characteristics, Properties, and Limits, The Nature of Interaction Between Knowing Communities in the Firm, and the Role of the Hierarchy, Knowing Communities and the Innovative Potential of Large Firms, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Changing Role of Institutions

      Page(s): 111
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      Epistemic Infrastructure in the Rise of the Knowledge Economy

      Page(s): 113 - 134
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, The Rise and Role of Epistemic Infrastructure, Epistemic Infrastructure in the Industrial Era: Adaptability of Purpose, Epistemic Infrastructure in the Knowledge Economy, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

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      Universities and the Knowledge Economy

      Page(s): 135 - 149
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, The Linear Model Abdux, The Linear Model Redux, Innovation Ignored, Conclusion, Acknowledgment, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Impact of ICT on Tertiary Education: Advances and Promises

      Page(s): 151 - 168
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Living Up to the Promises: A Quiet Rather Than Radical Revolution, An Innovation Cycle for E-learning, Challenges for the Further Development of E-learning in Tertiary Education: What Sustainable Innovation Model?, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      The Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 and University—Industry Technology Transfer: A Policy Model for Other Governments?

      Page(s): 169 - 189
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, International Policy “Emulation”: Reflections in the Funhouse Mirror, How Does Academic Research Influence Industrial Innovation? A Review of Recent Studies, Origins and Effects of the Bayh-Dole Ac, Origins of the Bayh-Dole Act, Effects of Bayh-Dole, International Emulation of the Bayh-Dole Act, Conclusion, Acknowledgments, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Knowledge and Place

      Page(s): 191
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      The Changing Dynamics of the Global Market for the Highly Skilled

      Page(s): 193 - 216
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: A Nation at Risk?, The United States as the Benchmark, The 1990s: The Tail of the Distribution of Skills, The New Millennium, Policy Challenges, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Knowledge in Space: What Hope for the Poor Parts of the Globe?

      Page(s): 217 - 234
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Knowledge, Growth, and Development: Received Wisdom Reconsidered, Lessons from the Study of European Catch-Up, The Asian Experience, A Conceptual Framework?, Technology and Capacity Competitiveness, Concluding Remarks, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      New Models of Innovation

      Page(s): 235
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      Democratizing Innovation: The Evolving Phenomenon of User Innovation

      Page(s): 237 - 255
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Importance of Innovation by Users, Why Many Users Want Custom Products, Users' Innovate-or-Buy Decisions, Users' Low-Cost Innovation Niches, Why Users Often Freely Reveal Their Innovations, Innovation Communities, Adapting Policy to User Innovation, Diffusion of User-Developed Innovations, Democratizing Innovation, Note, References View full abstract»

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      Innovation, Experimentation, and Technological Change

      Page(s): 257 - 275
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Experimentation and Innovation, Managing Uncertainty, Learning by Experimentation, The Changing Economics of Experimentation, Shifting the Locus of Experimentation to Customers, Innovation Toolkits for Experimenters: Custom Integrated Circuits, Benefits and Challenges of Toolkits, Creating and Capturing Value: Industry Effects, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Knowledge, Platforms, and the Division of Labor

      Page(s): 277 - 297
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Modularity and Platforms, Governing Platforms, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Between “Knowledge” and “The Economy”: Notes on the Scientific Study of Designs

      Page(s): 299 - 328
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Critical Properties of Designs, Design Structure, Design Value, Design Games and the Institutions of Innovation, Scientific Studies of Designs vs. Simon's Science of Design, Acknowledgments, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Models of Control and Cooperation

      Page(s): 329
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      Patent Quantity and Quality: Trends and Policy Implications

      Page(s): 331 - 350
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Patent Numbers and Patent Quality, Incentive Structures in a Vicious Cycle?, Steps Toward Improvements, Acknowledgments, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Blurred Boundaries: Tensions Between Open Scientific Resources and Commercial Exploitation of Knowledge in Biomedical Research

      Page(s): 351 - 368
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, System Performance Versus Component Performance, The Changing Structure of the Pharmaceutical Industry, Factors Driving Structural Change, Consequences for Industry Research Performance, Impact on Academic Science, Conclusions, Acknowledgments, Notes View full abstract»

