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Acoustically monitor physiology during sleep and activity

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1 Author(s)
Scanlon, M.V. ; Army Res. Lab., Adelphi, MD, USA

An acoustic sensor technology has been developed to monitor a person's health and performance. The sensor consists of liquid or gel contained within a small, conformable, rubber bladder or pad that also includes a hydrophone. This enables the collection of high signal-to-noise ratio cardiac, respiratory, voice, and other physiological data. The pad also minimizes interference from ambient noise because it couples poorly with airborne noise. It is low cost and comfortable to wear for extended periods. Data is presented from a sensor pad in contact with a person's neck, providing continuous monitoring. These data can aid in the remote assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of cardiac, respiratory, and sleep disorders, recovery from surgery, as well as provide continuous human stress and performance indicators. Parameters such as heart rate and variability, breath rate, volume, wheeze or cough content, blood pressure, voice, voice stress, and motion indicators can be monitored over extended periods. Data collected during a nights sleep give indications of heart and breath patterns, restfulness of sleep, snoring, and other useful indicators. Other data shows that a neck sensor picks up the wearer's voice in 105 dB C weighted noise with fidelity sufficient to be used for voice communications or commands

Published in:

[Engineering in Medicine and Biology, 1999. 21st Annual Conference and the 1999 Annual Fall Meetring of the Biomedical Engineering Society] BMES/EMBS Conference, 1999. Proceedings of the First Joint  (Volume:2 )

Date of Conference:

Oct 1999

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