Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Glacier surface motion computation from digital image sequences

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Evans, A.N. ; Dept. of Electron. & Electr. Eng., Bath Univ., UK

A technique for computing the field of short-term glacier surface motion on a local scale is presented. Time-lapsed image negatives, digitized to a high resolution, provide the raw data for the three-stage technique. First, cross-correlation is used to establish a number of candidate displacement vectors for a series of regularly spaced templates. A relaxation-labeling routine is then applied to select the most appropriate candidate vectors, according to the local flow. Novel aspects of the relaxation algorithm include a new, efficient form of the support function and the absence of a null-match category. A new development is the application of a post filter to the resultant flow field, providing suitable displacement vectors for templates that were originally unmatched and correcting vectors that are still inconsistent with the local flow. Results from an image sequence from New Zealand's Mount Cook National Park show the superiority of the technique over the maximum cross-correlation method and demonstrate the effectiveness of the post filter in improving correlation-relaxation labeling

Published in:

Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:38 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

Mar 2000

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.