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Human Rights in the Global Information Society

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2006
Author(s): Rikke Frank Jørgensen
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Engineering Profession
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Abstract

International organizations, governments, academia, industry, and the media have all begun to grapple with the information society as a global policy issue. The first United Nations World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in December 2003, recognized the connections between information technology and human rights with a Declaration of Principles--in effect, the first "constitution" for cyberspace--that called for the development of the information society to conform to recognized standards of human rights. Critical issues in the policy debates around WSIS have been the so-called digital divide, which reflects a knowledge divide, a social divide, and an economic divide; and the need for a nondiscriminatory information society to provide universal access to information technology in local languages throughout the developing world. Other crucial issues include the regulatory frameworks for information access and ownership and such basic freedoms as the right to privacy. The contributors to this timely volume examine the links between information technology and human rights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Scholars, human rights activists, and practitioners discuss such topics as freedom of expression, access to information, privacy, discrimination, gender equality, intellectual property, political participation, and freedom of assembly in the context of the revolution in information and communication technology, exploring the ways in which the information society can either advance human rights around the world or threaten them. An afterword reports on the November 2005 WSIS, held in Tunis, and its reaffirmation of the fundamental role of human rights in the global information society.Contributors:David Banisar, William Drake, Ran Greenstein, Anriett e Esterhuysen, Robin Gross, Gus Hosein, Heike Jensen, Rikke Frank Jï¿¿ï¿¿rgensen, Hans Klein, Charley Lewis, Meryem Marzouki, Birgitte Kofod Olsen, Kay Raseroka, Adama Samassï¿¿ï¿¿kou, Mandana Zarrehparvar

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      Front Matter

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): i - 49
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, The Information Revolution and Global Politics, Title, Copyright, Contents, Foreword, Human Rights in the Global Information Society, Introduction View full abstract»

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      Freedom of Expression, Access to Information, and Privacy Protection

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 51
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      International organizations, governments, academia, industry, and the media have all begun to grapple with the information society as a global policy issue. The first United Nations World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in December 2003, recognized the connections between information technology and human rights with a Declaration of Principles--in effect, the first "constitution" for cyberspace--that called for the development of the information society to conform to recognized standards of human rights. Critical issues in the policy debates around WSIS have been the so-called digital divide, which reflects a knowledge divide, a social divide, and an economic divide; and the need for a nondiscriminatory information society to provide universal access to information technology in local languages throughout the developing world. Other crucial issues include the regulatory frameworks for information access and ownership and such basic freedoms as the right to privacy. The contributors to this timely volume examine the links between information technology and human rights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Scholars, human rights activists, and practitioners discuss such topics as freedom of expression, access to information, privacy, discrimination, gender equality, intellectual property, political participation, and freedom of assembly in the context of the revolution in information and communication technology, exploring the ways in which the information society can either advance human rights around the world or threaten them. An afterword reports on the November 2005 WSIS, held in Tunis, and its reaffirmation of the fundamental role of human rights in the global information society.Contributors:David Banisar, William Drake, Ran Greenstein, Anriett e Esterhuysen, Robin Gross, Gus Hosein, Heike Jensen, Rikke Frank Jï¿¿ï¿¿rgensen, Hans Klein, Charley Lewis, Meryem Marzouki, Birgitte Kofod Olsen, Kay Raseroka, Adama Samassï¿¿ï¿¿kou, Mandana Zarrehparvar View full abstract»

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      The Right to Express Oneself and to Seek Information

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 53 - 71
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Background and Spirit of Freedom of Expression, The Freedoms Protected, Freedom of Expression Challenges in the Information Society, Principles and Possible Actions for Effective Implementation of Freedom of Expression in the Information Society, Notes, References, European Court of Human Rights, Other Courts View full abstract»

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      The Right to Information in the Age of Information

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 73 - 89
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Benefits of the Right to Information, History of the Right to Information, Basic Elements of Right-to-Information Laws, Other Laws Providing Access to Information, Problems with Implementation of Freedom-of-Information Laws, The International Basis of RTI, Modernization and the Information Society, Conclusion, Appendix 6.1 National Freedom-of-Information Laws, Notes View full abstract»

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      Access to Information and Knowledge

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 91 - 105
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Literacy and the Information Society, Orality and Communication of Information, Transformation of Libraries into Facilitators of People-Centered Information Services, New Frontiers for Empowerment of Populations, Communities, and Individuals, Linkage Efforts: Orality, Information, and Technology, Case Study, Conclusion, References View full abstract»

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      Intellectual Property Rights and the Information Commons

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 107 - 120
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Dispelling the “Intellectual Property” Myths, Expanding Copyrights Threaten Traditional Rights, Anti-Circumvention Laws to Enforce Technical Restrictions, Shrinking Private Copying Rights, Liability of Innocent Third Parties, Database Rights: Exclusive Ownership of Facts and Information, Severe Enforcement of Intellectual Property Laws, Copyright Term Extensions, New Broadcasters' Rights, “Maximalist” U.S. Agenda Exported Overseas, Communication Rights for an Information Age, Conclusion: Communication Rights Are Human Rights in an Information Society, View full abstract»

