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Mobile Communication and Society:A Global Perspective

Cover Image Copyright Year: 2007
Author(s): Manuel Castells; Mireia Fernández-Ardèvol; Jack Linchuan Qiu; Araba Sey
Publisher: MIT Press
Content Type : Books & eBooks
Topics: Communication, Networking & Broadcasting
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Abstract

Wireless networks are the fastest growing communications technology in history. Are mobile phones expressions of identity, fashionable gadgets, tools for life--or all of the above? Mobile Communication and Society looks at how the possibility of multimodal communication from anywhere to anywhere at any time affects everyday life at home, at work, and at school, and raises broader concerns about politics and culture both global and local.Drawing on data gathered from around the world, the authors explore who has access to wireless technology, and why, and analyze the patterns of social differentiation seen in unequal access. They explore the social effects of wireless communication--what it means for family life, for example, when everyone is constantly in touch, or for the idea of an office when workers can work anywhere. Is the technological ability to multitask further compressing time in our already hurried existence?The authors consider the rise of a mobile youth culture based on peer-to-peer networks, with its own language of texting, and its own values. They examine the phenomenon of flash mobs, and the possible political implications. And they look at the relationship between communication and development and the possibility that developing countries could "leapfrog" directly to wireless and satellite technology. This sweeping book--moving easily in its analysis from the United States to China, from Europe to Latin America and Africa--answers the key questions about our transformation into a mobile network society.

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      Front Matter

      Page(s): i - 6
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Half Title, The Information Revolution & Global Politics, Title, Copyright, Contents, List of Figures, List of Tables, Acknowledgments, Opening: Our Networks, Our Lives View full abstract»

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      The Diffusion of Wireless Communication in the World

      Page(s): 7 - 38
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Global Diffusion of Mobile Telephony, Regional Diffusion of Mobile Telephony, Diffusion of Wireless Communication Technologies in Selected Areas and Countries, Trends in Mobile Data Diffusion, Factors Accounting for Differences in Penetration Rates of Wireless Communication Technology, Summary View full abstract»

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      The Social Differentiation of Wireless Communication Users: Age, Gender, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status

      Page(s): 39 - 75
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Is There an Age Divide?, The Gendering of Mobile Communication: Myth and Reality, Haves and Have-Nots in the Mobile Universe: The Class Dimension of Wireless Communication, Wireless Communication for Lower-Income Groups: When Class Shapes Technology, Community out of Necessity: Collective Sharing, Ethnicity, Culture, and the Uses of Mobile Communication, Summary View full abstract»

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      Communication and Mobility in Everyday Life

      Page(s): 77 - 126
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Mobility at Work, Micro-coordinated Families, The Transformation of Sociability, Personal Safety and Security, Public Services via Mobile Devices, Consumption, Entertainment, and Fashion in Wireless Communication, Mobile Communication in a Troubled World: Technology, Risk, and Fears, Summary View full abstract»

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      The Mobile Youth Culture

      Page(s): 127 - 169
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: The Diffusion and Use of Mobile Telephony among Young People, Youth Culture in the Network Society, The Management of Autonomy vis à vis Security, The Construction of a Peer Group through Networked Sociability, The Emergence of Collective Identity, Strengthening of Individual Identity and the Formation of Fashion, Projects of Autonomy as Principle of Orientation for People, Entertainment, Games, and Media, Summary View full abstract»

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      The Space of Flows, Timeless Time, and Mobile Networks

      Page(s): 171 - 178
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Wireless networks are the fastest growing communications technology in history. Are mobile phones expressions of identity, fashionable gadgets, tools for life--or all of the above? Mobile Communication and Society looks at how the possibility of multimodal communication from anywhere to anywhere at any time affects everyday life at home, at work, and at school, and raises broader concerns about politics and culture both global and local.Drawing on data gathered from around the world, the authors explore who has access to wireless technology, and why, and analyze the patterns of social differentiation seen in unequal access. They explore the social effects of wireless communication--what it means for family life, for example, when everyone is constantly in touch, or for the idea of an office when workers can work anywhere. Is the technological ability to multitask further compressing time in our already hurried existence?The authors consider the rise of a mobile youth culture based on peer-to-peer networks, with its own language of texting, and its own values. They examine the phenomenon of flash mobs, and the possible political implications. And they look at the relationship between communication and development and the possibility that developing countries could "leapfrog" directly to wireless and satellite technology. This sweeping book--moving easily in its analysis from the United States to China, from Europe to Latin America and Africa--answers the key questions about our transformation into a mobile network society. View full abstract»

