Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Towards an architecture for reactive systems using an active real-time database and standardized components

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

4 Author(s)
Munnich, A. ; Lab. for Process Control & Real-Time Syst., Tech. Univ. Munchen, Germany ; Birkhold, M. ; Farber, G. ; Woitschach, P.

Component-based concepts are being increasingly used in software design since they allow high-quality software to be generated within a short time and hence at low costs. By contrast, component technologies haven't yet provided the means of composing software from components without additional programming. The reason for this lies in the combined transfer of control and data flow and the fact that there is no standardized control flow. An architecture model is presented that separates the transfer of the two information flows. The data flow is transferred via an active real-time database (ARTDB) and the control flow reduced to a few, indispensable commands. In this way it is possible to design applications simply by combining and configuring components without any additional code development. Initial positive experience with this architecture was gained from its industrial application. It was possible to demonstrate the suitability for systems with soft deadlines

Published in:

Database Engineering and Applications, 1999. IDEAS '99. International Symposium Proceedings

Date of Conference:

Aug 1999

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.