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Mobile robot localization using an electronic compass for corridor environment

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4 Author(s)
Suksakulchai, S. ; Dept. of Electr. Eng., Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN, USA ; Thongchai, S. ; Wilkes, D.M. ; Kawamura, K.

This paper proposes a simple method for localization using an electronic compass. Electronic compasses are often used to detect the heading of mobile robots. However, electronic compasses have one drawback when used inside a building: they can easily be disturbed by electromagnetic sources (e.g., power lines) or large ferro-magnetic structures (e.g., bookshelves). However, this paper introduces another indoor application of electronic compasses. We take advantage of the magnetic field disturbances by using them as distinctive place recognition signatures. We first gather information about the changing heading as our robot travels along the hallway outside the lab, and then store this information. As the robot traverses the hallway, it gathers the information from the electronic compass and matches it with the pre-stored data. If a match is found, the robot can determine its current position. We use a sequential least-squares approximation approach for matching the signature. The simulation results will show that the robot can distinguish its location by using these signatures

Published in:

Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 2000 IEEE International Conference on  (Volume:5 )

Date of Conference:

2000

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