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Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2006
Author(s): Ito, M.; Matsuda, M.; Okabe, D.
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: General Topics for Engineers (Math, Science & Engineering)
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Abstract

The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life.

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      Front Matter

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): i - 16
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, Title, Copyright, Dedication, Contents, Acknowledgments, Editors' Note on Translation, Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, Introduction: Personal, Portable, Pedestrian View full abstract»

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      The Social and Cultural Construction of Technological Systems

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 17
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Discourses of Keitai in Japan

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 19 - 39
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Keitai, Not Mobile Phone, The Keitai Research Network, From a Business Tool to a Youth Medium, Moral Panic, Keitai and the Transformation of Interpersonal Relations, The Success of i-mode and Technonationalism, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

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      Youth Culture and the Shaping of Japanese Mobile Media: Personalization and the Keitai Internet as Multimedia

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 41 - 60
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Materials, Personalization, Mobile Media as Multimedia, Note View full abstract»

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      A Decade in the Development of Mobile Communications in Japan (1993–2002)

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 61 - 74
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Privatization and the Birth of the Mobile Communications Industry in Japan, The Shift from Pagers to Keitai in the Mid-1990s, NTT DoCoMo's Success, Current Developments, Personalization in Communication, Notes View full abstract»

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      Cultures and Imaginaries

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 75
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The Third-Stage Paradigm: Territory Machines from the Girls' Pager Revolution to Mobile Aesthetics

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 77 - 101
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: A Paradigm as an Aggregate of Dissimilar Cultures, Nagara Mobilism and Japanese Tradition, Keitai's Tranformation to a Refreshing Favorite and Possibilities for Keitai Aesthetics, The Anti-Ubiquitous Territory Machine, Notes View full abstract»

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      Japanese Youth and the Imagining of Keitai

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 103 - 119
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Project Background, Keitai and Everyday Cyberspaces, Production Case Studies, Tales of Encounters, Conclusion: The Demise of Keitai Stories? View full abstract»

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      Social Networks and Relationships

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 121
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Mobile Communication and Selective Sociality

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 123 - 142
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: E-mail-Centered Keitai Internet, Kaeru Calls and Appointments, Ban-tsuu Sentaku, Selective Interpersonal Relationships, Notes View full abstract»

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      The Mobile-izing Japanese: Connecting to the Internet by PC and Webphone in Yamanashi

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 143 - 164
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Internet Use in Japan, The Shift from Solidary to Networked Communities, Mobile Culture in Japan and Around the World—An Emphasis on Youth, Internet Users in Yamanashi, Age, Gender and Mobile/PC Use, Webphone and PC Contact with Social Networks, The Networks of Webphone and PC E-mail Users, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

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      Accelerating Reflexivity

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 165 - 182
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Deai in Context, Method and Data, Transformation of Deai Culture, Increase in Possible Choices of Others and Ontological Insecurity, Increase in Possible Alternatives, Telecocoons, Discussion, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

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      Keitai and the Intimate Stranger

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 183 - 201
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Intimate Stranger, Voice Services and the Origins of the Intimate Stranger, Deai Online, Keitai Networks: From Online Community to Personal Networks, Discussion: Anonymity and Online Personas, Conclusion View full abstract»

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      Practice and Place

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 121
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Keitai in Public Transportation

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 205 - 217
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Research Framework, Keitai in Japanese Trains Today, Keitai Involvements, The Historical Development of Keitai Manners for Trains, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      The Gendered Use of Keitai in Domestic Contexts

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 219 - 236
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Home, the Housewife, and Keitai, Mobility of Domestic Activities and Mobility of Keitai, Managing Family Relationships, Sense of Ownership of Keitai, The Housewife as a Sociotechnical Entity, Notes View full abstract»

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      Design of Keitai Technology and Its Use among Service Engineers

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 237 - 255
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Approach and Framework, Ethnography of Keitai Use in the Workplace, Keitai as Technology That Makes the Service Area Visible, Restructuring the Relation between the Call Center and the Field, Design Process: Construction of the Design Network, Reconsidering the Meaning of Keitai in the Workplace View full abstract»

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      Technosocial Situations: Emergent Structuring of Mobile E-mail Use

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 257 - 273
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Method and Conceptual Framework, Mobile Text Chat, Ambient Virtual Co-Presence, The Augmented “Flesh Meet”, From Technosocial Situations to Technosocial Orders, Notes View full abstract»

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      Emergent Developments

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 275
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Keitai Use among Japanese Elementary and Junior High School Students

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 277 - 299
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Children and Keitai, The Survey, Schools' Views on Keitai, Conclusion, Notes View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Uses and Possibilities of the Keitai Camera

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 301 - 310
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Keitai Cameras, Current Use Patterns, Emergent Social and Cultural Dynamics, Notes View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      References

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 311 - 339
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Contributors

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 341 - 343
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Ito, M. ; Matsuda, M. ; Okabe, D.
      Personal, Portable, Pedestrian:Mobile Phones in Japanese Life

      Page(s): 345 - 357
      Copyright Year: 2006

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      The Japanese term for mobile phone, keitai (roughly translated as "something you carry with you"), evokes not technical capability or freedom of movement but intimacy and portability, defining a personal accessory that allows constant social connection. Japan's enthusiastic engagement with mobile technology has become -- along with anime, manga, and sushi -- part of its trendsetting popular culture. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian, the first book-length English-language treatment of mobile communication use in Japan, covers the transformation of keitai from business tool to personal device for communication and play.The essays in this groundbreaking collection document the emergence, incorporation, and domestication of mobile communications in a wide range of social practices and institutions. The book first considers the social, cultural, and historical context of keitai development, including its beginnings in youth pager use in the early 1990s. It then discusses the virtually seamless integration of keitai use into everyday life, contrasting it to the more escapist character of Internet use on the PC. Other essays suggest that the use of mobile communication reinforces ties between close friends and family, producing "tele-cocooning" by tight-knit social groups. The book also discusses mobile phone manners and examines keitai use by copier technicians, multitasking housewives, and school children. Personal, Portable, Pedestrian describes a mobile universe in which networked relations are a pervasive and persistent fixture of everyday life. View full abstract»