Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Using digital signal processing to transcribe polyphonic music

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $31
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)

The aim of the project described in this paper is to produce a system which could automatically convert recordings of musical performances to musical notation. The system should be able to handle multiple instruments playing simultaneously. Musicians often need to analyse and transcribe recorded performances, to reproduce or rearrange works for their own performances, or to find out how particular musical effects are achieved. This is a task requiring a good musical ear and plenty of practice. Very short or quiet notes, inner parts in large chordal voicings, parts written with the intention of being an inconspicuous harmonic or rhythmic background, etc. can all cause difficulties for the human ear. Using DSP for this process is a very obvious idea. All the required information is clearly present in the signal, frequency analysis techniques are well established and cheap processing power is available in the home PC market. Suitably priced such a product would probably sell well among musicians. There are a variety of commercial products on the market to notate or harmonise single melodic lines, but packages which could handle an entire band or orchestra do not seem to be available

Published in:

Audio and Music Technology: The Challenge of Creative DSP (Ref. No. 1998/470), IEE Colloquium on

Date of Conference:

18 Nov 1998

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.