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      Privacy as Freedom

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 121 - 147
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Privacy and Freedom, Privacy as a Threat, Secondary to Other Rights, Privacy as Law and Regulation, Informational Privacy, Key Threats to Privacy in the Information Society, Surveillance of All Activity, Privacy as Freedom, Privacy in an Open Information Society, Notes View full abstract»

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      Freedom of Association, Participation, and Procedural Protections

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 150
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      International organizations, governments, academia, industry, and the media have all begun to grapple with the information society as a global policy issue. The first United Nations World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in December 2003, recognized the connections between information technology and human rights with a Declaration of Principles--in effect, the first "constitution" for cyberspace--that called for the development of the information society to conform to recognized standards of human rights. Critical issues in the policy debates around WSIS have been the so-called digital divide, which reflects a knowledge divide, a social divide, and an economic divide; and the need for a nondiscriminatory information society to provide universal access to information technology in local languages throughout the developing world. Other crucial issues include the regulatory frameworks for information access and ownership and such basic freedoms as the right to privacy. The contributors to this timely volume examine the links between information technology and human rights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Scholars, human rights activists, and practitioners discuss such topics as freedom of expression, access to information, privacy, discrimination, gender equality, intellectual property, political participation, and freedom of assembly in the context of the revolution in information and communication technology, exploring the ways in which the information society can either advance human rights around the world or threaten them. An afterword reports on the November 2005 WSIS, held in Tunis, and its reaffirmation of the fundamental role of human rights in the global information society.Contributors:David Banisar, William Drake, Ran Greenstein, Anriett e Esterhuysen, Robin Gross, Gus Hosein, Heike Jensen, Rikke Frank Jï¿¿ï¿¿rgensen, Hans Klein, Charley Lewis, Meryem Marzouki, Birgitte Kofod Olsen, Kay Raseroka, Adama Samassï¿¿ï¿¿kou, Mandana Zarrehparvar View full abstract»

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      The Right of Assembly and Freedom of Association in the Information Age

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 151 - 183
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Zimbabwe, 2003m, Association and Assembly in the Information Age, Unions Online, Online Rights Under Attack, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

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      The Right to Political Participation and the Information Society

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 185 - 196
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Right to Political Participation, Society in the Information Age, The Information Society, Conclusion, References View full abstract»

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      The “Guarantee Rights” for Realizing the Rule of Law

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 197 - 218
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Historical and Legal Background, “Guarantee Rights” as Part of the Realization of the Rule of Law, Challenges to “Guarantee Rights” in the Information Society, Extending the Prerogatives of Police Forces, Extending the Prerogatives of ISPs and Other Private Parties, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Equal Treatment and Development

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 150
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      International organizations, governments, academia, industry, and the media have all begun to grapple with the information society as a global policy issue. The first United Nations World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in December 2003, recognized the connections between information technology and human rights with a Declaration of Principles--in effect, the first "constitution" for cyberspace--that called for the development of the information society to conform to recognized standards of human rights. Critical issues in the policy debates around WSIS have been the so-called digital divide, which reflects a knowledge divide, a social divide, and an economic divide; and the need for a nondiscriminatory information society to provide universal access to information technology in local languages throughout the developing world. Other crucial issues include the regulatory frameworks for information access and ownership and such basic freedoms as the right to privacy. The contributors to this timely volume examine the links between information technology and human rights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Scholars, human rights activists, and practitioners discuss such topics as freedom of expression, access to information, privacy, discrimination, gender equality, intellectual property, political participation, and freedom of assembly in the context of the revolution in information and communication technology, exploring the ways in which the information society can either advance human rights around the world or threaten them. An afterword reports on the November 2005 WSIS, held in Tunis, and its reaffirmation of the fundamental role of human rights in the global information society.Contributors:David Banisar, William Drake, Ran Greenstein, Anriett e Esterhuysen, Robin Gross, Gus Hosein, Heike Jensen, Rikke Frank Jï¿¿ï¿¿rgensen, Hans Klein, Charley Lewis, Meryem Marzouki, Birgitte Kofod Olsen, Kay Raseroka, Adama Samassï¿¿ï¿¿kou, Mandana Zarrehparvar View full abstract»

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      A Nondiscriminatory Information Society

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 221 - 234
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Principle of Nondiscrimination, Nondiscrimination and ICT, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

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      Women's Human Rights in the Information Society

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 235 - 261
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Articulating Women's Human Rights Provisions at the UN Level, ICTs as Tools: Whose Tools and Tools for What?, ICTs as Careers: Whose Careers?, ICT Ideology: Whose Ideology?, Conclusion, Notes, References View full abstract»

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      Ensuring Minority Rights in a Pluralistic and “Liquid” Information Society

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 263 - 280
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Traditional Minority Protection, The Term “Minority”: Now and in a Future Perspective, Basic Principles for Minority Protection, Specific Minority Rights, Challenges of Digitizing Minority Rights, Monitoring Minority Rights in a Digitized Setting, Multicultural Jurisdictions, Public or Private Governance of the Internet, Concluding Remarks, Notes, Bibliography View full abstract»

