Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Functional Electronic Model of the Frog Retina

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

2 Author(s)
Herscher, M.B. ; Applied Research, RCA, Camden, N. J. ; Kelley, T.P.

Based on some earlier concepts, a functional electronic model of the frog retina has been designed and constructed. This system duplicates functionally the four image-feature-abstraction process found by Lettvin and co-workers in the frog retina. From the input image, the model abstracts 1) edges, 2) moving convexities, 3) contrast changes, and 4) net dimming. Information presented to the receptors flows in a parallel mode through successive separate processing layers of the model; this information is preserved as it flows as a transformed "map" of the input image. Finally, the processed information is displayed as a spatial map of the four abstracted features of the input image, similar to the "mapping" performed in the brain of the frog. The model was constructed using neon-lamp/photoconductive (Ne-Pc) circuits on separate processing layers. These two elements serve the dual purpose of being principal circuit components as well as providing the interconnections between processing planes. In this manner, the inputs to a processing plane are photoconductive cells and and the outputs are neon lamps. This fabrication technique provides the advantages of easy access to individual components, rapid visual inspection of the operation of individual layers, and the simplicity of modifying the system by inserting or removing a particular layer.

Published in:

Military Electronics, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:MIL-7 ,  Issue: 2 & 3 )

Date of Publication:

April-July 1963

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.