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Space systems overview

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2 Author(s)
Nelson, N.A. ; Aerosp. Corp., Los Angeles, CA, USA ; Lenehan, J.M.

The elements of a space system, presented in a conversational form meant for a broad audience, are reviewed. The rationale of why space is useful for certain missions and each of the elements of a space system are described. The elements are the orbits and constellations, launch vehicles, and the design and construction of the spacecraft. The launch systems discussion emphasizes the enormous amount of energy required to put an object into orbit, a fact critical to understanding why weight is such an important parameter for spacecraft design. The chronology and spatial characteristics of launches into various orbits are covered. Worldwide launch sites are shown along with the reasons why their locations are chosen. A significant portion of the discussion covers spacecraft design. Beginning with the payload, which is the subsystem that performs the mission, each spacecraft subsystem is described. The final subsystem described is telemetry, tracking, and control, followed by a discussion of ground stations.<>

Published in:

Aerospace Applications Conference, 1993. Digest., 1993 IEEE

Date of Conference:

Jan. 31 1993-Feb. 5 1993