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      The Right to Development in the Information Society

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 281 - 302
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Right to Development, Rights in the International Context, Development, Rights, and ICTs, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

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      About the Authors

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 303 - 308
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      International organizations, governments, academia, industry, and the media have all begun to grapple with the information society as a global policy issue. The first United Nations World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in December 2003, recognized the connections between information technology and human rights with a Declaration of Principles--in effect, the first "constitution" for cyberspace--that called for the development of the information society to conform to recognized standards of human rights. Critical issues in the policy debates around WSIS have been the so-called digital divide, which reflects a knowledge divide, a social divide, and an economic divide; and the need for a nondiscriminatory information society to provide universal access to information technology in local languages throughout the developing world. Other crucial issues include the regulatory frameworks for information access and ownership and such basic freedoms as the right to privacy. The contributors to this timely volume examine the links between information technology and human rights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Scholars, human rights activists, and practitioners discuss such topics as freedom of expression, access to information, privacy, discrimination, gender equality, intellectual property, political participation, and freedom of assembly in the context of the revolution in information and communication technology, exploring the ways in which the information society can either advance human rights around the world or threaten them. An afterword reports on the November 2005 WSIS, held in Tunis, and its reaffirmation of the fundamental role of human rights in the global information society.Contributors:David Banisar, William Drake, Ran Greenstein, Anriett e Esterhuysen, Robin Gross, Gus Hosein, Heike Jensen, Rikke Frank Jï¿¿ï¿¿rgensen, Hans Klein, Charley Lewis, Meryem Marzouki, Birgitte Kofod Olsen, Kay Raseroka, Adama Samassï¿¿ï¿¿kou, Mandana Zarrehparvar View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Afterword: The Tunis Commitment

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 309 - 310
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      International organizations, governments, academia, industry, and the media have all begun to grapple with the information society as a global policy issue. The first United Nations World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in December 2003, recognized the connections between information technology and human rights with a Declaration of Principles--in effect, the first "constitution" for cyberspace--that called for the development of the information society to conform to recognized standards of human rights. Critical issues in the policy debates around WSIS have been the so-called digital divide, which reflects a knowledge divide, a social divide, and an economic divide; and the need for a nondiscriminatory information society to provide universal access to information technology in local languages throughout the developing world. Other crucial issues include the regulatory frameworks for information access and ownership and such basic freedoms as the right to privacy. The contributors to this timely volume examine the links between information technology and human rights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Scholars, human rights activists, and practitioners discuss such topics as freedom of expression, access to information, privacy, discrimination, gender equality, intellectual property, political participation, and freedom of assembly in the context of the revolution in information and communication technology, exploring the ways in which the information society can either advance human rights around the world or threaten them. An afterword reports on the November 2005 WSIS, held in Tunis, and its reaffirmation of the fundamental role of human rights in the global information society.Contributors:David Banisar, William Drake, Ran Greenstein, Anriett e Esterhuysen, Robin Gross, Gus Hosein, Heike Jensen, Rikke Frank Jï¿¿ï¿¿rgensen, Hans Klein, Charley Lewis, Meryem Marzouki, Birgitte Kofod Olsen, Kay Raseroka, Adama Samassï¿¿ï¿¿kou, Mandana Zarrehparvar View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Rikke Frank Jørgensen Page(s): 311 - 325
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      International organizations, governments, academia, industry, and the media have all begun to grapple with the information society as a global policy issue. The first United Nations World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in December 2003, recognized the connections between information technology and human rights with a Declaration of Principles--in effect, the first "constitution" for cyberspace--that called for the development of the information society to conform to recognized standards of human rights. Critical issues in the policy debates around WSIS have been the so-called digital divide, which reflects a knowledge divide, a social divide, and an economic divide; and the need for a nondiscriminatory information society to provide universal access to information technology in local languages throughout the developing world. Other crucial issues include the regulatory frameworks for information access and ownership and such basic freedoms as the right to privacy. The contributors to this timely volume examine the links between information technology and human rights from a range of disciplinary perspectives. Scholars, human rights activists, and practitioners discuss such topics as freedom of expression, access to information, privacy, discrimination, gender equality, intellectual property, political participation, and freedom of assembly in the context of the revolution in information and communication technology, exploring the ways in which the information society can either advance human rights around the world or threaten them. An afterword reports on the November 2005 WSIS, held in Tunis, and its reaffirmation of the fundamental role of human rights in the global information society.Contributors:David Banisar, William Drake, Ran Greenstein, Anriett e Esterhuysen, Robin Gross, Gus Hosein, Heike Jensen, Rikke Frank Jï¿¿ï¿¿rgensen, Hans Klein, Charley Lewis, Meryem Marzouki, Birgitte Kofod Olsen, Kay Raseroka, Adama Samassï¿¿ï¿¿kou, Mandana Zarrehparvar View full abstract»