Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Is blind channel estimation feasible in mobile communication systems? A study based on GSM

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

3 Author(s)
Boss, D. ; Dept. of Telecommun., Bremen Univ., Germany ; Kammeyer, K.-D. ; Petermann, T.

We compare the effect of blind and nonblind channel estimates on the performance of Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) receivers. More precisely, we investigate whether two blind approaches, based on higher order statistics (HOS), can compete with two conventional methods, exploiting training sequences. For blind and nonblind estimates of six fast and slowly fading mobile radio channels, we give simulated bit error rates (BERs), after Viterbi detection, in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We also study the influence of cochannel interferers at different values of the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR). Averaged over the six channel examples, we demonstrate that the blind channel estimation algorithm eigenvector approach to blind identification (EVI) leads to an SNR loss of 1.2-1.3 dB only, while it saves the 22% overhead in GSM data rate caused by the transmission of training sequences. Since just 142 samples are used for blind channel estimation, we consider this performance outstanding for an approach based on HOS

Published in:

Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on  (Volume:16 ,  Issue: 8 )

Date of Publication:

Oct 1998

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.