Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Using developmental principles to plan design experiences for beginning engineering students

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

5 Author(s)

Experiments with a variety of teaching techniques to improve meaningful learning often are often only partially successful, leaving many students struggling with the abstract and complex knowledge of the engineering disciplines. The authors hypothesize that decisions about appropriate teaching methods are best made by considering the development of students' intellectual complexity using the "crux developmental model" (CDM) synthesized from a number of disparate theories in the educational, developmental and complexity literatures. The CDM and its application were assessed and improved over a three-year cycle in the context of a science and engineering camp for teenagers. Their results supported the hypothesis that the CDM: (1) provides a rational method of selecting developmentally appropriate activities to teach specific skills and content; and (2) provides a tool for customizing learning activities to maximize growth. According to the developmental model, the teenage participants in camp are working at the beginning of the same developmental transition that undergraduates are completing. Thus, they conclude this paper by proposing how the results of this study can be generalized to the undergraduate experience

Published in:

Frontiers in Education Conference, 2001. 31st Annual  (Volume:1 )

Date of Conference:

2001

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.