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      The Language of Wireless Communication

      Page(s): 179 - 184
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Texting, From SMS to MMS, Mobile Orality, A New Language? View full abstract»

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      The Mobile Civil Society: Social Movements, Political Power, and Communication Networks

      Page(s): 185 - 213
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Rethinking Development and Communication: Issues at Stake, Alternative Uses and Alternative Modes of Access, The View from the Ground: Case Studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, Summary View full abstract»

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      Wireless Communication and Global Development: New Issues, New Strategies

      Page(s): 215 - 243
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Rethinking Development and Communication: Issues at Stake, Alternative Uses and Alternative Modes of Access, The View from the Ground: Case Studies in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, Summary View full abstract»

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      Conclusion: The Mobile Network Society

      Page(s): 245 - 258
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Safe Autonomy, Relentless Connectivity, Networks of Choice, Instant Communities of Practice, The Blurring of the Social Context of Individual Practice, Access to the Wireless Network as a Source of Personal Value and as a Social Right, Users Are the Producers of Content and Services, Consumerism, Fashion, Instrumentality, and Meaning, The Transformation of Language, Communication Autonomy, Information Networks, and Sociopolitical Change, The Social Problems of a Wireless World, Mobile Communication and the Network Society View full abstract»

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      Notes

      Page(s): 259 - 271
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      This chapter contains sections titled: Chapter 1 The Diffusion of Wireless Communication in the World, Chapter 2 The Social Differentiation of Wireless Communication Users: Age, Gender, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status, Chapter 3 Communication and Mobility in Everyday Life, Chapter 4 The Mobile Youth Culture, Chapter 5 The Space of Flows, Timeless Time, and Mobile Networks, Chapter 6 The Language of Wireless Communication, Chapter 7 The Mobile Civil Society: Social Movements, Political Power, and Communication Networks, Chapter 8 Wireless Communication and Global Development: New Issues, New Strategies View full abstract»

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      References

      Page(s): 273 - 322
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Wireless networks are the fastest growing communications technology in history. Are mobile phones expressions of identity, fashionable gadgets, tools for life--or all of the above? Mobile Communication and Society looks at how the possibility of multimodal communication from anywhere to anywhere at any time affects everyday life at home, at work, and at school, and raises broader concerns about politics and culture both global and local.Drawing on data gathered from around the world, the authors explore who has access to wireless technology, and why, and analyze the patterns of social differentiation seen in unequal access. They explore the social effects of wireless communication--what it means for family life, for example, when everyone is constantly in touch, or for the idea of an office when workers can work anywhere. Is the technological ability to multitask further compressing time in our already hurried existence?The authors consider the rise of a mobile youth culture based on peer-to-peer networks, with its own language of texting, and its own values. They examine the phenomenon of flash mobs, and the possible political implications. And they look at the relationship between communication and development and the possibility that developing countries could "leapfrog" directly to wireless and satellite technology. This sweeping book--moving easily in its analysis from the United States to China, from Europe to Latin America and Africa--answers the key questions about our transformation into a mobile network society. View full abstract»

    • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

      Index

      Page(s): 323 - 331
      Copyright Year: 2007

      MIT Press eBook Chapters

      Wireless networks are the fastest growing communications technology in history. Are mobile phones expressions of identity, fashionable gadgets, tools for life--or all of the above? Mobile Communication and Society looks at how the possibility of multimodal communication from anywhere to anywhere at any time affects everyday life at home, at work, and at school, and raises broader concerns about politics and culture both global and local.Drawing on data gathered from around the world, the authors explore who has access to wireless technology, and why, and analyze the patterns of social differentiation seen in unequal access. They explore the social effects of wireless communication--what it means for family life, for example, when everyone is constantly in touch, or for the idea of an office when workers can work anywhere. Is the technological ability to multitask further compressing time in our already hurried existence?The authors consider the rise of a mobile youth culture based on peer-to-peer networks, with its own language of texting, and its own values. They examine the phenomenon of flash mobs, and the possible political implications. And they look at the relationship between communication and development and the possibility that developing countries could "leapfrog" directly to wireless and satellite technology. This sweeping book--moving easily in its analysis from the United States to China, from Europe to Latin America and Africa--answers the key questions about our transformation into a mobile network society. View full abstract»