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Shear modulus imaging with 2-D transient elastography

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4 Author(s)
Sandrin, L. ; Lab. Ondes et Acoustique, CNRS, Paris, France ; Tanter, M. ; Catheline, S. ; Fink, M.

In previous work, we have shown that time-resolved 2-D transient elastography is a promising technique for characterizing the elasticity of soft tissues. It involves the measurement of the displacements induced by the propagation of low frequency (LF) pulsed shear waves in biological tissues. In this paper, we present a novel apparatus that contains a LF vibrating device surrounding a linear array of 128 ultrasonic transducers that performs ultrafast ultrasonic imaging (up to 10,000 frames/s) and that is able to follow in real time the propagation of a LF shear wave in the human body. The vibrating device is made of two rods, fixed to electromagnetic vibrators, that produce in the ultrasonic image area a large amplitude shear wave. The geometry has been chosen both to enhance the sensitivity and to create a quasi linear shear wave front in the imaging plane. An inversion algorithm is used to recover the shear modulus map from the spatio-temporal data, and the first experimental results obtained from tissue-equivalent materials are presented.

Published in:

Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:49 ,  Issue: 4 )

Date of Publication:

April 2002

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