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A new approach to the definition of power components in three-phase systems under nonsinusoidal conditions

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2 Author(s)
Ferrero, A. ; Dipartimento Elettrico, Elettronico E Sistemistico, Univ. of Catania, Italy ; Superti-Furga, G.

A method has been proposed for the definition of active and nonactive power components in three-phase systems under nonsinusoidal conditions. The method is more attractive than others since it is not a mere extension of methods employed in single-phase systems, but comes from the application of a quite powerful and synthetic mathematical tool specifically studied for the representation of three-wire three-phase systems in any possible condition: the Park transformation and the Park vectors. It is proven that the application of this method leads to the definition of two quantities, the real and the imaginary power, that are measurable in a quite simpler way than those proposed by other theories. The two satisfy all properties typical of the electrical power and are directly related, under sinusoidal and balanced conditions, to the active and reactive powers. It is shown how this method fits with other proposed methods that can be regarded in terms of this more general theory

Published in:

Instrumentation and Measurement, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:40 ,  Issue: 3 )

Date of Publication:

Jun 1991

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