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Wavelet analysis of oscillations in the peripheral blood circulation measured by laser Doppler technique

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3 Author(s)
Stefanovska, A. ; Fac. of Electr. Eng., Ljubljana Univ., Slovenia ; Bracic, M. ; Kvernmo, H.D.

The wavelet transform technique, a time-frequency method with logarithmic frequency resolution, was used to analyze oscillations in human peripheral blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. The oscillations extended over a wide frequency state and their periods varied in time. Within the frequency range studied, 0.0095-1.6 Hz, five characteristic oscillations were revealed, arising from both local and central regulatory mechanisms. After the insertion of endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilators the spectra of blood how markedly differed in the frequency interval 0.0095-0.02 Hz. In this way it was demonstrated that endothelial activity is a rhythmic process that contributes to oscillations in blood flow with a characteristic frequency of around 0.01 Hz. The study illustrates the potential of laser Doppler flowmetry combined with dynamical systems analysis for studies of both the micro- and macroscopic mechanisms of blood flow regulation in vivo.

Published in:

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:46 ,  Issue: 10 )

Date of Publication:

Oct. 1999

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