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      The Economics of Technology Sharing: Open Source and Beyond

      Page(s): 369 - 389
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: A Brief History of Open Source Software, Key Questions on Open Source, Final Thoughts, Acknowledgments, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      “Open and Collaborative” Biomedical Research: Theory and Evidence

      Page(s): 391 - 413
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Open and Collaborative Model in Context, Vertical “Dis-Integration” and Calls for Access, Beyond Access: Open and Collaborative Research, Open and Collaborative Biomedical Research, Open and Collaborative Biomedical Research: A Critical Evaluation, Conclusion, Acknowledgments, Notes View full abstract»

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      Critical Tensions in the Evolution of Open Source Software

      Page(s): 415 - 427
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Collectivist Versus Individualist, OSS as a Paradigm Shift in Software Engineering: The Cathedral Versus the Bazaar, The Alternative Connotations of “Free”, The Emergence of OSS 2.0, “Value for Money” Versus “Acceptable Community Values”, Acceptable Community Values, Conclusions, Acknowledgments, Note, References View full abstract»

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      Emerging Infrastructure

      Page(s): 429
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      Toward a Cyberinfrastructure for Enhanced Scientific Collaboration: Providing Its “Soft” Foundations May Be the Hardest Part

      Page(s): 431 - 453
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Science and Cyberinfrastructure, The Grid and the Expanding Potentialities for e-Science, Collaborations in e-Science: Opportunities and Institutional Impediments, The Legal Framework for Scientific Collaboration—A Brief Overview, Broadening the “Information Commons”, Conclusion: The Challenge of Building an Information Commons for e-Science, Acknowledgments, Notes View full abstract»

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      Cyberinfrastructure-in-the-Making: Can We Get

      Page(s): 455 - 478
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction, Why Is CI So Important?, What Do We Mean by the Socio-Technical Aspects of CI?, Socio-Technical Challenges of an Emerging CI, Working Across Boundaries, Scaling Up, Recommendations for Further Research, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Contributors and Affiliations

      Page(s): 479 - 480
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»

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      Index

      Page(s): 481 - 503
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The revolution in information technology transforms not only information and its uses but, more important, knowledge and the ways we generate and manage it. Knowledge is now seen as input, output, and capital, even if imperfectly accounted for or understood. Many businesses and public agencies are convinced that knowledge can be managed in sophisticated, rational ways and that networking and information technology are essential tools for doing so. In this collection, experts from North America and Europe look at the transformation of knowledge in the global economy in light of the rapid changes in information technology, the resulting explosion of data, the recognition of intangibles as sources of value and liability, and the increasingly blurred distinction between private and public knowledge.The appeal of the Internet as boundary-spanning knowledge infrastructure, bridging all sectors of the economy, is shadowed by another infrastructure of rights-based contracts, practices, and institutions. The contributors address the ways in which the processes for creating and organizing knowledge interact with information technology, business strategy, and changing social and economic conditions. They discuss the balkanization that results from the complexity of the knowledge economy, the variety of knowledge resources, the great diversity of institutional and market contexts, and competing models of control and cooperation--and of proprietary and non-proprietary knowledge.Contributors:Berglind ï¿¿ï¿¿sgeirsdï¿¿ï¿¿ttir, Carliss Y. Baldwin, Kim B. Clark, Iain M. Cockburn, Patrick Cohendet, Robin Cowan, Paul A. David, Jan Fagerberg, Brian Fitzgerald, Dominque Foray, Peter A. Freeman, Fred Gault, Dietmar Harhoff, Margaret Hedstrom, C. Suzanne Iacono, Brian Kahin, John Leslie King, Kurt Larsen, Josh Lerner, Bengt-ï¿¿ï¿¿ke Lundvall, David C. Mowery, Arti K. Rai, Bhaven Sampat, Martin Schaaper, Tom Schuller, W. Edward Steinmueller, Stefan Thomke, Jean Tirole, Reinhilde Veugelers, Stï¿¿ï¿¿phan Vincent-Lancrin, Eric von Hippel, Andrew Wyckoff View full abstract»