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Spectrum sharing issues on both sides of the atlantic

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Possible increased sharing of spectrum is being considered on both sides of the Atlantic as spectrum needs increase rapidly with increased mobile use for broadband. In addition, the success of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have resulted in a demand for unlicensed spectrum (also called ?????????license exempt????????? spectrum and ?????????collective use of spectrum????????? (CUS) in some countries) with a possibly lower availability than traditional licensed spectrum. In the past it was generally possible to meet evolving spectrum needs of various incumbent and prospective users by either dividing spectrum up into bands that were exclusive to one class of users or shared between users with special characteristics that facilitated sharing, or using more efficient modulation technology or system design to increase spectrum efficiency to meet demand. But now there is a vanishingly small amount of potential mobile spectrum in industrialized countries that is either idle or easily repurposed from existing uses. Thus there is growing interest in exploring spectrum sharing in a number of countries although those seeking new spectrum access generally would prefer a traditional exclusive allocation.ossible increased sharing of spectrum is being considered on both sides of the Atlantic as spectrum needs increase rapidly with increased mobile use for broadband. In addition, the success of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have resulted in a demand for unlicensed spectrum (also called ?????????license exempt????????? spectrum and ?????????collective use of spectrum????????? (CUS) in some countries) with a possibly lower availability than traditional licensed spectrum. In the past it was generally possible to meet evolving spectrum needs of various incumbent and prospective users by either dividing spectrum up into bands that were exclusive to one class of users or shared between users with special characteristics that facilitated sharing, or using more efficient modulation technology or system design- to increase spectrum efficiency to meet demand. But now there is a vanishingly small amount of potential mobile spectrum in industrialized countries that is either idle or easily repurposed from existing uses. Thus there is growing interest in exploring spectrum sharing in a number of countries although those seeking new spectrum access generally would prefer a traditional exclusive allocation.

Published in:

Wireless Communications, IEEE  (Volume:19 ,  Issue: 6 )