Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Effects of deliberate copper contamination from the plating solution on the electrical characteristics of MOSFETs

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

7 Author(s)
Tee, K.C. ; Sch. of Electr. & Electron. Eng., Nanyang Technol. Univ., Singapore ; Prasad, K. ; Lee, C.S. ; Gong, H.
more authors

N-channel and p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors of various (W/L) ratios down to 0.24-μm channel length have been used to investigate the effects of deliberate backside copper (Cu) contamination on the MOS field-effect transistor (MOSFET) electrical parameters. The backside of the wafer was flooded with copper sulphate (CuSO4) solution and air-dried. High-temperature annealing was carried out to drive Cu into silicon. It was discovered that the backside Cu contamination did not result in any undesirable effects on the MOS device performance. The MOS device parameters such as threshold voltage VTO, transconductance Gm, drain saturation current IDSAT, off-current Ioff, and junction leakage current for n+/p and p+/n diodes displayed no significant degradation, even after 5 h of annealing at 400°C in nitrogen ambient. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy data shows that Cu diffused into silicon only over a short distance, leading to little or no degradation of MOSFETs and junction diodes

Published in:

Semiconductor Manufacturing, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:14 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

May 2001

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.