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High performance computer methods applied to predictive space weather simulations

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9 Author(s)
Clauer, C.R. ; Space Phys. Res. Lab., Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI, USA ; Gombosi, T.I. ; De Zeenw, D.L. ; Ridley, A.J.
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Taking advantage of the advent of massively parallel computers, sophisticated solution-adaptive techniques, and recent fundamental advances in basic numerical methods the authors have developed a high performance, adaptive-scale MHD code capable of resolving many of the critical processes in the Sun-Earth system which range over more than nine orders of magnitude. The development of such models are of increasing importance as the impact of space weather on vulnerable technological systems increases, and too, as the severity of space weather increases with the approach of solar maximum. There is an increasing need to develop physics-based, high performance models of the Sun-Earth system from the solar surface to the Earth's upper atmosphere which can operate faster than real time and which can provide reliable predictions of the near Earth space environment based upon solar observations and upstream solar wind measurements. They report on the status of the Michigan adaptive-scale MHD model, which is one effort whose goal is the development of an operational predictive space weather model

Published in:

Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:28 ,  Issue: 6 )

Date of Publication:

Dec 2000

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