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Discovering Temporal Change Patterns in the Presence of Taxonomies

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1 Author(s)
Cagliero, L. ; Dipt. di Autom. e Inf., Politec. di Torino, Turin, Italy

Frequent itemset mining is a widely exploratory technique that focuses on discovering recurrent correlations among data. The steadfast evolution of markets and business environments prompts the need of data mining algorithms to discover significant correlation changes in order to reactively suit product and service provision to customer needs. Change mining, in the context of frequent itemsets, focuses on detecting and reporting significant changes in the set of mined itemsets from one time period to another. The discovery of frequent generalized itemsets, i.e., itemsets that 1) frequently occur in the source data, and 2) provide a high-level abstraction of the mined knowledge, issues new challenges in the analysis of itemsets that become rare, and thus are no longer extracted, from a certain point. This paper proposes a novel kind of dynamic pattern, namely the History GENeralized Pattern (HIGEN), that represents the evolution of an itemset in consecutive time periods, by reporting the information about its frequent generalizations characterized by minimal redundancy (i.e., minimum level of abstraction) in case it becomes infrequent in a certain time period. To address HIGEN mining, it proposes HIGEN MINER, an algorithm that focuses on avoiding itemset mining followed by postprocessing by exploiting a support-driven itemset generalization approach. To focus the attention on the minimally redundant frequent generalizations and thus reduce the amount of the generated patterns, the discovery of a smart subset of HIGENs, namely the NONREDUNDANT HIGENs, is addressed as well. Experiments performed on both real and synthetic datasets show the efficiency and the effectiveness of the proposed approach as well as its usefulness in a real application context.

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Knowledge and Data Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:25 ,  Issue: 3 )