By Topic

Numerical testing of the Fowler–Nordheim equation for the electronic field emission from a flat metal and proposition for an improved equation

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $31
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Mayer, A. ; Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, University of Namur-FUNDP, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur, Belgium

Your organization might have access to this article on the publisher's site. To check, click on this link:http://dx.doi.org/+10.1116/1.3455495 

The author uses a transfer-matrix technique to simulate field electronic emission from a flat metal. He compares, in particular, the results provided by this numerical scheme with those predicted by the standard Fowler–Nordheim equation. He considers for this study electric fields between 1 and 10 V/nm as well as work functions between 1.5 and 5 eV. The results demonstrate that the Fowler–Nordheim theory and the transfer-matrix calculations are globally in good agreement. With the Fermi energy of 10 eV considered in this work, the results provided by the standard Fowler–Nordheim equation are, however, systematically larger than the quantum-mechanical result, especially for low values of the work function and for high electric fields. This is essentially due to the fact the standard Fowler–Nordheim theory relies on the simple Jeffreys–Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation for evaluating the electronic transmission through the surface barrier of the emitter. A correction factor is thus established that enables the temperature-dependent version of the standard Fowler–Nordheim equation to match the exact quantum-mechanical result.

Published in:

Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology B: Microelectronics and Nanometer Structures  (Volume:28 ,  Issue: 4 )