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A dual interpretation for direct binary search and its implications for tone reproduction and texture quality

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2 Author(s)
Lieberman, D.J. ; Sch. of Electr. & Comput. Eng., Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN, USA ; Allebach, J.P.

The direct binary search (DBS) algorithm employs a search heuristic to minimize the mean-squared perceptually filtered error between the halftone and continuous-tone original images. Based on an efficient method for evaluating the effect on the mean squared error of trial changes to the halftone image, we show that DBS also minimizes in a pointwise sense the absolute error under the same visual model, but at twice the viewing distance associated with the mean-squared error metric. This dual interpretation sheds light on the convergence properties of the algorithm, and clearly explains the tone bias that has long been observed with halftoning algorithms of this type. It also demonstrates how tone bias and texture quality are linked via the scale parameter, the product of printer resolution and viewing distance. Finally, we show how the tone bias can be eliminated by tone-correcting the continuous-tone image prior to halftoning it

Published in:

Image Processing, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:9 ,  Issue: 11 )

Date of Publication:

Nov 2000

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