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Demand-driven service differentiation in cluster-based network servers

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3 Author(s)
Huican Zhu ; Dept. of Comput. Sci., California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA, USA ; Hong Tang ; Tao Yang

Service differentiation that provides prioritized service qualities to multiple classes of client requests can effectively utilize available server resources. This paper studies how demand-driven service differentiation in terms of end-user performance can be supported in cluster-based network servers. Our objective is to deliver better services to high priority request classes without over-sacrificing low priority classes. To achieve this objective, we propose a dynamic scheduling scheme, called DDSD that adapts to fluctuating request resource demands by periodically repartitioning servers. This scheme also employs priority-based admission control to drop excessive user requests and achieve soft performance guarantees. For each scheduling period, our scheme monitors the system status and uses a queuing model to approximate server behaviors and guide resource allocation. Our experiments show that the proposed technique achieves demand-driven service differentiation while maximizing resource utilization and that it can substantially outperform static server partitioning

Published in:

INFOCOM 2001. Twentieth Annual Joint Conference of the IEEE Computer and Communications Societies. Proceedings. IEEE  (Volume:2 )

Date of Conference:

2001