Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

The interpretation and application of Rent's rule

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

2 Author(s)
Christie, P. ; Dept. of Electr. & Comput. Eng., Delaware Univ., Newark, DE, USA ; Stroobandt, D.

This paper provides a review of both Rent's rule and the placement models derived from it. It is proposed that the power-law form of Rent's rule, which predicts the number of terminals required by a group of gates for communication with the rest of the circuit, is a consequence of a statistically homogeneous circuit topology and gate placement. The term "homogeneous" is used to imply that quantities such as the average wire length per gate and the average number of terminals per gate are independent of the position within the circuit. Rent's rule is used to derive a variety of net length distribution models and the approach adopted in this paper is to factor the distribution function into the product of an occupancy probability distribution and a function which represents the number of valid net placement sites. This approach places diverse placement models under a common framework and allows the errors introduced by the modeling process to be isolated and evaluated. Models for both planar and hierarchical gate placement are presented.

Published in:

Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) Systems, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:8 ,  Issue: 6 )

Date of Publication:

Dec. 2000

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.